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Megicce

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About Megicce

  • Rank
    Hive Mind Worker Bee

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    Birth, parenting, nutrition, psychology, languages, educational philosophy, endocrinology, origins theory, music, and creative writing.

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  • Location
    North of Seattle, WA
  • Interests
    Childbirth, nutrition, living and eating chemical-free, learning, writing, languages, and JESUS
  • Occupation
    mama, childbirth and parenting educator

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251 profile views
  1. Ohhhh, these look lovely.... These would definitely speak to my artist daughter. The material might be simple/boring, but I'm really just looking for it to SINK IN as it hasn't before. What is the daily flow like with these curricula? Do they write in the student book, or on a separate piece of paper? How long is a typical lesson (ballpark)? Is there a lot of teacher involvement, or is it more student-directed? I'm just trying to make sure that whatever we land on fits into the flow of our days this coming year. And can I ask those same questions for the vocabulary and poetics books? I l
  2. I need some ideas for grammar for this next year. We've been using FLL all the way through (DS levels 1-3; DD levels 1-4 and then Rod and Staff this year), and I'm having to acknowledge to myself that I just don't think it's working. Both kids can rattle off definitions and lists like nobody's business, but ask them to actually identify parts of speech in a sentence when we HAVEN'T just spent five minutes talking about that part of speech, and they look at me like deer in headlights. My son can easily tell you that "A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought" and "All sen
  3. I need some ideas for grammar for this next year. We've been using FLL all the way through (DS levels 1-3; DD levels 1-4 and then Rod and Staff this year), and I'm having to acknowledge to myself that I just don't think it's working. Both kids can rattle off definitions and lists like nobody's business, but ask them to actually identify parts of speech in a sentence when we HAVEN'T just spent five minutes talking about that part of speech, and they look at me like deer in headlights. My son can easily tell you that "A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought" and "All sen
  4. I'm looking for Christmas gifts for my littles, and I have a bright 7-year-old boy who's reading at about a fifth grade level and fascinated by space. I'd love to find a meaty space encyclopedia with plenty of material for engrossing reading, appropriate for that reading level. Special challenges: We are neither young-earth creationists nor secular, and those seem to be the two versions of such books out there that I'm finding. I'd love to find something that really sticks to the facts of what we know about space, without editorializing on purpose/design/lack of design, and particularly w
  5. We're taking a year off SOTW next year (what would have been SOTW 4) to do a year on American history, and I'm kind of leaning toward using Simply Charlotte Mason's guides. We'd combine the Early Modern and Modern guides and just do the American history portions and North American geography. Thoughts on this curriculum? I know it seems a little lighter, but honestly...I might want to try that for a year. I think it would give us more scope to go off on rabbit trails and linger on things without me worrying that we won't finish. I do plan to "bulk it up" a little by omitting the study of Bi
  6. We have definitely experienced some of this with SOTW3 as well. Thanks for sharing your experience and ideas!
  7. This is exactly what I haven't loved about SOTW3, which is probably also part of my reason for seeking out something more fun and engaging for next year. I'd like to find something that lights my kids up and gets them intrigued and passionate about history, as opposed to leaving them bewildered by a litany of historical events that they (especially the littler one) don't really have the ability to absorb yet. I like your idea about 20th Century heroes and will consider that as an option! Thank you! :)
  8. I'm LOVING all of these ideas; thank you so much, everyone! I am leaning toward taking a year of American history, and I'll check into the resources mentioned. Any other recommendations for good, engaging, one-year American history resources for this age?
  9. Thank you. I appreciate your perspective and experience. I'd still be open to hearing alternative recommendations - I'm not going to shelter them forever, but I'm also weighing maturity and ability to process what we're learning about (mostly for my 7-year-old) and wanting to consider my options. Thanks!
  10. We have been using SOTW and have been largely pleased with it (though tbh SOTW 3 has been more dry), but I'm looking for something different for next year. My primary reason is the content warning on SOTW 4 that it contains material that's difficult (understandably so) and that you may not want to use it with kids younger than 4th grade. We do history with both of my kiddos together, and next year I will have a 4th grader and a sensitive 2nd grader. My idea is to skip SOTW 4 and then jump back into our history rotation with Ancients the following year. I'd be interested in finding either a
  11. This is beautiful. This is how I am learning to survive, too. When my littles were preschoolers, I was so excited about homeschooling and so full of beautiful visions of our idyllic days curled up together with books. Then the rubber met the road. XD This has been the year of me and DH (an ENTP) realizing what a much better mother, homeschooler, and sane human being I am when I get alone time. It has been life-changing to stop fighting how I'm made or wishing I didn't need a break from mothering (like all my ISFJ friends who seem so happy to just hang with the kids all day and bake and take
  12. That's so interesting! You know, I do find that I have to find curricula that teach something in the way I understand it and what works for the kids, and I have a penchant for splicing programs together or designing things myself when I can't find what I want. So in that sense, I can totally relate. Now, I feel like we've found what actually works for us for where we're at. Maybe as I continue to homeschool and get less fearful about improvising and "missing something," we'll find ourselves putting things together more as you did. :)
  13. She's in WWE3 at the moment (we had a move this fall, so she's only about five weeks in atm), but that helps. Asking the leading questions does really seem to help her put it together with WWE. Idk why I didn't think of that with this also. I guess it just seems in the SOTW workbook that kids should be able to pull the salient points out of the air. XD Thank you for that!! Still would love to hear other thoughts and suggestions, especially thoughts about realistic expectations at this age. I tend to be a perfectionist and have to reel in my expectations from time to time.
  14. After doing a lot of the negative process of making choices that Mrs. Tharp mentioned above ("Okay, this sounded good, but REALLY doesn't work"), we've hit on some things that are working for us. I am an INFJ (absolutely no question, by cognitive functions as well as the tests that look only at the four dichotomies) and an adult education professional. I LOVE teaching in classrooms, but I find that with my kids, I do better with a mixture of subjects where I'm teaching hands-on and subjects where they do independent work and I come in as a resource person to support and guide them. I need
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