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1st grade planning 2024/2025


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What is everybody using?

 

Language Arts: All About Reading 3, Evan Moor Spelling 1, First Language Lessons 1, Writing with Ease 1

Math: Saxon 3

History: Story of the World 1

Science: Elemental Science--Biology for the Grammar Stage

Latin: Song School Latin 1

Religion: The Ology: Ancient Truths Ever New by Marty Machowski

Other: Tech: typing.com;   Piano: Music for Little Mozarts. 

 

 

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Just started thinking about my 6yo who will be in first grade next year. She is eager to learn and easy to please.

I will most likely use but can change:

Lang Arts: HWT, All About Spelling, Brave Writer Jot It Down

Math: JUMP Math

Science/Hist/Geo: Unit Studies of her choosing. 

Extras: Calendar, Keyboarding Without Tears

Girl Guides & Swimming Lessons

 

 

Edited by alysee
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I'm probably going to come back and edit this. My first grader is my second but she feels so different from my first.

Language Arts: All About Reading, HWT/D'Nealian (seriously she can't decide so it's whichever she wants to do on any given day), The Secret World of Talking Animals from Thinking Tree, I may also use some stuff from the year of Bravewriter Quill I had got my son. Tag along reading Poodle with older brother.

Math: Singapore Math

Science: Mystery Science, some The Writing Revolution output.

History: Curiosity Chronicles, some The Writing Revolution output. 

 

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Second child turning 6 next month: he started doing what I consider kindergarten work at 4.5, just very slowly. I declared, he can say he’s in first grade once he finishes Recipe for Reading workbook 4 (sometime this month).

English: Recipe for Reading workbooks 5-8, layered with Apples and Pears A, adding in Dancing Bears/Fast Track from sound foundations to hammer fluency.

Narrate Aesop’s fables orally

Humanities: continue homemade world geography read-alouds through summer. transition to north america/native american books in Fall, early american history in spring.

Lots of literature favorites at bedtime and in car. Just finished Farmer Boy, and he’s excited to hear the Little House books his older sister is always yapping about. I don’t schedule these, just browse assorted literature book lists. Rabbit Ears Productions audio stories are a constant in our household.

Math: Second Grade Math With Confidence intermixed with oral speed drills pulled from the Rod and Staff 2 math fact practice pages. This kid can understand and extrapolate conceptually much earlier than his older sibling, and has had no difficulties with MWC K and 1, BUT half the time you ask him what 1+6 is and he doesn’t yet have quick recall and gets totally stumped. For my first MWC was just the right amount of practice to master math facts, but this one needs a lot more rote practice. Maybe I should have made him slow down on earlier levels until he could manage more of the written practice himself…

Science: tag along Berean Builders science in the ancient world, nature read aloud so

lots of cindy rollins style morning time singing, memory work etc

Learning to swim, learning the can-jo, digging holes in the yard and goofing off with homeschool friends at Wild and Free and half day co-op

 

 

 

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Current 5 yo has a summer birthday, so will be a young first grader (or older Kindergartener) next year. We mostly will continue with what works, where he will likely be somewhere between K and 1st grade level come the fall.

Language Arts: All About Reading, HWOT, possibly Spelling You See Listen and Write, possibly CGP Reception/Year 1 Phonics or English. We read aloud lots of books and poems - focus right now on lots of books he cannot wait to read himself like Dragon Masters.

Math: Singapore, moving into Beast Academy. We’re already finished Singapore K-level, and thinking about taking some months to play lots of math games to really internalize math facts before moving on to first grade level. 

Science: Magic School Bus and other science picture books, and some hands on activities inspired by them. We are a sciencey family so we have a lot of science picture books, grow vegetables from seed, play with electronics kits, record the weather etc anyway. Possibly Kiwi Crate or Mel Kids subscription boxes. Fine motor skills could use the extra practice, so will do some crafts around science/engineering interests. 

History: dinosaurs and prehistoric animals are a big interest right now, so we‘ll dive into that. Usborne Beginner History series as a brief overview of major civilizations. We have some specific picture books that fit well with the content of museums (Romans, Egypt) that we can visit easily. 

Geography: Sill picture books on habitats, Barefoot books sticker atlas as jumping off point to discuss and look up stuff.

Other: learning a musical instrument, Lingobus Chinese, swimming. Previous years we’ve been doing picture books and crafts around seasons/holidays/festivals and will continue that as it‘s fun and we already have all the stuff.

 

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My little guy's turning 6 in early September and he's been easing into school for Jr. Kindy & Kindy. We took a few programs and did them half-speed to spread them through 2 years. He's pretty much self-taught in reading so I'll need to figure out where he's at. He's tagging along with his older sisters for a bunch of these subjects.

Math:

  • The Good & the Beautiful 1
  • Wild Math 1 & In the Garden with Wild Math

Science/Nature:

  • Blossom & Root Level 2: Wonders of the Plant & Fungi Kingdoms - starting over summer
  • Beginning Herbalism unit from Wild Learning
  • Kids' Herb Book + Boreal Herbal - identifying local plants and their uses
  • A bit of gardening, focus on our unique climate
  • Wilderness first aid & survival skills & emergency preparedness
  • Blossom & Root Level 5 - Astronomy (over winter, since we can't see the stars at other times of the year)
  • For the Love of Homeschooling Nature Study units
  • Mystery Science

History:

  • Prehistory, evolution, paleontology/archaeology & mythology
  • Blossom & Root Prehistoric Life from Level 3
  • Layers of Learning Ancients

Canadian Studies:

  • Geography - Great Canadian Adventure's - Tiny Travellers
  • Geography - The Canadian Adventure (Canadian Homeschooler)
  • History - My Canadian Time Capsule (Canadian Homeschooler)
  • History - DIY Year 2

Language Arts:

  • Grammar: First Language Lessons 1
  • Reading: Wild Reading 2 (or All About Reading Level 4, according to the placement test)
  • Writing: Writing With Ease 1
  • Phonics: Explode the Code 1-3(?) to reinforce concepts
  • Spelling: Sequential Spelling Level 1?
  • Handwriting: Canadian Handwriting A
Edited by AsgardCA
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  • 2 weeks later...

My son is technically kindergarten for the next school year but we did kindergarten this entire year.

Literature: lighting literature

First Language Lessons

handwriting without tears

explode the code (finishing up AAR 2)

Singapore Primary 2022 1st grade

mystery science 

sprinkle in some units of core knowledge because we all love it. 
 

Originally I wanted to do around the world but I feel next school year will be better because I’ll have a 6.5 year old and a new 5 year old. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ordered

All about Spelling Level 1 - own already

Beast academy Books 1&2

Handwriting without Tears - My Printing Book

Chalkboard Publishing Daily Language Skills 1

Edited by alysee
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I'm looking at Cottage Press Primer 1. I didn't use this for my eldest... I have to remember why. Right now I just think it was because the copy work seemed too much, in which case it won't be a problem for DD5.

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Hi! New here. Starting first grade in earnest next week. Long, boring story. She just turned seven. 

Phonics: All About Reading 3. She placed into AAR 4, but I have too much gifted kid baggage about placement exams to push her to the edge of ability when review could only help.

Math: Singapore Math Dimensions. Her teachers told me she was ready for second grade math, but there are some gaps and she despises math so we started at the beginning a few months ago in hope of making it a delightful subject. A few small signs point to yes. Some times I worry I am boring her with all of this review. 

Spelling: All About Spelling 1. She keeps volunteering for additional math lessons rather than start start this, which is an odd sort of victory.

History: Just ordered Story of the World 1. So excited. 

Science: Dithering between Scientific Connections through Inquiry and adding the BFSU book suggestions, or Real Science Odyssey. 

Handwriting: Currently using The Good and the Beautiful's doodle series. I would purchase Handwriting without Meltdowns if it existed. Daily fine motor practice in the meantime. I hope we can use HWT some day, but no rush. 

Literature: Trying every chapter book in creation and reading aloud from James Herriot's Treasury for Children for now. 

Foreign language: TBD.

Is anyone using an art curriculum? 

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2 hours ago, Queen of the Tabbies said:

Math: Singapore Math Dimensions. Her teachers told me she was ready for second grade math, but there are some gaps and she despises math so we started at the beginning a few months ago in hope of making it a delightful subject. A few small signs point to yes. Some times I worry I am boring her with all of this review. 

DS let me know math was boring. Basically when his focus starts to waver and he starts to fight a subject it means the material is either too easy or too hard. To figure that out (if it isn't obvious) I just say OK do this/these problems for me as quick as you can and if they are correct we can skip the rest. I pick the harder problems for this exercise. If he complains about that then I pick then problems he was doing and I say let's do this problem together. I do it with him to see where the confusion might be, then that's the end of math for the day; I regroup and figure out how I can teach or scaffold it starting tomorrow's lesson. 

3 hours ago, Queen of the Tabbies said:

Handwriting: Currently using The Good and the Beautiful's doodle series. I would purchase Handwriting without Meltdowns if it existed. Daily fine motor practice in the meantime. I hope we can use HWT some day, but no rush. 

HWT starts with doodling for a few pages. I would say for us this was the handwriting without meltdowns. You can start in Kick Start Kindergarten even. If meltdowns are happening with this you may want to invest in the teacher's guide. It has more things in there to make handwriting even more scaffolded and gentle.  

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19 hours ago, Clarita said:

DS let me know math was boring. Basically when his focus starts to waver and he starts to fight a subject it means the material is either too easy or too hard. To figure that out (if it isn't obvious) I just say OK do this/these problems for me as quick as you can and if they are correct we can skip the rest. I pick the harder problems for this exercise. If he complains about that then I pick then problems he was doing and I say let's do this problem together. I do it with him to see where the confusion might be, then that's the end of math for the day; I regroup and figure out how I can teach or scaffold it starting tomorrow's lesson. 

HWT starts with doodling for a few pages. I would say for us this was the handwriting without meltdowns. You can start in Kick Start Kindergarten even. If meltdowns are happening with this you may want to invest in the teacher's guide. It has more things in there to make handwriting even more scaffolded and gentle.  

Thanks for the reminder about the teacher's guide. I bought First Grade student and teacher set, then a friend gave me the Kick Start Kindergarten student workbook. I will track down the teacher's edition.

 

Edited by Queen of the Tabbies
Forgot a word
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The preschool level of HWT (My First School Book/ My First Lowercase Book) is also good if fine motor skills are an issue. The writing is bigger, fewer repeats are expected, and it means the later levels seem familiar.

For Art curriculum - we don’t follow a curriculum. For us, handwriting fine motor issues are coupled with a lack of interest in coloring/drawing. Not sure if this is the case for you. Anything that gets him to willingly interact with drawing/crafting materials is a win. Things we do do:

*Kids Art Hub draw along videos 

*Encouraging making greeting cards and thank you notes (he will draw or craft for a purpose)

*Making seasonal crafts/decorations 

*We are fortunate to live in a city with museums/art galleries with kids days that usually involve some hands on workshops/ craft activities - he will usually take part. There are also kids interpretive tours of some art exhibitions.

*If we are traveling we visit art museums and focus on a few pictures. We try to read picture books about the artist or a famous painting in advance. We also read picture books on styles like "If Monet Painted a Monster" and "If Picasso Painted a Snowman"

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  • 3 months later...

I am back but with a different plan than before. 
 

Math will be Singapore primary 2022 first grade

All about Reading level 3

Those are still the same but a few changes

We finished HWOT kindergarten but now my son wants to do Getty Dubay because I decided to get their calligraphy book. He wants to be like his mama and I’m ok with that. Starting with level A.

I decided that even though he’s only 5.5 he is more than ready for spelling. We are going to attempt Spelling Workout A and see how that goes.

First Language Lessons

I will see if I think he’s ready for writing with ease. I feel like he’s very advanced in ELA. 
 

Mystery science 
 

I’m stuck on what we will do for content. 
 

I thought about lightning literature but I don’t feel it’s meant for us.

 

 

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I'm trying hard not to do too much- does this still seem like too much? We won't do everything every day.

So far I think we'll do:

Math- Math Mammoth as base, supplementing with Dreambox and some Beast Academy puzzles and maybe some contest math problems mixed in. 

Language Arts:

     Reading- Probably AAR, but maybe nothing formal. I'll give him the placement test for AAR in August and see how he does. He seems pretty close to not needing a reading/phonics curricula anymore so I'm on the fence.

     Spelling- AAS level 2

     Handwriting- We're working through a cursive book and will keep at it.

     Grammar- probably nothing except practice- he did Grammar and Sentence Island and we're working through the Practice Island sentences. I don't want to do Town or the Poetry books yet. 

     Writing- We'll probably do a little sentence composition and journaling with some art; like- draw a picture and write a sentence about it... nothing formal.

     Reading- Read alouds and silent reading.

Social Studies- Exploring the World Through Story

I thought of adding more for history but decided the geography in EWS is enough for 1st grade.

Science- Young Scientist kits

French- StudyCat and probably an Outschool class. I might do Homeschool Languages too but it seems a little $$$ to me. 

We're also going to work through a Social/Emotional learning workbook and I have Home Art Studio DVDs (I'm old) so we might do that too. 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Paige said:

does this still seem like too much?

If you're looking to cut something out, we don't start spelling until 2nd. Otherwise looks like you've got all the things covered. We alternate science and history days. My list always seems long, but when each subject only takes 10 min it still ends up being a short school day.

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I'm noticing that no one is using math with confidence and I'm nervous. 

My son is mathy, so I want to make sure I'm doing good math with him. 

We did k and half of 1 in his k year, and I planned to finish 1 and move into 2 this year for first... But I keep wondering if we should be doing different math. He thinks it's super super easy. 😬

 

We're doing AAR, First language lessons, and possibly AAS for LA. As well as handwriting. 

 

Elemental science Astronomy and Earth I think.

Exploring the world through story B.

 

Various social study units: American symbols, our state lapbook, being a good citizen, and me on the map. 

I have a couple other things I may try to slide in here and there as well.

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37 minutes ago, MumOf5 said:

I'm noticing that no one is using math with confidence and I'm nervous. 

I remember beta testing part of Kate's material back in the day, before she published her curriculum. 

If your kiddo is enjoying maths, keep doing what you're doing. If he could do with some variation, there are plenty of options for that.

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We do own the MWC 1st grade book, and we may also use it a bit. We used MWC K in my child’s Pre-K year, and it was great, but I didn’t feel that he was ready to move to 1 at the end of the year (adding and subtracting were laborious, the counting by 2, 5, 10 at the end  was too hard, it didn’t feel that he had a really solid grasp of some concepts, he never really got the sight recognition of bigger numbers in the ten frame). This year (K) we did Singapore K and it was just right. So we will continue on with Singapore, but  more because he was young to be doing MWC K, rather than that there was anything wrong with it. I did like that the workbook doesn’t assume that the child can read a lot of text.

Singapore K did seem more advanced than MWC K in terms of material (especially if you just look through the workbooks), but that’s not a problem if you’re just moving through the grades as your child is ready.

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We have a few changes to the plan (above). DS has got into the Oxford Reading Tree Biff, Chip and Kipper books and is currently motivated to read a book each day, even figuring out tricky sounds which we haven’t got to in AAR yet. Things are really starting to come together. So we’ll follow that as long as it lasts.

We did take some time to play games and solidify math facts without a curriculum. We also found an app, Funexpected Math, which has helped a lot and is actually fun. Games are working so well, we might stick with that a while longer, so we can focus formal "workbook" time on writing and coloring where he really needs the extra practice.

I have bought History Quest Early Times, and may use it as a read aloud (but not do the curriculum/activities this year).

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On 7/10/2024 at 1:01 AM, Penderwink said:

We do own the MWC 1st grade book, and we may also use it a bit. We used MWC K in my child’s Pre-K year, and it was great, but I didn’t feel that he was ready to move to 1 at the end of the year (adding and subtracting were laborious, the counting by 2, 5, 10 at the end  was too hard, it didn’t feel that he had a really solid grasp of some concepts, he never really got the sight recognition of bigger numbers in the ten frame). This year (K) we did Singapore K and it was just right. So we will continue on with Singapore, but  more because he was young to be doing MWC K, rather than that there was anything wrong with it. I did like that the workbook doesn’t assume that the child can read a lot of text.

Singapore K did seem more advanced than MWC K in terms of material (especially if you just look through the workbooks), but that’s not a problem if you’re just moving through the grades as your child is ready.

Yeah I honestly felt like K was easy for my son this past year, and we buzzed through it. Once we hit the 1st grade stuff I slowed down to one lesson at a time, but it was still really easy for him. We will be starting 1st grade next month, halfway done with it, and then I planned to start 2nd MWC... but now I am wondering if I may be better adding in some Math Mammoth practice for a review, and to make sure things are solidified before we move on.  Honestly he isnt a huge fan of the games etc in MWC, and maybe would like MM more since it is straight forward. I guess I may have to play around with it. It seems like MWC is not suggested for math gifted kids though, so I am nervous. 

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47 minutes ago, Noelles said:

Honestly he isnt a huge fan of the games etc in MWC, and maybe would like MM more since it is straight forward. I guess I may have to play around with it. It seems like MWC is not suggested for math gifted kids though, so I am nervous. 

My thought is MWC is a solid math curriculum. That said I didn't continue with it for either of my children, both are advanced for math (one who seriously blows my mind and the other who math is just not a difficult topic).

For my math whiz, we couldn't even use Singapore math because he would complain that having "lessons" (the part where I go over what we are doing that day) was too "annoying" for him. He prefers to get a page of problems and ask me for help only if he doesn't know how to do it. Definitely there are some concepts that he doesn't need explicit instruction at all. (FWIW we use Beast Academy for him because most days that's just handing him the page of scaffolded problems.)

My math comes easily student, she did MWC K, and she was fine with it. We just would sometimes do more than 1 day's worth of lessons per day. The part that makes me nervous and not continue is that it's only out until 3rd (or at the time 2nd) grade. That makes me nervous because I've had curriculum not come out according to schedule and I have to switch, so I opted to just move to Singapore because it has all the levels.   

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I was planning to add Beast Academy in as well. We will see what he thinks of that.

I feel like MWC is great for someone who isn't math minded, but it just honestly feels so easy. I'll see what I decide on once school starts I guess. 

I was looking at Singapore, but decided on Math Mammoth as my other choice instead. 😬

Edited by Noelles
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15 minutes ago, Noelles said:

I was planning to add Beast Academy in as well. We will see what he thinks of that.

Just my opinion, I wouldn't add too many full math curricula together. (MM is a full math curriculum; BA is a full math curriculum.) He's already good at math just give him some samples of the math curricula you are thinking about and see which style jives with him. He probably doesn't need that much math and that time could be better spent elsewhere even if it's just more playtime.

Edited by Clarita
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2 hours ago, Noelles said:

Honestly he isnt a huge fan of the games etc in MWC, and maybe would like MM more since it is straight forward.

We used MWC K and then switched to MM 1. Not because I didn't like MWC K though, it's solid and fun. I switched because I have 4 kids and it felt too teacher intensive in the long run. MM I can just hand to her (she can read the directions). Plus, I would rather play real card games that involve math than "schooly" math games.

ETA: We read the BA comics for fun but don't do the workbooks.

Edited by Momof4sweetkids
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24 minutes ago, Clarita said:

I'm saying you don't need BA as supplement. It won't add anything to his life.

Maybe I should be more clear about this. Math comes easily to some because they naturally or easily see the connections in numbers... things... quantities. So with zero encouragement they would naturally find math puzzles and things in their play to figure out (board games, games, legos, cars, playing with toys, video games, etc.). To me adding supplemental "fun" math to school time takes away time from their own math explorations. The benefit of having personal math exploration/fun vs. teacher-led math exploration/fun is personal math exploration leads one to realize or know that they don't need explicit guidance for this. It gives children the freedom and knowledge that they can find their methodologies and prove they work. 

In fact, DH, DS and I will seek out math puzzles to do for fun all on our own. Our family will go do an escape room where DS will run off and do the puzzles on his own without telling the adults. DS will pick out puzzle and riddle books from the library to do in his free time. We all zone out to figure out how to do math problems in different ways for no reason. 

Just now, Noelles said:

Oh. I see that suggested everywhere for mathy kids, because the math is different.

If a child is mathy they will find the BA methodologies on their own (maybe not all of them and maybe different ones in addition). If the mathy people look deeply into the math taught in BA they will realize some of it is the stuff they use to make math easier for themselves and why they can do the problems in their head easily. 

My philosophy on math is I only supplement math when a student is struggling. 

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