Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

bttrflyvld

what is Saxon math intermediate 3 & 4?

Recommended Posts

My daughter is working through saxon 3 right now. She is doing good with it and we really like it. I'm trying to figure out what is next for her.

 

I have no doubt she'll be ready for the concepts in saxon 5/4, but she struggles with writing. I have already purchaced 5/4 so i could check it out.

 

Can something chime in how intermediate 3 & 4 are? Concepts compared to 5/4. Are problems written out like in saxon 3?

 

I'm worried that more writing will hold her back from learning in 5/4. I Guess as a last resort i could transcribe her math problems for her and she can just write the answers. Suggestions?

 

Sent from my LG-K540 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't used Saxon Intermediate but I almost did this year. I think Christian Book has a video of the differences on their website.

 

I think the Intermediate series is supposed to have more focus on problem solving.

 

Intermediate 4 corresponds to 54. Intermediate 5 Corresponds to 65.

 

Since I have a kid with writing issues, the lure of the Intermediate course for me is the adaptation workbook because without it the student is expected to copy out the problems into a notebook.

 

You should be able to see samples of them on Rainbow Resource or Christian Book, both textbook and adaptation workbook (not written practice workbook which doesn't leave much space).

 

You'll still need the textbook but the adaptation workbook provides more space for writing out the problems as well as some supports. Sometimes problems are completely written out. Sometimes you have to look at the textbook to get additional information to complete the problem.

 

I was just looking at Saxon Course 1, which is the middle school level of the same series, and the corresponding adaptations workbook and thinking I might just be better off transcribing the problems.

 

For the first time this week, I started transcribing the problems from Singapore. But in doing so, I looked more closely at the book and realized after we finish multi digit multiplication and division, it doesn't really come up again for awhile. (Well, I really have to look at the reviews to make sure.) I think my dd is really going to see it often to retain it, so I started looking at Saxon again. I'm also tired of juggling textbook, workbook, intensive practice, and now transcribing. At least with Saxon, all you need is right there. CLE is the same.

Edited by Tiramisu
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to do a thorough comparison, Saxon Intermediate 3-5 used to be online in a pdf format. Try a few different Google searches, but you should be able to find them.

(I used to have them saved, but don't any longer...)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saxon Intermediate 4 is the school version of Saxon 4/5. The problems are almost identical except the intermediate version has an early finisher problem at the end of some lessons that is interesting. You can search online for Saxon intermediate 4 to preview the books because many schools have links to the books so their students can review them at home. (If you can't find a link, pm me and I can help you. Since they are copyrighted I prefer not to provide a link here). I prefer the Intermediate version because it has a workbook. The regular workbook has the exact same 30 problem mixed review set that is in the book. The workbook is around 12 dollars. My son can write in the answer to many of the problems directly into the workbook. Some of the longer computation problems I write out for him on grid paper. I would rather he spend his time solving problems than transcribing them.

Saxon intermediate 5 is Saxon 6/5

Saxon Course 1 is Saxon 7/6

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the pdf. It was helpful. Let me see if i have this correct.

 

So they are basically the same with the exception of intermediate having more problem solving and it had workbook with the problems already written out?

 

Sent from my LG-K540 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the pdf. It was helpful. Let me see if i have this correct.

 

So they are basically the same with the exception of intermediate having more problem solving and it had workbook with the problems already written out?

 

Sent from my LG-K540 using Tapatalk

There are actually two types of workbooks. One is called written practice and has little space for writing. The adaptations workbook has basic instruction and other helps and much more spaces for working out problems. The written practice workbook is less expensive with fewer pages obviously.

 

With the Intermediate series, if you continue to the Course series and do it at grade level, presumably algebra would be reached by ninth grade. With the Saxon traditional series, it might be the same, but there seems to be more flexibility merely because of the way they are numbered. Of course, either series can be used how we like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tiramisu has a great explanation about the adaptation workbook. I will just add that it was designed for kids with learning disabilities who need help keeping up with the class. So the adaptation workbook provides several hints. I almost bought it, but I feel it gives away too much information for someone who isn't struggling. With the regular workbook, there is space to answer many of the problems.

I just looked at my son's intermediate 4 workbook to see how many problems I wrote out and it depends on the lesson. Up through around lesson 50 he was able to write the answer to almost all of the problems directly into the workbook. By lesson 70 I was writing out about 10 to 15 problems on grid paper so he would learn to align the problems. (Ex. Lesson 71 he solved problems 1-11 in the workbook, I wrote out problems 12-21 on grid paper- multi digit multiplication/long division he needed more space as well as problems written horizontally) then he solved 22-30 in the book). He was 8 at the time and it would have taken too much time to write out the problems.

 

ETA: this is the graph paper I used. It is fantastic. http://www.rainbowresource.com/product/sku/027416

Edited by Nart
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...