Menu
Jump to content
ATTENTION: Forums search will not work until re-indexing is completed. Please follow these instructions for search
aharrington

Has anyone used Sabbath Mood Science modules?

Recommended Posts

Yes. I am very happy with them. Don't have time to write now, but will later. The first one we used was about planets (my husband studies planets for a living) and he was happy with it. I'll give details later.

 

Emily

BS Applied Physics, hubby PhD Astrophysics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I'm back. :-)

 

We used all the middle school ones this year (biology, astronomy, weather, and physics). I was glad that we were able to start with astronomy, and specifically planets, because that is hubby's field of study and so I knew we could critique it well. :-)

 

Here's what I like:

- there are 33 lessons per module that are mapped out and preplanned (so three a week for 11 weeks + one week of exams or once a week all year + three exam weeks throughout year)

- lessons are about 40 minutes; we do projects together in the evening because involving more of the family makes them more fun

- tie-ins are added, for example, current articles to read or youtube videos to watch

- both good worksheets (not busy work) and simple labs are added in that pertain well to the subject

- there is a list of related living books at the beginning that an excited student could choose to read

- very independent

 

Here's what isn't great:

- I wish she had a better typesetter (minor concern, but still)

- there can be a lot of supplies; when I haven't gathered things, I've sometimes just skipped the lab (the course is meaty even without every lab)

- while the book Planets by Sobel is very recent, some are older; she does generally have information about things she knows has changed, though

 

Could go either way:

- not math intensive; these are definitely conceptual courses!

 

I was a person who had a lousy middle school science foundation but rigorous high school science. What I lacked the most was any sort of conceptual overview. I think these do an excellent job of covering a wide variety of subjects in a way that is interesting and meaningful. Narration is one of the main outputs, so you need to be willing to commit to narration.

 

The guides use secular books but have some optional young earth notes (and a note about GMOs in biology). I've skipped those. Someone who is strongly opposed might even black them out.

 

It is really neat to hear my son talk about physics and to know he gets the big idea, or to understand about a storm front coming in, or to make connections about DNA.

 

Emily

Edited by EmilyGF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Emily -

 

Thanks for the thorough review.  I have purchased Biology and really like the looks of it.   I am wavering between doing what you did this year or using Biology with Elemental Science: Earth.  My son is definitely more math/science oriented but we have yet to find a science curriculum that clicks with him. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Emily -

 

Thanks for the thorough review.  I have purchased Biology and really like the looks of it.   I am wavering between doing what you did this year or using Biology with Elemental Science: Earth.  My son is definitely more math/science oriented but we have yet to find a science curriculum that clicks with him. 

I'd say that's true of my son who is using this, since he's 12y3m and halfway through AOPS Algebra.

 

As someone who was always really good at math, I do see the value of more conceptual science. ​I was good enough at math to fake my way through a lot of physics​. I really wish I had bothered to understand big picture ideas before diving into the math. My husband does this and his PhD advisor actually told him not to apply math (through computer simulations) to his research until he could give an account of what a reasonable result would be. He has his students do this, too, now.

 

So I don't think the lack of math is a problem for a middle school curriculum. I just would consider it a drawback at the high school level or even as a secondary course.

 

Emily

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & RECEIVE A COUPON FOR
10% OFF
We respect your privacy.You’ll hear about new products, special discounts & sales, and homeschooling tips. *Coupon only valid for first-time registrants. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Entering your email address makes you eligible to receive future promotional emails.
0 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin
×