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How easy is it to update an admissions application?


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#1 KarenNC

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 12:00 AM

Over the past couple of weeks my daughter has worked diligently to get all of her admissions applications in (still has to do scholarship ones) and this morning I mailed out my counselor packets to all the schools (no Common App available). Naturally, therefore, this evening she gets a call offering her a part-time job in the church nursery!

 

So, how easy is it to update an application that was just sent in? What's the best way to update? 



#2 Gr8lander

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 12:08 AM

Generally you e-mail an admissions officer at the school with the update. There should be instructions on the school website, or call the admissions office and ask.


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#3 regentrude

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 08:47 PM

If it's a school that wants paper packets, you probably have to snail mail a letter with the changes. I would only do this if there were a major thing like getting National Merit or placing at math olympiad.

Email the admissions office and ask what they prefer.


Edited by regentrude, 09 September 2017 - 08:48 PM.


#4 JanetC

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 05:17 PM

You don't want to update constantly and I agree with above that this isn't an accomplishment that's likely to make or break a decision. Keep a list and update with multiple things at a time, as needed.
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#5 KarenNC

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 10:32 PM

You don't want to update constantly and I agree with above that this isn't an accomplishment that's likely to make or break a decision. Keep a list and update with multiple things at a time, as needed.

 

I wasn't planning on updating "constantly" but providing this single additional piece of information, which we would have included in the application if it had happened a few days earlier, to application files that are still being assembled and well before the deadline for the applications to be reviewed. They are all waiting on at least her DE transcript and, in most cases, recommendation letters. IMO, it is much more like providing the transcript from an additional program than wanting to add a book to a book list every time she reads something. This is a major change in status for one of her primary volunteer/community service activities, in moving from volunteering to being invited to be one of the two paid leads for that situation, something that is not typically offered to a highschooler in that institution. 

 

I honestly don't expect this to impact admission decisions, but think it could be a factor in scholarship competitions/decisions. Her GPA and test scores put her very much in the running for top merit aid at all the schools (up to and including a full ride), but that aid is not automatic. I realize that most of these decisions will hinge on scholarship weekends at most of the schools, but some of the schools in question do not have those or a separate scholarship application. 

 

So, that brings a question. You mention "multiple things"---what types of things are generally considered worth adding, other than receiving a national award? At what point in the process would you suggest sending in such information?  If her application was already complete and being/had been reviewed, I would probably see it as something to include with the end of semester grade updates, but that's not the case.



#6 Gr8lander

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 01:02 AM

I don't think you need to wait for multiple things on an application update.

 

However, the reason that I, personally, would probably not worry about updating applications with this particular piece of information is that it is only an offer at this point, and she has not actually worked in the position. By the time she has significant hours there as an employee, decisions re: scholarships and admissions are likely made. Her volunteer hours are probably going to get her more consideration for scholarships than this becoming a paid position will.

 

Is anyone from the nursery program going to be writing a letter of recommendation? If so, I would have her request that they mention that she excelled as a volunteer, and it led to this recent job offer.

 

I would update an application for a major award or honor (National Merit, perhaps being chosen as a team captain or club officer, earning Eagle Scout or Girl Scouts Gold Award) or a big win of some sort, be it athletic (state champion in...whatever) or academic. Even those things are unlikely to be a "make or break" factor though. The student's "story" is mostly written in those first three years of high school, as far as college admissions go. However, I tend to recommend most people hold off on submitting apps until a bit later in the fall as some of these senior honors and activities develop.

 

 


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#7 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 04:28 AM

I agree with gr8lander. I would not send in this info bc it is highly doubtful that it will make any impact at all.

The only exception I might see would be if her essay revolved around her volunteer work there. If it was a huge focus in her application, she could contact her specific admissions officer via email and say something along the lines of "May I add an addendum to my essay? They offered me a job!" But,even so, I would hesitate.

Fwiw, I wouldn't do anything anyway. I would expect my dd to do it. That is definitely her role. She should contact them and figure this out bc a high school counselor would not be updating that sort of info. Even with major academic-type award updates I would have my kids do the update.

The word of caution you are receiving is bc remember that admissions is national/international. If other students are updating with national/international level awards, her update may do more harm than good. They have a lot of info from students. You don't want them to respond negatively to being contacted to review and an update to a file.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart, 11 September 2017 - 04:31 AM.

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#8 Milknhoney

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 01:53 PM

Just a suggestion as one who works in an admissions office. Maybe it would make a difference at a highly competitive school, but at my school, the admissions decision is 97% gpa and SAT/ACT score. The only time that sort of thing comes into play is when the student is very borderline academically, and we are looking for other indications that the student has the ability to be successful. And even then, the volunteer experience would fulfill that. Scholarships are also GPA/test score based. 

 

However, I do think there is value in developing a relationship with your admissions counselor. So I see this as an excuse for your daughter to make contact with her counselor. Find out who it is, and send an email asking if this information should/could be added. It most likely won't make any difference in her admissions decision, but now she's opened up a line of communication with her counselor. Now she'll feel more comfortable emailing or calling with a future question. The counselor will start to recognize her name and remember who she is. This probably won't make any difference on her admission, but there's always an advantage to knowing that you have someone you can turn to when you have a question or need help. And occasionally the director of admission will send out an email to the staff such as, "do you have any students who missed the cut for scholarships that you feel should be considered?" And the ones who have made personal contact are the ones who will pop into the counselor's mind. 


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#9 Gr8lander

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:06 PM

 

However, I do think there is value in developing a relationship with your admissions counselor. So I see this as an excuse for your daughter to make contact with her counselor. Find out who it is, and send an email asking if this information should/could be added. It most likely won't make any difference in her admissions decision, but now she's opened up a line of communication with her counselor. Now she'll feel more comfortable emailing or calling with a future question. The counselor will start to recognize her name and remember who she is. This probably won't make any difference on her admission, but there's always an advantage to knowing that you have someone you can turn to when you have a question or need help. And occasionally the director of admission will send out an email to the staff such as, "do you have any students who missed the cut for scholarships that you feel should be considered?" And the ones who have made personal contact are the ones who will pop into the counselor's mind. 

 

This is a good point. Reaching out to the admissions office with a polite, well thought out question is a way of showing interest, which could help in the process.