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Anyone done ICAS testing as homeschoolers?


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#1 chocolate-chip chooky

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 06:25 PM

My daughter (9) has never had to sit an exam under real exam conditions and I'm thinking that it's time to start the process of preparing for this.

 

I've come across ICAS testing, which is for Australia, NZ, SE Asia and South Africa, I believe.

 

Have any of you done the ICAS tests as homeschoolers?

 

I'm hoping that a first step could be to do one of the tests at home, under our own exam-type conditions, and then maybe next year or beyond we could do it with an invigilator.

 

Any thoughts?


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#2 Vlad

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 09:03 PM

We're going to try this year - however the pack comes in 3 so we're trying to find two more homeshoolers to join us.  


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#3 Pegs

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:26 AM

I'm considering having DS do a couple of them as part of building a case in favour of homeschooling. Family court thing. 'Nuff said, right?

#4 Pegs

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:14 PM

DS is keen. Looks like we're in. :)

#5 Pegs

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Posted Yesterday, 06:24 PM

DS will be sitting for grade 2 science, mathematics, English.

If anyone in Australia would like to share in our order, please let me know. I'm going to have to order extra tests anyhow.

#6 chocolate-chip chooky

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Posted Yesterday, 06:50 PM

DS will be sitting for grade 2 science, mathematics, English.

If anyone in Australia would like to share in our order, please let me know. I'm going to have to order extra tests anyhow.

 

One thing I pondered was whether to go with chronological age (the grade she'd be in if in school) or go with the grade level she's currently working at.

 

I guess if it's just for the experience, it doesn't really matter. I just know from experience that if it isn't challenging, she's won't engage with it.

 

 

Are you just going to have your son sit it at home?



#7 Pegs

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Posted Yesterday, 06:59 PM

One thing I pondered was whether to go with chronological age (the grade she'd be in if in school) or go with the grade level she's currently working at.

I guess if it's just for the experience, it doesn't really matter. I just know from experience that if it isn't challenging, she's won't engage with it.


Are you just going to have your son sit it at home?


If it's just for the experience, you might as well test out of level for a bit of challenge. :)

I'm testing DS according to the year he'd be in in school because I figure that's kind of the point of standardised testing, and I also want to give him the best chance of tippy toppy scores because I think it could really go a long way in advocating for keeping him at home. It might also open doors for gifted programs run by our local uni. We don't have IQ scores, so it would be good to start building a bit of a paper trail showing achievement in the top whatever percent of his peers.

Yes, we'll do it at home. He's done the NME already under exam conditions at the kitchen bench, and the Enigma maths comp online.
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#8 Pegs

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Posted Yesterday, 07:03 PM

I'm in a state where we can register either by grade level, or primary/secondary. We're registered as working at primary school level, just generally.

Officially, DS could be in grade 1 or 2. He wants to be in 3, but I've decided to tell him that he's in grade 2, but working at different levels in different subjects.

We'll consider an 'official' grade skip later if it ever becomes necessary in order to access services or experience which would be otherwise not available to him.

#9 chocolate-chip chooky

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Posted Yesterday, 07:40 PM

I'm in a state where we can register either by grade level, or primary/secondary. We're registered as working at primary school level, just generally.

Officially, DS could be in grade 1 or 2. He wants to be in 3, but I've decided to tell him that he's in grade 2, but working at different levels in different subjects.

We'll consider an 'official' grade skip later if it ever becomes necessary in order to access services or experience which would be otherwise not available to him.

 

I'm in QLD and registered with the HEU here. We don't need to specify grade at all, which is one thing I love about our system here. 

As long as we demonstrate progress and a broad range of topics, resources and activities at the child's level, the powers-that-be just leave us be for another year.

 

For the purposes of testing, however, I'm not sure what I'd do. My daughter just doesn't engage with work that's too easy, and that's when she actually makes mistakes.

 

I haven't ordered any of the ICAS tests yet, but it's still on my radar, because I think some familiarity with test procedures is a good idea.


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#10 Grover

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Posted Yesterday, 07:57 PM

I host our local homeschool community for ICAS - I invite entries and then supervise them in my home (I'm  registered teacher).  I have to have my own kids do them under someone else's supervision for their scores to be counted though, which WAS fine, because another homeschool mum was also a registered teacher so we supervised together and she did my kids and I did hers.  Unfortunately she has moved on and no other homeschooling parents have answered my plea, so this year I will be supervising other people's children while they do it, and sending my own kids to a school with their papers to do theirs (the school is where a friend works, so they're good with that).  It's worth it for us to do the supervision properly though, because both kids have won multiple medals so far, and I'd hate for them to have them invalidated  because the supervision wasn't done properly. 

 

Both of mine do them a year ahead of their level if they were at school - DD because she is on the cut off anyway, and going younger doesn't make sense for her and DS because I entered him for the experience a year too young, intending to do that level again "properly" the next year but he medalled, so we couldn't really repeat!  It's not even remotely close to the level either of them are actually working at, but there is still enough to challenge them, and it's GREAT for showing them that "check your work" isn't just something I say because I feel like it, lol!  Silly mistakes have cost DS at least two medals, possibly another one or two - and I'm talking mistakes he recognised as soon as he looked at the paper. 


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#11 Pegs

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Posted Yesterday, 08:14 PM

It's worth it for us to do the supervision properly though, because both kids have won multiple medals so far, and I'd hate for them to have them invalidated because the supervision wasn't done properly.


Oh, right! Thanks for the heads up. I'll look into finding someone qualified to supervise JIC DS medals.