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If you could have a "do over" for your kids in science, what would you do differently.....AND ......What curriculums would you use to prepare your kids for high school science?

 

Just wondering this morning.....I have two students that are presently in high school and we are moving them toward graduation.....

 

However, I have two more coming along and I am thinking about praying about their paths this morning.

 

We used WTM, LLB, and Rainbow science with the first two to prepare them for high school science. Hmmm......we had fun and they were prepared. But it was a lot of work for mom....trying to find library books and to suppliment. We read and read and read library books.

 

Should I prepare the other two the same way....or use a more text book approach?

 

Am I the only one out there that stresses over these kinds of things? My husband thinks I'm nuts at times......

 

If you had a do over, what would you do differently??

 

Blessings,

 

Brenda:001_smile:

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I am pretty happy with our approach to science. I have done things a little different with each child and formed the program to meet their needs and interests.

 

My oldest probably could have done well with a stronger program in junior high as he likes science. I think more chemistry would have been beneficial for him. We have the RS4K chemistry now for the younger ones, and I think he would have liked it a lot.

 

My second oldest has used the Apologia botany and the zoology 1-3 books. This has been great for her. She loves to read, and these books are strong on reading. I am not sure what she will do as an 8th grade because we have an opportunity for her to take high school bio with a teacher next year. It is either that or she will do RS4K chemistry.

 

Our twins have used a variety of little things over the years. This year they are doing Apologia Astronomy. They like it. One of the girls is very interested in hands on activities which is a little out of my comfort zone, but I try to accomodate her.

 

I know that really didn't answer your question, but I would look seriously at the child and their interests when it comes to science.

 

Jennie

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I got my oldest into Apologia for general science and just kept her there. It worked because it was self-teaching. We did some experiments but not all (She didn't really like doing them, and I didn't like running around finding things.) She was well-prepared for college-level physics and chemistry after finishing the entire series.

 

My next son did a little sonlight science, a little Real Science 4 kids, a little noeo, and now he's in Apologia as well. We also found a co-op for experiments, so that's good. A friend of mine is doing rainbow science, and I looked at the cost and work involved, and just thought "no, I can't make that happen."

 

My next two are currently doing apologia zoology 3 with co-op. I'm not really thrilled. It's too much reading and not enough hands-on for them. We used noeo in the past, and that was much better.

 

So, basically, I like the idea of doing fun, hands-on science with the little ones, but getting them to the point of being working independently through apologia for high school. I know apologia has its limitations, but its strength is that mom doesn't have to lecture advanced science topics while trying to teach other children.

 

And, yes, I also second guess a whole lot of my homeschooling...

 

Larissa

homeschooling 5 in NJ

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If I had high school to "do over" again with my girls...

 

--We'd spend more time on the Nature of Science, and the actual work of a scientist in the lab, in the field, and in the library.

 

--We'd spend more time on full science projects in just a few areas. I'd probably have them do three per year, from background research and journal citations, to presentation of experimental findings to a local university professor in the field. Or a not-so-local professor...we'd travel to find someone if we had to.

 

--We'd spend more time on the history of science, and the men and women who shaped our understanding of our world.

 

--All the textbook reading would be required, but de-emphasized. Instead of "Read Chapter 3, answer the questions at the end of the chapter, take a chapter test" representing a grade, we'd just use the text for common vocabulary and definitions as we figure out how to answer real science questions.

 

--I'd encourage my students to specialize for a single, long-term, multi-year project. We'd begin a family-learning-project and become experts in a field, on a topic, with a simple area of emphasis. We'd go deeply into one tiny aspect of one field of science, with a laser-bean of focus.

 

--I'd really beef up my middle school science and make sure I covered physical, earth, life and environmental science well so that my students had a great context for these deep and wide high school projects.

 

--I would spend more time at the zoo, at the park, on hikes, and "in the field" on well-designed research trips.

 

--I would emphasize the natural sciences that we can do in our own yard, in our pond, in our garden, in the wildlife populations that visit, in the household environmental impact we represent.

 

Can you tell I am glad I'm a middle school science teacher fulltime now? GRIN. I *never* run out of ideas for the "next thing" my students can study. I have so many summer projects in my gameplan that I only hope I can get them all done. :)

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Am I the only one out there that stresses over these kinds of things?

 

 

Brenda:001_smile:

 

No, you are not the only one to stress over these things. My oldest is in highschool now, and based on what I see in her, I've decided to to have my younger children do a "normal" science curriculum.

 

When my oldest was younger I tried lots of fun and experiment oriented science, but I think my kids just need a typical science format.

 

I do think that I could get away with informal science for the younger ones, and just start hitting it when the kids reach middle school, but I've decided that they are better off starting earlier.

 

Of course, in another 2 years I could change my opinion on this again.;)

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--I'd really beef up my middle school science and make sure I covered physical, earth, life and environmental science well so that my students had a great context for these deep and wide high school projects.

 

Would you be able to expand on this? Ds is in grade 5 and I use WTM methods, as well as suggestions from SWB's Science in the Classical Curriculum CD. Just wondering what else could be beneficial for us. Thanks!

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If you could have a "do over" for your kids in science, what would you do differently.....AND ......What curriculums would you use to prepare your kids for high school science?...

 

Am I the only one out there that stresses over these kinds of things? My husband thinks I'm nuts at times......

 

If you had a do over, what would you do differently??

I do get to do it over again. I have 2 high schoolers and a little man who is just beginning his homeschool journey.:001_smile:

 

I promise you are not the only one who worries about these things, because I do! Of course, it could be that you are hanging out in the right place to find the rest of us nuts.:tongue_smilie:

 

If I had high school to "do over" again with my girls...

 

--We'd spend more time on the Nature of Science, and the actual work of a scientist in the lab, in the field, and in the library.

 

--We'd spend more time on full science projects in just a few areas. I'd probably have them do three per year, from background research and journal citations, to presentation of experimental findings to a local university professor in the field. Or a not-so-local professor...we'd travel to find someone if we had to.

 

--We'd spend more time on the history of science, and the men and women who shaped our understanding of our world.

 

--All the textbook reading would be required, but de-emphasized. Instead of "Read Chapter 3, answer the questions at the end of the chapter, take a chapter test" representing a grade, we'd just use the text for common vocabulary and definitions as we figure out how to answer real science questions.

 

--I'd encourage my students to specialize for a single, long-term, multi-year project. We'd begin a family-learning-project and become experts in a field, on a topic, with a simple area of emphasis. We'd go deeply into one tiny aspect of one field of science, with a laser-bean of focus.

 

--I'd really beef up my middle school science and make sure I covered physical, earth, life and environmental science well so that my students had a great context for these deep and wide high school projects.

 

--I would spend more time at the zoo, at the park, on hikes, and "in the field" on well-designed research trips.

 

--I would emphasize the natural sciences that we can do in our own yard, in our pond, in our garden, in the wildlife populations that visit, in the household environmental impact we represent.

 

Can you tell I am glad I'm a middle school science teacher fulltime now? GRIN. I *never* run out of ideas for the "next thing" my students can study. I have so many summer projects in my gameplan that I only hope I can get them all done. :)

I love this post! Covering physical, earth, life and environmental science well through living books and CM methods is my goal for my little man.

 

Mandy

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Anyone have a good history of the scientists OR do you suggest just books from the library?

 

Beautiful Feet has a History of Science that I will be using with my little guy. Tiner wrote quite a few books- Exploring Planet Earth, Exploring the History of Medicine, Exploring the World of Chemistry, Exploring the World of Mathematics, and Exploring the World of Physics. Each of these gives a lot of history about the topic. Then, of course, there is the Joy Hakim 3 book series- The Story of Science. The Teaching Company also has some history of science lectures.

 

HTH-

Mandy

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What about Joy Hakim's The Story of Science series? Has anyone used these?

 

Brenda

 

Excellent books to read. Books to have around the house in the "choose from these" reading pile. But not "curriculum"--just really good reading. Maybe bedtime reading. :)

 

I'm a fan of working education into the fun times, and not making everything school. (And in that way, making everything school. GRIN!)

 

Lori

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When my kids were small, we chose a science book (I loved the Childcraft books for this), snuggled together and read straight through the book. Then we did a "review" of the concepts by setting days aside for hands-on science. We did the labs in the book and worked on projects. A lot of the science was done in the summer when the plants were growing, the pond was slimy, and the rocks were not under snow. We loved it and it was fun.

 

But we continued to do this too long. If I were to do it over, I'd start the kids in a real textbook in those middle years. This way they would learn to read a science text, take tests, memorize facts, and be ready for the hard textbooks when they get to high school. We tried Bob Jones Biology, but the DVDs were not available that year, and the book was overwhelming. We moved back to Apologia and they have worked well for us--but I think we could have done more if we had started earlier.

 

FWIW,

Jean

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We did the WTM method all along with my first two.....But I think you are right.....At some point during the middle school years, you have to gradually move them to the point of learning vocab and taking tests to prepare them for high school. I think high school was a SHOCK to my first two.....They handled it, but I could have made the transition easier for them.

 

This is what I plan on doing with my "littles". We are going to use the WTM method, k-4th grades.....but then some time in 5th, we start transitioning to more of a text book approach......That is where we are with 2nd ds....moving into 5th grade next July. And he is my little Thomas Edison....Don't want to mess him up in the area of science.

 

And like LoriM said, the text book reading would be required, but de-emphasized. And leave time for projects and history of the scientists.

 

I can not thank all of you ladies enough for this thread. I was moving in this direction anyway, but sometimes it is nice just to have someone confirm what you are doing.

 

Blessings to all of you this Lord's Day,

 

Brenda:001_smile:

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