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Megicce

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About Megicce

  • Rank
    Hive Mind Worker Bee

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    Birth, parenting, nutrition, psychology, languages, educational philosophy, endocrinology, origins theory, music, and creative writing.

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  • Location
    North of Seattle, WA
  • Interests
    Childbirth, nutrition, living and eating chemical-free, learning, writing, languages, and JESUS
  • Occupation
    mama, childbirth and parenting educator

Recent Profile Visitors

240 profile views
  1. Ohhhh, these look lovely.... These would definitely speak to my artist daughter. The material might be simple/boring, but I'm really just looking for it to SINK IN as it hasn't before. What is the daily flow like with these curricula? Do they write in the student book, or on a separate piece of paper? How long is a typical lesson (ballpark)? Is there a lot of teacher involvement, or is it more student-directed? I'm just trying to make sure that whatever we land on fits into the flow of our days this coming year. And can I ask those same questions for the vocabulary and poetics books? I l
  2. I need some ideas for grammar for this next year. We've been using FLL all the way through (DS levels 1-3; DD levels 1-4 and then Rod and Staff this year), and I'm having to acknowledge to myself that I just don't think it's working. Both kids can rattle off definitions and lists like nobody's business, but ask them to actually identify parts of speech in a sentence when we HAVEN'T just spent five minutes talking about that part of speech, and they look at me like deer in headlights. My son can easily tell you that "A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought" and "All sen
  3. I need some ideas for grammar for this next year. We've been using FLL all the way through (DS levels 1-3; DD levels 1-4 and then Rod and Staff this year), and I'm having to acknowledge to myself that I just don't think it's working. Both kids can rattle off definitions and lists like nobody's business, but ask them to actually identify parts of speech in a sentence when we HAVEN'T just spent five minutes talking about that part of speech, and they look at me like deer in headlights. My son can easily tell you that "A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought" and "All sen
  4. I'm looking for Christmas gifts for my littles, and I have a bright 7-year-old boy who's reading at about a fifth grade level and fascinated by space. I'd love to find a meaty space encyclopedia with plenty of material for engrossing reading, appropriate for that reading level. Special challenges: We are neither young-earth creationists nor secular, and those seem to be the two versions of such books out there that I'm finding. I'd love to find something that really sticks to the facts of what we know about space, without editorializing on purpose/design/lack of design, and particularly w
  5. This is beautiful. This is how I am learning to survive, too. When my littles were preschoolers, I was so excited about homeschooling and so full of beautiful visions of our idyllic days curled up together with books. Then the rubber met the road. XD This has been the year of me and DH (an ENTP) realizing what a much better mother, homeschooler, and sane human being I am when I get alone time. It has been life-changing to stop fighting how I'm made or wishing I didn't need a break from mothering (like all my ISFJ friends who seem so happy to just hang with the kids all day and bake and take
  6. Hi there! I have a 2nd grader (reading probably on a 4th-5th grade level? she's very comfortable whipping through Little House, Charlotte's Web, etc.) with a sensitive disposition and an obsession with fairy tales. She'd love more of them to read, and I'd love to steer her away from Disney adaptations and toward something more classic. Unfortunately, I don't know of any good collections apart from the Andrew Lang books (Blue Fairy Book, etc), and from what I have heard ​(I have not read them personally) they can tend toward the grisly/gruesome, which I don't think would be a good fit for her
  7. Hi there! I am deliberating between TOG Yr 2 and SOTW Vol 2 next year for my upcoming 2nd grader and kindergartener. We have used TOG Year 1 this year, but with SOTW Vol 1 as the spine. The kids have really enjoyed and retained a lot from the hands-on projects, but of all the reading we've done, SOTW has definitely been the most enjoyable. I already have TOG Year 2, and I'm looking through it and noticing both that SOTW 2 doesn't seem to be scheduled much (which is disappointing) but also noticing that the 2nd-year scope of the curricula seem very different. I'm trying to decide which to u
  8. We have been using a curriculum aptly named Cursive First. It is designed to be integrated with a related phonics program (Spell to Read and Write), but since we use OPGTR for phonics, we just use what we need. It is intended to be a first handwriting program for kids who are learning cursive before manuscript. (That's what you are looking for, right?) I like how it describes the different strokes and integrates some tactile learning techniques (like writing in the air, in salt, etc before doing the practice sheets). It has been working really well for DD5. Here it is at Rainbow Resource C
  9. Well, so far it seems unanimous! Ok, so reassure me...nothing bad is going to happen if we skip spelling in 1st? DD6 is a prolific book-maker who uses exceptionally...err...creative spelling at the moment, based on the phonics rules she has learned so far and "educated guessing". We are currently learning alternate spellings for the long vowel sounds in OPGTR, so I guess she's a bit ahead by public school standards, but we're not finishing the book before September or anything. It's just, you know, TWTM says to start spelling in 1st, so I'm nervous. (Can you tell she is my oldest? Hah
  10. Hi there! I've been looking into spelling curricula for first grade in the fall and, like others who've posted before me, been trying to find the sweet spot between systematic rule-teaching and minimal teacher time. I have enough hands-on time in other subjects that I need to make spelling as easy as it can be (while still being effective) for the sake of my own sanity! :) So, I think we've settled on Rod & Staff as a program that looks like it will work for us long-term, but it doesn't start until Grade 2! Ack! I looked at the samples, and it does seem like it would be too much for
  11. I love that we're hearing from people with British and Aussie accents, too! Thanks, all of you...my first response was just to explain that sometimes it's yoo and sometimes it's oo and just figure it out - kind of like with the two sounds of th. I appreciate your input!
  12. We've just hit long u (with silent e) in The Ordinary Parent's Guide. The book recommends to teach it as the name of the letter ("yoo"), and to pronounce the words accordingly (like "tyoob" for tube). Trouble is, we don't pronounce things that way. In our family's idiolect, a lot of the long-u words are just "oo" - like "toob" for tube, "joon" for June. My dd is really confused, and I feel like I'm not quite sure how to explain it to her. She'll sound out the word, but then not know what it means, because that's not how we say it. Anybody else deal with this issue, and how did you manage i
  13. Hi there! I asked this over on the Pre-K and K board, but wanted to get the input of the larger hive as well. My DD5 has been doing K4 this year and is writing like crazy - making up spellings for everything. She's quite adamant that her spellings are correct. ;) I wasn't planning to start spelling until 1st grade, but I feel like she's forcing my hand here, and I've started looking into spelling for K, but I feel completely indecisive about what to use. My initial plan was just to use Spelling Workout as recommended in TWTM, but looking at it, I don't think it will be the right fit for he
  14. I have an incoming K5'er who's going nuts with writing everything and using lots of invented spelling. I was planning to wait until 1st grade to start spelling, and was planning on using Spelling Workout, but I think she is forcing my hand here and I'm looking at starting spelling in K instead. (We have been doing K4 with phonics, handwriting, and math.) I'm trying to figure out whether I ought to plan on using All About Spelling, which seems like it might be more appropriate for using with a K'er, or Spelling Workout, which was my initial plan. I really think that AAS would be the better
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