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What's with the ads?

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Preparing for the adult world


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What's with the ads?

#1 frogger

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 10:57 AM

I'm looking for helps in planning on preparing my son for the real world. The one with strangers who won't appreciate or understand his quirks. :) I've looked into local groups but the ones I've found are not what I want. He is looking for a job which will probably be retail which will be more challenging than most for an HFA. Hopefully, we won't push him over the edge. If he finds something more in between that would be great. In other words, not a job that requires no people skills (because he could use the practice) but maybe not the extreme of a grocery store. Anyway, we also need to work on phone skills and a few other things. I will try to keep a running list.

The library has this book

https://www.amazon.c...xzRL&ref=plSrch

I'm also looking at this curriculum.

http://lifeafterieps...nt-soft-skills/

I'd love to hear any other suggestions.
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#2 PinkyandtheBrains.

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 11:24 AM



Following for ideas as my kiddo is fast approaching adulthood.

My kid is planning on college and his therapist recommended this book:

On Your Own: A College Readiness Guide for Teens with ADHD/LD.



The skills apply to ASD as well.
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#3 Moved On

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:26 PM

Following for ideas as my kiddo is fast approaching adulthood.

My kid is planning on college and his therapist recommended this book:

On Your Own: A College Readiness Guide for Teens with ADHD/LD.



The skills apply to ASD as well.

 This looks interesting. Thank you for posting about it! She has another book with the title Putting on the Breaks that I want to look at for my 8 yr old. 

 

Frogger, thank you for the topic! I am going on a long term forum break but will be following your thread :) I'll be checking out the resources you linked as well. If I have a few minutes at some point to look at the resources I have and am planning to get, I will link whatever I see might be useful. 


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#4 Crimson Wife

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:49 PM

Barbara Bissonnette has a number of books geared towards helping those with Asperger's navigate career-related issues. I'm not sure which is best since my daughter is nowhere near transition planning.


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#5 kbutton

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:12 PM

The second link looks more promising to me because it looks like it's geared toward those with disabilities. I didn't think the first one was. I would look for autism specific things, or maybe materials from Social Thinking.

 

In our area, they have something called career passport that takes kids through some job skills training. There are also programs in some places where people with disabilities have job coaching provided, and they learn these skills with a coach.

 

I recently heard of an autism life coach service. They have dinners for people to come and socialize while also getting coaching on social skills. They have other activities as well. I am copying their blog/website because they might have something to recommend to you: https://autismperson....wordpress.com/

 

A search on Amazon for "autism job skills" brought up some interesting suggestions, including this book that looks good and appears to be part of a series: https://www.amazon.c...tism job skills

 

I have heard good things about books by Jed Baker.



#6 frogger

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 09:25 PM

Wow, those dinners and game times look like a great idea kbutton.

Thanks for some leads. I'm off to look at them. Would be happy to see more.
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#7 Moved On

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 09:31 PM

I like this one because it coves a lot of ground and brings together the stories of many people on the spectrum, sharing their stories and how they cope with different situations. It was put together by Tony Attwood and a couple of others. I actually already own this one. 

 

Been There. Done That. Try This!: An Aspie's Guide to Life on Earth
 
I also stumbled across this. It is pricey but I want to look into it a bit further. It seemed interesting at first glance:
 
Autism and Learning Differences: An Active Learning Teaching Toolkit by Michael P. McManmon
 

Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 14 July 2017 - 09:35 PM.

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#8 Moved On

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 08:35 AM

Following for ideas as my kiddo is fast approaching adulthood.

My kid is planning on college and his therapist recommended this book:

On Your Own: A College Readiness Guide for Teens with ADHD/LD.



The skills apply to ASD as well.

One of the reviewers on Amazon mentions a companion to this book, with the title:

Ready for Take-Off: Preparing Your Teen with ADHD or LD for College

I put that one on the list to get first but I'm considering getting both, eventually.

I have Jed Baker's *Social Skills Picture Book for High School and Beyond* on my list also. I own the one for younger kids and his *Overcoming Anxiety in Children and Teens*. His books have been really useful for us.
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#9 Moved On

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 08:49 AM

Barbara Bissonnette has a number of books geared towards helping those with Asperger's navigate career-related issues. I'm not sure which is best since my daughter is nowhere near transition planning.


I would start with this one:

https://www.amazon.c...ara Bissonnette

It is written as a coaching guide for professionals and parents. The other two are self help guides.
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#10 Jennifer-72

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 06:01 PM

I am waiting for this book to come out: http://www.jkp.com/c...ear-olds-2.html

#11 Moved On

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 06:48 PM

 

I also stumbled across this. It is pricey but I want to look into it a bit further. It seemed interesting at first glance:

 
Autism and Learning Differences: An Active Learning Teaching Toolkit by Michael P. McManmon
 

 

I ended up buying this as it fits well with what I am researching/ studying. I spent quite a bit lately on university and other psych texts so I bought this as an ebook to save a few dollars. I also bought my 13 year old O'Tooles book:

 

The Asperkid's (Secret) Book of Social Rules: The Handbook of Not-So-Obvious Social Guidelines for Tweens and Teens with Asperger Syndrome

 

My 13 year old does not like books that talk down to him , so O'Toole's btdt approach and writing style should work well for him. I'll be getting the others I mentioned at a later date. 

 

Oi, my list of books to read/ study just went up to 11. I better get going. I'll keep an eye on this thread for more gems  :)

 

Frogger, I hope you are finding what bests suits your needs, and thanks again for starting this thread  :)


Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 15 July 2017 - 06:50 PM.

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#12 Moved On

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 06:53 PM

I would start with this one:

https://www.amazon.c...ara Bissonnette

It is written as a coaching guide for professionals and parents.

I have added this to my "considering" list as well. 


Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 15 July 2017 - 06:54 PM.


#13 kbutton

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 12:59 PM

I am waiting for this book to come out: http://www.jkp.com/c...ear-olds-2.html

 

That publisher has some other good titles--I'm working through Parenting ASD Teens, and I have seen other books that look promising. 


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#14 Moved On

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 05:00 PM

I would start with this one:

https://www.amazon.c...ara Bissonnette

It is written as a coaching guide for professionals and parents.

 

After reading this in the preview pages on Amazon, I bought the Kindle edition. These are the type of resources I look for. 

 

 

Coaching should not be confused with advice giving. Professional coaches are specifically trained not to give advice to their clients. People generally don’t act on most of the advice they receive. This is because the advice reflects the needs, experiences and thought process of the giver. 

Coaches use Socratic-like questioning to help clients think outside the box, consider options and find solutions that work for them. In Quiet Leadership, executive coach David Rock explains how each person’s brain stores, organizes and retrieves information differently (Rock 2006, p. 8). He writes, “Doing the thinking for other people is not just a waste of our own energy; it also gets in the way of other people working out the right answers” (p. 9).

Imagine that I said, “You should only respond to emails at 9: 00am and 3: 00pm.” You would almost certainly begin telling me why that schedule would not work. But what if I asked, “How can you better manage emails?” or, “Where do you need help prioritizing?” Those questions shift the focus to solutions that make sense to you. The same thing happens when suggestions are framed as open-ended questions: “What tasks can you delegate?” or “How valuable would it be to make a list of priorities for the week?”

I utilize coaching techniques but adapt them to the needs of individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome. Later in this chapter, I describe how.

Although coaching is not psychotherapy, it draws on a number of therapeutic techniques, such as active listening, empathy, cognitive restructuring, reinforcement and reframing.
 
Bissonnette, Barbara. Helping Adults with Asperger's Syndrome Get & Stay Hired: Career Coaching Strategies for Professionals and Parents of Adults on the Autism Spectrum (Kindle Locations 1254-1255). Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Kindle Edition. 

 

 

Bought a text on language development as well. OK, I'm gone  :auto:


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#15 Jennifer-72

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 05:52 PM

That publisher has some other good titles--I'm working through Parenting ASD Teens, and I have seen other books that look promising.


Yes, I have found many good books from that publisher over the years. I frequently check to see what new books they have coming out.
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