Jump to content

What's with the ads?


Photo

Highschool IHIP NY


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
8 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 Mom25girls

Mom25girls

    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 311 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 09:26 AM

Hi.
I'm a new reader to the High School Board. We're concluding our tenth year homeschooling and my oldest daughter will begin 9th grade next year. I'm more than a tad bit apprehensive about the High School paperwork. I'm wondering how the IHIP is different, how the Quarterly Updates differ, etc.
I'd really appreciate any help.
Thank you,
Michele
(aka "Mommy" to an 8th, 2nd, 1st, K and preschooler)

#2 ChrisN in NY

ChrisN in NY

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 714 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 02:22 PM

I didn't change my paperwork very much at all for high school.

If you look at the NY regs, you'll see which subjects are required; you definitely have to make sure those are covered.

You can either limit yourself to those required credits, or, if you'll be asking your superintendent for a letter that states your student has completed an equivalent high school eduction (for college acceptance/entrance -- especially to a cc or a state school), you can include the other subjects you're covering that will be included on the transcript.

Otherwise, I used the same format for my IHIPs and quarterlies, the same general descriptions of work covered (usually so many chapters or lessons), and a grade for each subject.

Does this help?

FWIW, this is our 17th homeschool year. My first ds graduated in '06, and I have a senior and a junior this year, plus three younger ones. ;)

#3 newsong

newsong

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 157 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 03:20 PM

I agree with Chris. The only change we made was to switch to a A-F grading system (although I think I wish I could feel good about P/F). Up to high school we use excellent, good, fair, poor for assessment. Also, don't feel as though you need to report hours spent per subject. Just continue to note the total hours per quarter, which rounds to 248. I didn't know this with our first high schooler and I painfully tried to keep track of and report the hours in each subject.

With our oldest, now graduated, we stopped reporting after he turned 16 but that was just before the new requirements regarding college matriculation came into play. Our second oldest will turn 16 this summer. The attendance requirements also changed. Since his birthday falls in August, which is between July 1-June 30 school year I must file reports for his entire junior year. It used to be where you only had to file up to the 16th birthday.

My ds is planning to go to a SUNY school for his first two years so we may end up filing through his senior year in order to be eligible for the superintendent's letter. I'd rather just be done but we'll weigh the options. He's also hoping to start dual enrollment next year so that may come into play since that also has to be superintendent approved. You know, either they are able to do the work or they aren't, so all the hoop jumping is a bit annoying. But hopefully it'll all go smoothly.

Blessings,
Sandy

#4 Mommyfaithe

Mommyfaithe

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8138 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 04:50 PM

Your IHIP's and quarterlies will basically be the same.
Use your same heading and dates for submissions

You will use the same amount of hours...275+

I name my courses in highschool and I tell them how many units we will complete.
Because we now have an option for a Letter of Completion which will be accepted by the CC without a GED, I am much more careful to keep my credits together...IOW: My ds's IHIP will look something like this in the fall

English 1 (1 Unit):
Modern Literature Omnibus 3 Primary and secondary literature with Online Scholars Course Veritas Press and required literature

Vocabulary Cartoons

U.S. Based History Lessons 1 & 2 Institute for Excellence in Writing


Mathematics (1 Unit)
Jacob's Geometry w/ Veritas press Online tutorial


Science (1 Unit)
Advanced Biology w/ Lab Exploring Creation Series Advanced Biology "Fearfully and Wonderfully Made" and Biology Coloring Book Apologia Ministries Press

History (1/2 Unit U.S. History, 1/2 Unit World History) Modern History
Omnibus 3 with online tutorial
Western Civilization , Spielvogel, (resource)
American Nation (resource)
Library, internet and other resources

Theology (1 Unit elective) Omnibus 3 w/ Online tutorial

Logic (1 Unit elective) Traditional Logic 1 & 2 Memoria Press w/ DVD lectures

Foreign Language:(1 Unit) Powerglide Spanish. Library resources and other media

Health/ Physical Education (1 Unit)
U.S. Swim Team, D.U.S.O Swim League, ESSL Swim League. Will include health topics including but not limited to sports injury prevention, nutrition, drug abuse resistance.

Total:8 Units


This is a really heavy load considering the amount of time involved in swimming and other areas of interest, but this guy needs a challenge or he is going to get bored.

For my other kids who have been through high school, we completed about 6 units per year and STILL havd way more than the 18 required once we added it all up. I also like to get a ton of required units finished by 10th grade so my kids can focus on their weak spots and hone their interests.

Good Luck,
Faithe

#5 Cindy in NY

Cindy in NY

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 395 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 06:04 PM

Is this Letter of Completion new? I have a 22 year old and when I graduated him, he had to go the GED route for college. This is the first I have heard of a letter from the superintendent. I have younger kids still homeschooling so i am really interested in a different option. Is there info on this somewhere I can read?

#6 percytruffle

percytruffle

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1606 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 06:26 PM

It's relatively new. Below are the regs from the NYHEN website. Note #4 under Suggested Strategies.

We chose to have dd take the 24 credit hours of courses at the cc instead. They will then grant her something along the lines of a GED without having to take the test. The credits are for courses she needs for her major anyway. I don't trust the letter from the superintendent route, personally. I've seen lack of certification backfire on folks in NY before. As you see, he/she is under no obligation to write it and I don't want to deal with them all the way through high school. When the dc turn 16, we are so ready to be done with the school district! We have to submit an IHIP for the complete year they turn 16, but I didn't keep sending the quarterlies after their birthday.

College Entrance

70. If home-instructed students cannot be awarded local or Regents high school diplomas, how can they gain entrance to colleges?
First, please note that seeking admission to college is entirely a choice that students make, and successfully gaining admission to college is entirely the responsibility of home-instructed students and their parents. It is not the responsibility of the State Education Department or the local public school district to secure college admission for home-instructed students.

Secondly, colleges set their own admissions requirements. These requirements vary from college to college. The burden, therefore, is on home-instructed students (and their parents) to seek and acquire information on the admissions requirements of the colleges of their choice. The burden is also on home-instructed students (and their parents) to convince colleges to accept them. Because of this, home-instructed students (and their parents) may wish to seek information regarding the admissions requirements of the colleges of their choice well in advance of the actual application for admission.

Third, listed below are some suggested strategies for home-instructed students (and their parents) to consider using to help them gain entrance to colleges. Consideration can be given to using a combination of these strategies. Please note that there is no guarantee that following any or all of the strategies listed below will ensure a home-instructed student's admission to any college. Again, if home-instructing students choose to pursue admission to college, they (and their parents) are fully responsible for this.

Suggested Strategies

1. A portfolio of the student's work, demonstrating its breadth and depth, might be developed over time. This portfolio can be shared with college admissions personnel to demonstrate the student's capabilities.

2. If a home-instructed student has taken Regents exams at the public school of residence, he/she can request the public school district to produce, on school letterhead, a list of the exams taken, the date on which they were taken, and the score the student earned. This list of Regents exam scores can be shared with college admissions personnel.

3. Home-instructed students can take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and/or other standardized tests used for college admissions purposes. Scores on these tests can be shared with college admissions personnel. Home-instructed students should contact their public school district about arrangements for taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test and/or achievement examinations offered by the College Board or the American College Testing Service.

4. If the student is beyond the age of compulsory education, and has completed a program of home instruction in compliance with Section 100.10 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, he/she can request that the superintendent of schools of the public school district of residence attest to this, in writing, on district letterhead. This can be shared with college admissions personnel. Please note, however, that the superintendent of schools may, but is under no obligation to, attest to this.

5. Home-instructed students can take the GED exam, when they have reached eligibility to do so. Students passing the GED exam can share their General Equivalency Diplomas with college admissions personnel.

#7 Mom25girls

Mom25girls

    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 311 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 07:34 PM

Oh..Thank you so much for your collective wisdom. I'm not sure WHY I'm really nervous about High School. I use a version of our District's IEP which I created years ago for quarterlies and my paperwork is quick, easy and very uneventful. I'm I just don't know if diplomas are necessary, not sure how to handle the "half year straddle" my dd has developed in Math (she is doing Jacob's Geometry now but will be done around Dec/Jan...). Our district is NOT homeschool friendly and I think they've been recently audited. Thanks for your help.
:)Michele (still stressing but a little bit calmer now)
(aka "Mommy" to an 8th, 2nd, 1st, K and preschooler)

#8 Cindy in NY

Cindy in NY

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 395 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 07:39 PM

Thanks Percytruffle,

It looks like not much has changed. I agree with being done with the scholl district as soon as you can. The reporting does get old.
From my experience with the school districts we have lived in, I wouldn't count on anything from the Superintendent. Ours have been no problem, but certainly no help.

#9 Mommyfaithe

Mommyfaithe

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8138 posts

Posted 14 April 2008 - 08:19 PM

Oh..Thank you so much for your collective wisdom. I'm not sure WHY I'm really nervous about High School. I use a version of our District's IEP which I created years ago for quarterlies and my paperwork is quick, easy and very uneventful. I'm I just don't know if diplomas are necessary, not sure how to handle the "half year straddle" my dd has developed in Math (she is doing Jacob's Geometry now but will be done around Dec/Jan...). Our district is NOT homeschool friendly and I think they've been recently audited. Thanks for your help.
:)Michele (still stressing but a little bit calmer now)
(aka "Mommy" to an 8th, 2nd, 1st, K and preschooler)


Don't worry about the 1/2 year hurdle. For a full Unit course just track the year it was completed...SO...Geometry will be 9th grade ...then if you begin Algebra 2 in Jan...count the unit when it is completed.

Also, you can count 1/2 credits...or if you like, even 1/4 units that add up to a whole unit.

The regs. are rigid, but flexible , if you know what I mean....

``Faithe


What's with the ads?