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Bilingual (Sp/En) Language Arts Planning


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#1 Slache

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 05:30 AM

I'm collecting thoughts and resources for this. Have you gone before me and blazed a trail? What did you learn?

#2 Monica_in_Switzerland

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 06:15 AM

I pretty much teach the grammar of the more complicated language- for us that's French- and occasionally tag on something like, "Oh, it's called ____ in English by the way."  Teaching one grammar is really enough.  We taught reading in both languages, with a gap of about 6-12 months between starts.  So for the first two, we taught English reading, then 6+ months later, taught French reading.  For the third, we are teaching French reading first, then English.  

 

Spelling we do in both languages (I have terrible spellers).

Writing- we emphasize French because we have homeschool inspections in French, but generally we alternate and write in both languages.  I generally teach the same concept- i.e. write a portrait of a person- then have them do examples in both languages because obviously the content/style transfers.  

 


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#3 Slache

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 06:20 AM

I pretty much teach the grammar of the more complicated language- for us that's French- and occasionally tag on something like, "Oh, it's called ____ in English by the way." Teaching one grammar is really enough. We taught reading in both languages, with a gap of about 6-12 months between starts. So for the first two, we taught English reading, then 6+ months later, taught French reading. For the third, we are teaching French reading first, then English.

Spelling we do in both languages (I have terrible spellers).
Writing- we emphasize French because we have homeschool inspections in French, but generally we alternate and write in both languages. I generally teach the same concept- i.e. write a portrait of a person- then have them do examples in both languages because obviously the content/style transfers.


It's my intention to teach reading in Spanish and then spelling in English. I also plan to rotate grammars. I am extremely uncomfortable with grammar.

#4 RenaInTexas

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 06:02 PM

We use:

 

MCT to teach English grammar and writing

Spanish for Children for Spanish grammar and writing

Rosetta Homeschool Spanish for speaking

RAZ Plus / Public Library for Spanish reading

 

We are all English speakers. DH took Spanish in high school. I did not. We just started year two and it is working nicely. The boys speak to each other in Spanish while playing -- without being asked to do so -- and they are picking up on conversations that Spanish speakers are having in the store.



#5 Slache

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 02:40 PM

I won't be able to actually update this for years so I'll give my intentions.

 

-Reading first with La Pata Pita followed by spelling with Reading Lessons Through Literature.

-MCT for vocabulary.

-Most likely focusing on Castilian grammar as it's the most complex.

-Literature and Writing across the curriculum hand selected by mom. I plan to use products like Teaching The Classics, Teaching Writing With structure & Style and The Writer's Jungle so we aren't limited to one language or subject.



#6 Renai

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 09:56 PM

If you are referring to Castilian as to what is spoken in some parts of Spain, there is no advantage to focusing on the most complex grammar. Focus on the most common.

#7 Slache

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:22 PM

If you are referring to Castilian as to what is spoken in some parts of Spain, there is no advantage to focusing on the most complex grammar. Focus on the most common.

 

Yeah, I'm torn. I see both sides.