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I read an article about learning styles. It tested whether students really learn better with their dominant learning style vs strategies from other learning styles. For example visual learners learned a list of words as well as when they were give to them in a written list as a verbal list. I was skimming but I think they found learning style didn't matter.

 

Anyway I can't remember where I read this? Does it sound familar? I think it must have been a recent article somewhere. But where?

 

Thanks.

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I don't know about this - but I know that math was hard for me until I found a teacher who taught it backwards. Only 2 of us in the class liked the guy. It was the first time either of us ever really "got it" and we both made A's.

 

I wish they taught it to me backwards my entire life!

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I read somewhere an article that claimed that "bright" children simply learned to cope with their "non -dominant" learning style well enough to excel in school. Once they've picked this up, they would show similar results.

 

That doesn't really demonstrate how well they could have done, had they been taught using their dominant style from the beginning.

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I don't know about this - but I know that math was hard for me until I found a teacher who taught it backwards. Only 2 of us in the class liked the guy. It was the first time either of us ever really "got it" and we both made A's.

 

I wish they taught it to me backwards my entire life!

 

Can you explain what you mean by backwards?

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I read somewhere an article that claimed that "bright" children simply learned to cope with their "non -dominant" learning style well enough to excel in school. Once they've picked this up, they would show similar results.

 

 

 

I had read this as well. Also, there is research out there that suggests that some information is better assimilated if presented in the manner most appropriate for the material, not necessarily the learner. I have read that a strong preference for one learning style over the others can indicate a processing issue and that it is important to be able to assimilate information suing a variety of styles to insure future success. I've always followed the maxim "teach to the strength, remediate the weakness."

 

I have a son who has always been a very visual learner. He has sensory and auditory processing issues that made it difficult to learn in other ways. We have had to work on the auditory and kinesthetic processing because he will eventually have to function in a world that requires assimilating information presented in a variety of ways (i.e. college lecture for one.)

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I don't know about this - but I know that math was hard for me until I found a teacher who taught it backwards. Only 2 of us in the class liked the guy. It was the first time either of us ever really "got it" and we both made A's.

 

I wish they taught it to me backwards my entire life!

 

I just yesterday met an 11yo old who, who when left to himself, writes his math backwards and he explained his numbers to me with full comprehension. How do you teach math backwards? Do you teach it to your daughter backwards?

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Thanks!

 

Willingham sounds familar so I'm guessing it was an article about him or his book. At least I can now search for it.

 

I had just read a book about how to use learning styles in teaching reading and then read that article that learning styles didn't matter. So I was flummoxed.

 

The experts will probably go back and forth for a few years and then conclude that for some kids learning styles matter and others it doesn't.

 

Thanks again.

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I had read this as well. Also, there is research out there that suggests that some information is better assimilated if presented in the manner most appropriate for the material, not necessarily the learner. I have read that a strong preference for one learning style over the others can indicate a processing issue and that it is important to be able to assimilate information suing a variety of styles to insure future success. I've always followed the maxim "teach to the strength, remediate the weakness."

 

I have a son who has always been a very visual learner. He has sensory and auditory processing issues that made it difficult to learn in other ways. We have had to work on the auditory and kinesthetic processing because he will eventually have to function in a world that requires assimilating information presented in a variety of ways (i.e. college lecture for one.)

 

I agree with this. I think the learning style issue is hyped up in general, but that if you are seeing one dominant style that it is a good idea to look into testing. I've got a son who was/is a phenomenal auditory learner and low and behold, there were significant visual processing problems when I had him tested for something else.

 

I think that presenting info in multiple modes is usually helpful, and yes, there are some subjects that lend themselves better to one mode than another.

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