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All About Spelling VS Spelling You See


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#1 lloomis

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 09:05 AM

Hello!

 

I was wondering if anyone would offer me any insight on AAS vs. SYS. My son is 7 and a proficient reader which I know doesn't necessarily correlate to a good speller.  In his case, he is. At his last assessment, he was able to decode words on almost a 7th grade level.  Please know, this isn't a bragging statement.  I'm thoroughly confused on what to do next. Last year, we used the spelling from Sonlight's Language Arts 2 program. Although spelling was a non-issue, he is a reluctant writer so I felt like this level was a bit advanced in terms of writing whereas the spelling offered zero challenge. We've decided to elevate to the next level of the language arts when the time comes because eventually he will get more comfortable with writing and we will go at his pace which is paramount because he is a perfectionist. So, I wanted to find a different spelling program to add to their language arts program. We haven't used AAS and starting from the beginning as they recommend (but I fully understand not missing foundational information) will be a challenge for him because he will get bored.  I recently looked into SYS. I was very excited about it until I gave him the assessment. According to their guidelines, he will be at the last level which I worry about putting that pressure on a just turned 7 year old.  It's like the language arts 2 we were doing with him when he was 6....he comprehends, he reads beyond that level, he spells every word correctly the first time but his brain wasn't mature enough to handle the workload so he got frustrated and discouraged. My daughter is 5 1/2 and appears to be reluctant reader therefore I won't have a problem placing her in a level but again, I'm having trouble deciding between the 2 programs. My father was taught sight words and to this day, if it's not a word he recognizes, he doesn't have the skills or confidence to break it down therefore learning new things or expanding on new ideas is a challenge for him so he doesn't read anything he doesn't have to. This breaks my heart because I'm a lover of books and I'm raising little bookheads so I want to make sure my daughter doesn't get stuck in the mindset as my dad. That's what appealed to me about AAS BUT since she is a reluctant reader, SYS seems like it would engage her.  I apologize for such a lengthy post! I appreciate you taking the time to read it and value any advice you would share.

 

Have a great day!!!



#2 dragonflyer

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 10:07 AM

I have a really strong reader who is good at spelling. I started at the beginning of AAS in Kindergarten and used the spelling lists mostly for dictation and writing practice starting in Kindergarten.  We have gone through the levels quickly. Starting in the middle of Level 2, AAS introduces dictation phrases, quickly moving into dictation sentences. I mostly go over the rule of the lesson, dictate the words to reinforce the lesson, then use the dictation sentences to increase writing stamina, reinforce spelling, introduce basic punctuation and capitalization, and review handwriting. Last year (2nd grade) we only did spelling twice a week. Using it this way, I just buy the teacher's manual used because the dictation sentences are the meat of how I use the program. It has given me a bit more confidence that we are covering the phonics rules, but not spending a lot of time focusing on an area where he is strong.

I have no experience with SYS.

Hope that helps and you figure out what your kiddo needs.


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#3 Jess4879

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 10:09 AM

I wouldn't use a reading or a spelling program with your son.  I'd just read, read, read.  For your daughter, I wouldn't call her reluctant at this age.  I'd just continue with a phonics program and move at her pace.  I wouldn't add in spelling at all until she is reading well. 


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#4 Lace

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 11:42 AM

I don't think I'd bother with a spelling curriculum for a young child who can spell well beyond grade level.  He's likely to continue picking up new spellings without direct instruction as he already has.

 

I recently bought SYS after seeing at a HS convention for my very reluctant to write (dysgraphia) but reading at a high school level DS.  However, his higher reading level has not corresponded to a high spelling level.  My younger HSer probably doesn't require spelling instruction, but SYS is more enjoyable for practicing handwriting than HWOT and makes copywork more engaging.  I figure doing it won't hurt anything.

 

I had AAS checked out from our HS charter all year, but we didn't ever manage to get it done.  We've done about a week of lessons from SYS and so far it's going alright.  DS#1 loves the 10 minute time limit, anyway, lol.

 

I don't think you'd have trouble with SYS encouraging sight word reading, but it also isn't going to teach phonics.  SYS doesn't teach reading at all.  The lowest levels spend time on phonetic spelling (easy words like cat, rug, etc.), but the emphasis is more on noticing the visual patterns of each word through chunking and repetition.  

 

In level B, you read a rhyme with them, then they use part of it as copywork, and then they write words from dictation (with steadily decreasing scaffolding) while saying the sounds as they write each letter.  Chunking (highlighting certain groups of letters in specific colors) begins somewhere near the middle of the course.  In level C, you read the passage together, they chunk the passage, and then they do copywork for the first several days of the week and later in the week they write the same passage from dictation.  It's very gentle dictation (at this level, at least) with you giving them only one word at a time and helping where ever they need it.  Those are the only levels I've looked at closely.

 

Have you read their FAQs page?  https://spellingyousee.com/faqs/


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#5 nixpix5

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 12:24 PM

I don't think I'd bother with a spelling curriculum for a young child who can spell well beyond grade level. He's likely to continue picking up new spellings without direct instruction as he already has.

I recently bought SYS after seeing at a HS convention for my very reluctant to write (dysgraphia) but reading at a high school level DS. However, his higher reading level has not corresponded to a high spelling level. My younger HSer probably doesn't require spelling instruction, but SYS is more enjoyable for practicing handwriting than HWOT and makes copywork more engaging. I figure doing it won't hurt anything.

I had AAS checked out from our HS charter all year, but we didn't ever manage to get it done. We've done about a week of lessons from SYS and so far it's going alright. DS#1 loves the 10 minute time limit, anyway, lol.

I don't think you'd have trouble with SYS encouraging sight word reading, but it also isn't going to teach phonics. SYS doesn't teach reading at all. The lowest levels spend time on phonetic spelling (easy words like cat, rug, etc.), but the emphasis is more on noticing the visual patterns of each word through chunking and repetition.

In level B, you read a rhyme with them, then they use part of it as copywork, and then they write words from dictation (with steadily decreasing scaffolding) while saying the sounds as they write each letter. Chunking (highlighting certain groups of letters in specific colors) begins somewhere near the middle of the course. In level C, you read the passage together, they chunk the passage, and then they do copywork for the first several days of the week and later in the week they write the same passage from dictation. It's very gentle dictation (at this level, at least) with you giving them only one word at a time and helping where ever they need it. Those are the only levels I've looked at closely.

Have you read their FAQs page? https://spellingyousee.com/faqs/


I was just going to say this. We have used both. AAS is great for kids who are not natural spellers. Natural spellers seem to pick up rules readily by reading and writing which makes SYS a good fit if you want something for your son. We love it here. It definitely gets the job done. We first started using it after reading on Confessions of a Homeschooler that her kids scored low in spelling on their standardized exam and after doing SYS things improved. I think as parents on this board we believe, for the most part, that copywork and dictation are powerful teaching tools. SYS utilizes this but in a fun way.

For your 5 year old I might hold off. If you have a phonics program going then you can always have her spell words on a white board as you do lessons as you go.

#6 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 09:07 PM

Agreeing with the others.  Don't use a detailed spelling program with this child.  Just continue the reading and periodically writing.  Maybe a daily journal of one or two sentences if he is interested.  Or some very basic note taking.  It looks like he will pick up spelling just fine on his own.  AAS and SYS are for kids that don't automatically pick up spelling on their own.  Further down the line he might do well with a Latin and Greek root word program but right now I don't think a formal spelling program is needed at all.

 

Same with your younger, she is young.  Just read to her and with her as her own reading improves, maybe give her ample opportunity to listen to audio books, but exposure to books will be the biggest help.  You can roll in a formal spelling program when she is a bit older if it looks like she will need it.