Jump to content

Menu

Veritas Press vs Memoria Press?


calihil
 Share

Recommended Posts

Anyone here have experience with both of these curricula? I am considering just going in full Classical next year with my will be 3rd and 1st graders. My oldest has been using the VP Self Paced Bible class and has really enjoyed it this year. I like the idea of VP "taking over" much of those areas, so to speak. I feel like I have so much on my plate. But I do like how MP has lesson plans all nicely laid out. I see that you can purchase lesson plans from VP but I don't know how they look, the samples aren't very good. My oldest isn't reading very well yet, either, and still needs a lot of hand holding, but so does my younger one.

 

So any advice or experience to share?

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I strongly dislike Veritas Press History curriculum. Lots of skill and drill, worksheets, and the kids quickly forget the information. I prefer a story based History. How about Susan Wise Bauer's books?

You mean the self paced online ones?

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use a lot of MPncurriculum and I am really liking all of it. There is a lot of workbook stuff but we do some of it orally and the rest verbally. I love the recitation in the back of the curriculum manual for the grades...I feel like the kids are really retaining it well. And they like the memorization and how smart it makes them feel. Maybe that's not actually good teaching but for now it's feeling successful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We started all MP. Spent 2nd grade and a partial third grade with VP and have returned to almost full MP after lots of stress.

 

If you are just talking curriculum and not enrollment in Diploma, then VP has a lot of wonderful things. We love the self-paved courses so far, we are really enjoying a live Memory Period. At History is awesome and the Pages of History books are fabulous. VP has good reading/literature lists.

 

Memoria Press has it all together in an easy to follow lesson plan with no busy work. (VP LP are laden with "school at home busy work") MP is gentler eet I feel like ey cover more and grasp the concept of Classical better.

 

With that said Classical Academic Press has some greats too. Especially in Song School Latin and some others.

I have years of experience with all three and would love to answer any specific questions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You mean the self paced online ones?

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk

 

 

 Sorry- maybe we are talking about different things. I mean the Veritas History cards.  For example: "Old Testament & Ancient Egypt Flashcards cover 32 events during the Old Testament and in Ancient Egypt. Students will learn through informative and engaging flashcards, starting with Creation and ultimately concluding with the fall of Egypt to Rome. Our history series applies the time-proven classical method of memorizing a timeline with supporting facts."  It comes with worksheets that the kids fill out after reading the cards.  Lots of tests and quizzes- pure regurgitation. Maybe there is more to it than just that, but my current school uses it as a supplement.  I prefer my History more story oriented. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We enjoyed Memoria Press' lit. guides. If your child is not reading well above grade level, any classical curriculum will be very challenging. You may need to go back a grade level or two. I used The MP 2nd gr. lit. books with my then 5th gr. son who is dyslexic. He enjoyed them. One nice thing about the lit. guides is they aren't labeled with a grade level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use the VP History and Bible cards and love them. No worksheets or quizzes here. There are resources listed on each card so you do a whole week per card with readings and stories. The card provides a condensed blurb for the student to memorize along with the date. You do one card a week. The beginning of each day you recite the previous weeks cards and discuss how they lnk to this weeks card. It was great. By having physical cards, I could pull out say ten randomly and have Ds put them in order. Ds has a really great timeline of history to now base larger studies off of.

 

Ds liked the self paced history. It has games, video, and exercises. However, I wanted more writing and lecture in our history. We switched to The Great Courses around late 4th grade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry- maybe we are talking about different things. I mean the Veritas History cards. For example: "Old Testament & Ancient Egypt Flashcards cover 32 events during the Old Testament and in Ancient Egypt. Students will learn through informative and engaging flashcards, starting with Creation and ultimately concluding with the fall of Egypt to Rome. Our history series applies the time-proven classical method of memorizing a timeline with supporting facts." It comes with worksheets that the kids fill out after reading the cards. Lots of tests and quizzes- pure regurgitation. Maybe there is more to it than just that, but my current school uses it as a supplement. I prefer my History more story oriented.

There is A LOT more to them. It is too bad they do not use them with the resource selections. It allows students to begin learning research skills, narration, summarizing, and provides a large woven story to history. The cards are just the spine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use and love lots of VP resources. My little ones are thriving with their history based on VP's cards and it IS story based rather than worksheet based. The history curricula (NOT the online parts) is one of those buffet type. By that I mean here are all the options now pick which parts work best for you. If it's all drill and kill it's the choice of the school implementing it and not because VP demands it. My third grader does have to do some of those by my choosing, because I think it's a good stretching exercise for her that leads up to writing good summaries in time. She uses VP's card based Bible too, and only does those questions orally.

 

My little guy (6yo) is currently using First Favorites. The writing is a stretch for him, but that's a good thing. I take it as slow as he needs and he's improving by leaps and bounds. Most of those FF stories have become family favorites. Older kids will come out of the woodwork when we start a new one with exclamations of, "I remember that one! I love that one!" Before FF we just worked on phonics and basal readers. DS6 also tags along with the above mentioned sister for history and he's in absolute awe of ancient Egypt. He can rattle off all sorts of facts about the various pyramids, who built them, where they're at, the geography of the ancient world, and so on. Because it's interesting and engaging and full of stories. He's never been handed one of the worksheets or tests.

 

But it sounds like the OP is more interested in the online "self-paced" parts of VP, which I can't really comment on. We did the free trial in the past, but that's it. I'm on my third complete cycle of those cards with my little two now and enjoying every bit of it.

 

MP on the other hand has never worked in this house. I've tried a random smattering of their books over the years. The simplicity of it pulled me for ages, but every time I'd try one of their books we never were able to finish it. They were just so... flat. My kids balked. I ended up balking. It was all read this, fill in these blanks and answer these questions. Lather, rinse, repeat. We're more let's go read a pile of good books and discuss it homeschoolers. VP lets us do that. MP did not.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're more let's go read a pile of good books and discuss it homeschoolers. VP lets us do that. MP did not.

We are the opposite with MP. It has led to some really awesome discussions and side trails.

 

I think you can assign it as "read this and fill in the workbook" but, you're right, that is drudgery. The workbooks were originally developed as classroom guides, where there is a lot of discussion, the kids don't just sit and fill in answers, they take turns reading the selection, they work with the teacher to compose a really well written answer to one or two of the questions.

 

I think MP looks like a "throw workbooks at a kid and fill in the blanks" curriculum. In practice, that's not how it should be used. I'm not sure how MP could communicate that better to hs families, because I do see it as a common complaint.

 

We like VP's self-paced stuff, but use it for fun during the summer. It was really nice that my son did VP's Greek and Roman history last summer. It's really given him an amazing start and context for MP's Famous Men of Rome this school year.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a fan of VP's materials. I have never felt like VP's history is drill and kill. We use the Bible and History cards as our spine. We typically complete the worksheets orally. My children have loved learning the history song, reading great books, and completing fun activities.

 

We also enjoy VP's Legends and Leagues geography.

 

Next year, I look forward to using VP's First Favorites and More Favorites.

Edited by MyLife
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are the opposite with MP. It has led to some really awesome discussions and side trails.

 

I think you can assign it as "read this and fill in the workbook" but, you're right, that is drudgery. The workbooks were originally developed as classroom guides, where there is a lot of discussion, the kids don't just sit and fill in answers, they take turns reading the selection, they work with the teacher to compose a really well written answer to one or two of the questions.

 

I think MP looks like a "throw workbooks at a kid and fill in the blanks" curriculum. In practice, that's not how it should be used. I'm not sure how MP could communicate that better to hs families, because I do see it as a common complaint.

 

 

 

Yes, I think that MP materials would be pretty boring if used as independent workbooks, but I find the teachers' guides useful for providing structure for discussion. We are currently using the guide to D'Aulaires' Greek Myths and my 9 y/o loves it. I was hesitant to even order the guide, thinking it would be blah, but now I'm considering using MP materials for more subjects next year. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...