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LEK

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Posts posted by LEK

  1. My youngest is anaphylactic to egg and dairy. We keep both in the house and they are used all the time and I really mean all the time. We are fanatical about preparing, cooking and storing all his food separate and making sure everything is cleaned up asap. Having said that, he could sit right next to you as you eat a huge bowl of egg and cheese with no reaction, if he was to touch it or you touch him with some on your hands then he will react mildy but he is only anaphylactic when he actually eats the food. We have epi pens at the ready at all times but have not had to use one yet.

    He was allergic to tree nuts when he was younger, I banned them from the house at that stage as they are easy to remove and have a greater chance of causing issues without him actually consuming them. Fortunately he has since grown out of that allergy.

    I am allergic to several fruits. Banana, pineapple and peach I still allow into the house as long as people are careful about preparation and cleanup. Kiwi I will not allow into the house, if I so much as touch a drop of kiwi juice it could be serious trouble, it is just not worth that risk.

     

    So, it really depends on the severity of the allergy and what will cause a serious reaction. As my youngest needs to eat the food to have an anaphylactic reaction we are vigilant about his food but the rest of the household still eats those foods daily. As I cannot even touch a kiwi or a drop of juice without a serious reaction that stays out of the house, you never know when someone will let one little drop escape.

    • Like 3
  2. This is the typical daily schedule of my 9yo 4th grade student:

    9am -9:30 independent LA (workbook then reading)

    9:30-10 LA with me, grammar, spelling...

    10-10:30 writing (sometimes independent, sometimes not)

    10:30-11 Break outside

    11-11:15 logic. 3 days a week logic book (currently primarily logic or number junctions), 2 days a week a logic game

    11:15-11:45 Math.

    Morning times are very approximate but above it what it would look like on a day when she is working well and not distracted by anything and everything. Some days she finished all of the above including a half hour of reading and a half hour of math by 11am and had finished her afternoon stuff before lunch, other days she is not done with her morning tasks until 1pm the only difference in those days is her motivation and focus.

     

    After lunch she does 30 minutes to an hour on prodigy and a minimum of half an hour (but can be up to 2 hours) on one of our afternoon topics: science, history, art, cooking.

    It all averages to about 4.5 hours a day including reading and playing the prodigy math game

  3. I am another that really just does not like reading aloud to the kids. As toddlers I like it, I like them snuggling and talking about the pictures etc and their books are short. I do not enjoy reading aloud novels to the older kids, I want to but I just don't, even my favorite books I just do not like reading aloud to them.

    We do however listen to a lot of audio books while driving, and by a lot I mean we go through 2 or more novels on audio every week easily. While I am not reading to them they are listening to books all the time. That will have to do here. I do read to them during school time where the curriculum requires it and if there is a book I really want them to hear and cannot get on audio I will read it aloud but generally I do not read many novel aloud to my kids.

  4. My husband hates them.   With him it is because he is a very fast reader probably 10X the speed of a narrator, so his mind wanders when he listens.  

     

    This is me too, hate them UNLESS I am driving (which I also hate), when I am driving it provides just enough mental stimulation that the driving is more enjoyable while not distracting me. It also keeps the kids quiet and stops them distracting me so win win.

  5. As always, I find myself a little teetering on the subject of "what do you mean by classics?"

     

     

    Lol, I found myself teetering on that particular subject while writing the initial post but could just not come up with anything that better attempted to describe what I was looking for :laugh:

    I guess I am wanting good quality literature that would be suitable for 8-10yo's in terms of content that they will enjoy. Ideally I need some "older" titles, we have read a lot of modern literature but not so many older titles

  6. I have had similar problems with both my older girls. Both are very mathematically minded.

     

    The problem here basically boils down to they are bored, tear inducing bored, however while their mathematical skills are mostly intuitive I feel very strongly that they need to learn the standard conventions and methods and also, some aspects of mathematics is just not picked up through intuition and daily life so they had gaps in their knowledge. For this reason we have been working through our chosen program (at an accelerated speed) to fill in any gaps and teach the more standard conventions. They do not like it and are bored stiff half the time but it has helped them a lot and I feel it will really be beneficial further down the track. One thing that really helps enormously was to let my elder DD do her pages orally where that was appropriate, she can do a page orally in a minute or 2 but due to complaining, snacks, sharpening pencils, drawing and just general distractions that same page easily takes 20+ minutes if I require the answers to be written.

     

    The current "plan" is to finish going through all primary mathematics and then move into AOPS, my DD9 is also using BA as a supplement and she will be starting AOPS prealgebra sometime in the next few months (will definitely be starting it well before her 10th birthday), hopefully this will appeal more to her. She loves playing with numbers and doing "complicated" mathematics, it is the daily lessons that she hates, and I really don't blame her, primary mathematics really is tear inducing boring.

     

    Not sure if that helps but that sums up the situation here. My plan up to this stage really has been just to get them through learning the conventional way of doing things relatively fast so that they can move onto the more challenging and fun stuff that they really want to do, once they have learned the conventional way I really do not care how they work out a problem (their own way or the standard) but in the future knowing that convention will help with algebra and up.

     

  7. What are your favorite classics for ages 8-10 yo? I am wanting to expand their literature exposure but not quite sure where to start. What classic books have your kids enjoyed listening to at this age? My girls will not be reading these books, they will either be read aloud to them or we will get them as audio books to listen to while driving, we do a lot of driving so listen to a lot of audio books but up to this point there really have not been any "classics" in our audio library. Thanks

  8. For books that will not last us an entire year I alternate them one week on and one off (currently grammar one week spelling the next) or do that particular subject only 1-2 days per week (geography and handwriting here).

    That makes the individual days less cluttered and streamlined while pacing the curricula to last for hopefully the entire year.

    Some years we just decide to do 2-3 years worth of a curricula by working daily though but generally I pace it.

    • Like 1
  9. I am after recommendations for the best text books written at an upper middle school/early high school level please. They need to be able to be used independently by the student and must be secular.

    We have holt life science already.

    My dd9 (4th grade) is asking for "adult text books" on science as apparently what we have already is not in depth enough for her and she seems to be left with more questions at the end of a chapter than answers.

    I have quite a number of uni text books in chemistry and several biology fields however she is not at that level yet but is well beyond the elementary/early middle school books we have. Any recommendations of where to go from here? Thanks.

  10. I am after recommendations for the best text books written at an upper middle school/early high school level please. They need to be able to be used independently by the student and must be secular.

    We have holt life science already.

    My dd9 (4th grade) is asking for "adult text books" on science as apparently what we have already is not in depth enough for her and she seems to be left with more questions at the end of a chapter than answers.

    I have quite a number of uni text books in chemistry and several biology fields however she is not at that level yet but is well beyond the elementary/early middle school books we have. Any recommendations of where to go from here? Thanks.

  11. Another one who never planned on accelerating, in fact I actually set out to deliberately hold them back as much as possible by really exploring and expanding on topics rather than move on to the next level. Some years my kids did 3 different math programs at the same grade level just to hold them back a little. Well that failed, despite my trying to keep them at lower levels they are working at much higher levels anyway and I have given up holding them back and letting them go for it. both older kiddos (grades 2 and 4) are currently at least 3 grade levels ahead of their age grouping, they can read nearly anything put in front of them and love doing their own research and projects (often using highschool texts) in both science and history. We are still struggling with a couple of areas though, my dd9 (4th grade) is about on target for 4th grade writing so there is a huge difference in her reading/researching and her writing. dd7 (2nd grade) is about 1st grade level in writing and spelling so has an even bigger gap between her abilities. My main goals for school each year for the last few years is to get their writing and spelling more solid, their main goals seem to be to move through 3 levels of math a year and demand harder and harder science books because they have finished them all.

  12. Nerd and geek are an insult here generally. If being called a nerd/geek by someone who is not a nerd or geek that is highly offensive, however if called a nerd or geek by a fellow nerd then that is not only fine but a compliment and sign of solidarity. It really comes down to context but the only acceptable time to use those words here are between groups of friends who all consider themselves to be a nerd or geek.

  13. I really only mark up math tests.  I put a "c" by correct answers and circle incorrect answers.  Then, once the answers have been corrected, I put a fraction above it for the amount of credit I'll give for that corrected answer (generally 3/4 if it was just a silly error and is easily corrected, 1/2 if it was a more serious error and is corrected without any help from me, and 1/4 if she needs a hint on how to correct it and then does it right).  

     

    You give credit for answers that were initially wrong? Is this common? Maybe it is different where you are but here you get 0 for a wrong answer or if showing working out was required up to 1/2 for a problem where the working out was correct but a simple error resulted in an incorrect final answer. I have never heard of giving partial credit on a test to an answer that was initially marked wrong and then re-answered.

  14. This is why we homeschool.

    From my experience IQ testing will not help, schools here are not set up to allow gifted children to accelerate or use alternative resources, having that score will not change the way the school is run or the opportunities they can provide. Even if you do find a school with an accelerated or gifted program it is likely to only be an hour or 2 a week max of alternative work and even then it will not be a sufficient step up in difficulty to provide an actual challenge (just my experience).

    On the other hand homeschooling in australia is great :)

  15. We love prodigy here! My girls beg to use it daily and have been doing really well with it.

    We used just the free site for 2 months in the beginning to make sure they were going to keep going with it, just at the end of that period a local homeschool group organized a group buy so we got memberships, they are even more in love now lol, I was not prepared to pay full price for an online game subscription for 2 kids but the group buy price was about $15 per child for the year, heaps better

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