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If you're a former teacher who now homeschools, what made you decide to leave the school setting for your children?

 

Also, do you find it is sometimes hard to de-school your thinking for your own children, and you worry you are not getting enough done, etc?

 

I ask because I was an 8th grade English teacher prior, and we've decided homeschooling our kids is the best option. I do find myself struggling with worrying that my son is "missing out" or thinking he's not going to know things he "should". I know this is all ludicrous, but I still find myself having to self-talk these ideas out of my head. A veteran homeschooler I met at a local hs curriculum store said teachers are the hardest to "transform" into hsing mothers because of the institutional mindset they are taught. It's amazing how I could handle a class of 30, whereas now, I sometimes doubt myself with just 2! :lol:

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Not here. I was a highschool English teacher, but I only got the degree to bide time until my kids were old enough to hs. I graduated right after 9/11, couldn't find a job, & figured teaching would be secure. I was never cut out for the ps environment, though, as a student or a teacher, & I really. should. have. known. better.

 

So I can't actually answer your question. I was a wrench in the works of the English dept the whole time I was there, lol.

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I first left teaching to be a SAHM. I never thought I would be homeschooling my kids-my dh was opposed, and I wasn't sold on the idea. When my oldest was getting to kindergarten age, my dh had a change of heart and decided that who better to teach our kids than me?!:confused: He was annoyed with the a couple of things that happened with ds's preschool- and it weighed on him. I was hesitant but went to the library and soon became convinced it was the right thing for our family.

 

As far as de schooling goes- no. I was a special education teacher and part of my "gift" in the classroom was to be flexible and creative in bringing the material to my students- so homeschooling has been a good fit.

 

I have been lucky to have experience teaching just about every grade level- in both self-contained and inclusive classrooms, so I feel pretty well equipped overall. I do not feel my kids are missing out- and I don't feel the pulll back to ps. I figure that if I weren't teaching my own I would be back in the classroom teaching othe people's children. I am blessed to be able to teach my own.:D

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I was a special ed teacher too, so I'm used to a variety of approaches and I taught for mastery for all my students. We did try the public schools, but I struggled because I knew as a teacher what SHOULD have been happening in the classroom, but wasn't. I know we are getting more done than they are in our ps system, which is purportedly one of the best in the state. NCLB has killed creativity in the classroom, and instruction is aimed at the middle 30%, which is too low for my kids. Perhaps the local elementary school is just a poor one, but I know my kids have better skills and know far more content to boot.

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As a professional educator in both public and private school settings, I was accustomed to a schedule and to having a designated place to do schoolwork, and that followed me into homeschooling my own children. Some people might see that as a negative thing, but I do not. I think that --for me, at least-- it is vital that I have a plan and not just "fly by the seat of my pants" the way some homeschoolers I've met do. The difference is that I enjoy the freedom of being able to choose *my own* curriculum and set *my own* schedule, etc.

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I taught public and private and was a curriculum director for a private school. I became so frustrated at how much time was wasted in school (private more than public) and how little time kids actually got to think or digest information - I actually told the kids their homework was to go home and think about our book in literarture. But yes, it was very hard for me to transition; it still feels like we do school at home sometimes. I still make centers for my youngest, I hear they are called workboxes in the homeschool world. I also give grades and tests.

 

As far as missing out on what the private school had to offer - NO! Even with a tuition discount and a salary at the private school in regards to money and time; I can provide way more for my kids in terms of arts, sports, etc... The only thing I miss is the school Christmas concert, which was great. I loved being a teacher; I loved the energy in a classroom and helping kids learn a concept. I would get goosebumps when a kid could start to read or construct a really good essay. I still get that with my own children of course but luckily they haven't struggled too much with anything (school wise)so it is not the same.

 

Overall, you will adjust and learn and grow right along with your kids. I love being on this journey and every new turn and opportunity just makes it all so interesting.

 

Best of luck! And know that you are not alone.

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As far as de schooling goes- no. I was a special education teacher and part of my "gift" in the classroom was to be flexible and creative in bringing the material to my students- so homeschooling has been a good fit.

 

I have been lucky to have experience teaching just about every grade level- in both self-contained and inclusive classrooms, so I feel pretty well equipped overall. I do not feel my kids are missing out- and I don't feel the pulll back to ps. I figure that if I weren't teaching my own I would be back in the classroom teaching othe people's children. I am blessed to be able to teach my own.:D

 

This is me too, but I also planned from the "get go" to hs my kids. I am a hs grad, and I went to college as "Plan B", then taught special ed for 3 years before becoming a full time SAHM.

 

Honestly, I have absolutely NO DESIRE ever to teach at school again, though I'm glad I have that degree to fall back upon should it become financially necessary. I'm also glad because it gives me credibility as an educator should anyone (even dh) ever question my hs.

 

I know for a fact my kids get way more at home than they would at ps, though today I did look at my state standards for LA and gasp at the second grade writing requirements. Honestly though I don't believe most second graders are accomplishing that level of writing fluency. I'm glad I have read Charlotte Mason's Companion and have a realistic expectation for ds's progress in that area.

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I was a special ed and regular ed teacher for 10 years before getting married. I decided when I got pregnant that I would home-school. One of the things that was hard for me at first was realizing that there is a lot of stuff that we covered in an informal way that in the school's we had to cover formally. We have not had formal reading lessons since grade 2 or 3 (depending on my child's skill) - in the homeschool environment we could cover vocabulary, context etc. just from our science and history reading. That is true for other things as well. So don't worry too much about him missing out on something. If there is some small thing that he's missed, you usually can catch up by explaining it in 5 minutes!

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Well, I've never actually taught, but I have a BSE music ed - I found out I was expecting ds6 3 days before being offered a job and in a first-time mommie panick I said NO! I am glad I did!!!

 

I will say that my experiences in college (editing papers from other ed majors:001_huh:...) and my experiences student teaching and working in preschools through college led me to SAHM and HS with passion! (to put things diplomatically:tongue_smilie:)

 

Funny - I have no problems molding LA and math to my dc, but music (my forte LOL) can often be another story! I think it's b/c I know the potential sleeping under my roof and it's hard to be content with doing things "slow and steady," being patient to build little-by-little. I hold higher expectations for my own dc which complicates the process.

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I've got a BS in Early and Middle Childhood Ed from Ohio State--

 

I graduated w/o doing student teaching, and told them I never wanted to teach, ever, so they'd let me graduate with just a degree and not a certificate. I took a year off of teaching (working as a law office receptionist) and then taught preschool and K for several years. After kids, I went back to preschool, threw in some elementary half-day stuff, and watched a child in my home. I tutored adults who needed help in reading, too.

 

I never truly considered homeschooling until dd came along, then homeschooled two of my three kiddos, starting one in K and the other in 9th grade in the same first year--quite a span.

 

I read all I could about homeschooling and I'll tell ya, my eyes have been opened to more possibilities than I ever thought were out there. I know there are gaps that my eldest will just have to fill during a lifetime of learning, and I know I did really, really well as my children's teacher in some areas. I had to go back to work this year and put dd8 into school for the first time--3rd grade (she actually went to preschool, but that's diff). I don't ever want to work as a preschool teacher again, I hated the elementary "pressure" and homework/assignments/projects/peer group/etc., and I hope we can homeschool from here on out.

 

Now, what was your question? :lol:

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I taught middle school lang arts before I married and (9mos later) became a SAHM. When my 1st approached school age, I knew I didn't want to send her to ps. We chose to place her in the school at our church. My two oldest continued with that set of tchrs (long story) for 9 yrs. It was as close to homeschooling as you can get without homeschooling--dd was in a class of 5 middle schoolers and ds was in a class of 10 K-5th graders.

 

I began homeschooling mainly because of the cost. By the time we moved back to Indy, I really enjoyed teaching my own kids and knew we'd continue homeschooling.

 

I don't worry about not doing enough or being good enough or.... I think I'm accomplishing so much more than I did in the classroom with 25 kids. And, I really, really like being with my kids. So far, we've been successful in the high school years. DD is graduating college this year, with honors. DS graduates high school and has been accepted to a great pharmacy program. DS2 is tooling through 2nd grade and I'm excited about seeing him through his educational journey.

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I taught high school math before we had kids. Then I stayed home for the first years. I never planned on homeschooling, but I started teaching them when they were in preschool and I liked it so much we just continued on.

 

I don't know if you ever get over worrying that they are "missing" out on something even if you have never taught in a public school. You will spend a lot of time thinking about how to fill holes, avoid gaps, and just make sure they are getting the best education possible. That is just part of homeschooling. I will say that reading WTM was a huge comfort to me in the beginning just making sure I wasn't missing something, and it is still (7 years into this gig) the basic guide I use in my planning.

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My spouse is a former full-time PS teacher. We chose to HS because what we saw in public education was unacceptable both socially and academicly.

 

During our schooling discussions, it frequently comes up that she needs to adjust her ideas since she isn't teaching a class of >20 kids. She also frequently compares to what other children the same age are learning.

 

When speaking to fellow PS teachers concerning HSing, my wife has met a range of reactions from open hostility to congratulations.

 

We know many former teachers that are now homeschooling.

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I taught jr. high in a Christian school for 11 years before we adopted our kids. It's because I was a teacher that I decided to homeschool. I know that in a classroom setting, even with the smaller class size of a Christian school, I could really only teach to the "middle" kids. The bright ones didn't get challenged like they should have and the "lower" ones, I couldn't always give the individual attention to. I like the idea that my first grade age child could possibly be reading at a 3rd grade level and doing kindergarten math and that would be ok. I could challenge and remediate my child, as needed. I also saw the garbage that goes on at the jr. high level, even in Christian schools. That being said, if we could afford it, I would consider putting my kids in Christian schools, even now. The plan is to homeschool through 8th grade and then put them in Christian highschool. That may change, though. My biggest problem is, I can't stand teaching my kids to read. I'm used to kids coming to me knowing that stuff. I love jr. high age kids, and it's been the hardest thing teaching the basic skills.

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I have a M. Ed. in English Education (taught high school English in a private Christian high school and one year in public school) and am homeschooling 2 kindergarteners (and a 3yo who is fully persuaded he is in K-5 too, LOL).

 

I'm sure I do things more "structured" than many, but - that's also my personality. I am comfortable with some of the "trappings" of a school-ish mentality, but finding a pretty good groove with the flexibility of hs'ing too (I know that K-5 is often not considered "real" HS'ing).

 

One of our primary reasons for hs'ing is the freedom of educational style afforded only by home schooling (we have identical twins and this is critical for us).

 

The truth is that in a classroom setting, the teaching is indeed taught to the middle - the bright ones are bored (not being given the opportunity to reach full potential) and the ones who need more careful one-on-one guidance don't receive it (also not being given the opportunity to reach full potential).

 

*Of course there are other reasons we home school, but educational "concerns" certainly make hs'ing the BEST choice for US.

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I am another professional teacher raising my hand.

 

I have a master's degree in elementary education, and I taught 4 years in a Catholic grammar school before having my children. I taught language arts and social studies to the sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students.

 

We started homeschooling because I could not find an educational environment that suited our needs and our budget.

 

Jennie

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Thank you to everyone who "raised their hands"! It's so nice to hear from other former teachers as to why you chose this route and how it's going for you.

 

Like many of you, after seeing what I saw in the ps (esp. w/ middle schoolers), I knew that was NOT what I wanted for my kids (esp. from a social standpoint). I never thought I'd go down this road, but like someone else said, it was the best educational choice we could find, and I'm glad I've chosen it. Some days are easier than others, of course, but it's nice to be able to guide my son educationally while still "sheltering" him socially from the harshness in schools. It's also fun to choose my curriculum vs. having one forced on me that I don't even agree with or that I know wouldn't work for the majority of my students. At this point, I don't think I could go back to the classroom (unless I had to financially) because I'm not that person anymore. I don't agree with our conveyor belt system anymore even though it's the norm... stepping from the norm, I think, has been the hardest part, even if I don't agree with it, KWIM? I think that is why I still make the comparisons even though I KNOW my kids are getting a better education being home with me.

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I did a stint in teaching HS English, switching careers from advertising. I did my student teaching when 9/11 happened, then had DD1 in 2003. DH has been teaching HS English for 17 years at one of the better HS's in the Chicago system. After spending enough time in the teacher meetings and just day-to-day in the department office (attn: parents! if you disagree with them, they dismiss you a MORON and mock you), we opted to not hand our kids over to the system. Some of it was for academic reasons. Some of it was due to too many teachers being more interested in "re-education" than in education.

 

There is one CPS school we're watching should we ever find ourselves in over our heads. It's the Chicago Virtual Charter School, which does not use CPS curriculum. It uses K12.com curriculum instead, which seems to be much more solid.

 

I don't worry too much about the DD's missing much. We cart around town to all sorts of activities. I joke that DD1 knows every 5yo on the northside of Chicago as a result.

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I only got the degree to bide time until my kids were old enough to hs.

 

I was never cut out for the ps environment, though, as a student or a teacher, & I really. should. have. known. better.

 

I am with you on this. I started college right out of high school and had no idea what I wanted to do. I liked a little of everything and the things I love to do and am good at are "technical" and my parents wouldn't have that. My husband (then fiancee) had our first son when I was a senior in high school and he was a few months old when I started. I wanted to do it for him as well. Then I went for teaching because it was "fun" and knew I could get good grades, etc. I then chose to go into special education teaching after my first sped class. When my son was 2 they diagnosed him as having receptive/expressive language disorder caused by his coming into this world not breathing. They wanted speech therapy and everything else but since I had training in sped I pulled him after the first day and finished up with it at home. After 6 months he had caught up 18 months of speech (and is a perfect talker now), that's when I knew I loved helping my child learn.

I never graduated as I had health problems and had to drop the semester before my student teaching so I lack one semester. Anyways, I think it is giving me an advantage, it also helped me see the bad in the ps systems around here which really are horrible. I could write 100s of pages on the inside and corruptive dirt of these schools in this system. Anyways, I think it's giving me an edge to an extent. I have the teaching education but not the experience so it works!

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I think one of the best benefits of having been a teacher is that no one questions my ability to homeschool. It is one less argument to have about whether or not homeschooling should be legal, what about socialization, etc...

 

I have an engineering degree, but I got my alternative certification. Taught a year of middle-school math at a public school and 3 years of elementary science at a private school.

 

People find out that I'm a "teacher" and they nod their heads and completely accept that I'm a homeschooler.

 

Nevermind that I've had a grand total of 3 education courses. I learned how to do my portfolio and how to use technology in the classroom. But, nothing on teaching reading. Or math. Or...much of anything helpful to me. But, I don't tell them that. :D

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forgot this part.

 

I worked part-time when my oldest was born. The next year, the hours would have been longer and I was having trouble finding reasonable, dependable, part-time childcare.

 

NOW..... I don't think I could go back. I prefer one-on-one (or one-on-two) teaching and I'm spoiled.

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People find out that I'm a "teacher" and they nod their heads and completely accept that I'm a homeschooler.

 

 

 

I've had the same experience. It is convenient but it also ticks me off a bit since I know so many homeschooling moms who do not have a teaching degree.

 

On the flip side - my mom told me that it was a shame that I was using my teaching skills to only teach 2 children.

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  • 1 month later...

I taught high school English, ESL, and History before becoming a high school counselor. I worked for a little over 16 years in public education.

 

A few different things led me to homeschooling. My husband was the first to say that he didn't want our kids in the local public school and really didn't like me getting home so late and having them in after school care at such a young age. He also expressed that he HATED school and would love to have had the option to homeschool.

 

I had NO intention of hsing, but through a long series of events, (my husband got asked to take a job in another state for one) I decided to give it a try.

 

Honestly, I miss working! I loved what I did. I hope to go back some day. But for now, this is working out for us and I just can't see putting them in school for a good long while, if at all.

 

Dawn

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If you're a former teacher who now homeschools, what made you decide to leave the school setting for your children?

 

When people ask me this question I tell them that I was homeschooled, went to two private schools, and taught in four public schools. And then I picked what I thought was the best option of the three. :D

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I left to stay home with my kids because I wanted to be with MY own kids. When I was teaching I was spending the day with other peoples kids while other people spent the day with mine. It did not make sense to me. I do stress out about missing stuff, but I will never regret spending time teaching my own kids.

Sheri

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I was a speech language pathologist before staying home to raise my 1st son.

 

I worked for 3 years in ps. Since I was rarely in a classroom setting and in more of a tutoring situation, homeschooling is a perfect fit for me. I never enjoyed it when I did collaborative work in the classroom with the teacher, and liked individual therapy sessions best. Funny, though, because I did once want to teach and my dad told me, "Nah, you don't want to teach. Teachers get no respect and they get paid so little." :lol: Uh, my paycheck now is zippo, dad!

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I taught high-school English for nine years at a magnet school in our district. I loved my job! When I became pregnant, both dh & I were agreed that I would be a SAHM, and I quit my job. The first year was such an adjustment for me because I would feel grateful for the opportunity to stay at home but felt guilty because I missed my job.

 

I worked through those feelings and then felt the pull to homeschool. God brought to my attention Deuteronomy 6:6-7 and then brought a friend from high school, who now homeschools her children, back into my life. After asking her about homeschooling, and her sharing her copy of WTM with me, I was hooked!

 

My daughter attended two years of preschool (3K & 4K), and when one of the teachers there (who had just earned her certification and was going to be teaching ps the next year) heard that I was going to be homeschooling the next year, she told me that she thought that I would be wasting my talent because I was such a good teacher!:001_huh: I was so stunned that I didn't even reply, but I have thought of a lot of good retorts since then!

 

There are sometimes when my educatorese crops up, and another former teacher in my homeschool co-op group and I myself commiserate over the expectations from ps that we still hold on to. For example, we were required to submit a syllabus for our co-op classes, and ours turned out to be way more detailed than the co-op board wanted.

 

I don't really find myself questioning what my children are missing; I'm just grateful to be able to share this experience of learning with them.

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Here, too. I majored in Elementary Education with a reading specialty. I taught before moving, then taught in preschool for a bit. I loved it, but had no idea how great it would be to stay home with my own and teach them for myself. The thought never occurred to me until my oldest spent two months in ps K. We pulled her out at Thanksgiving and she has just finished 2nd grade at home. I tell all of my teacher friends that I'm spoiled for the classroom now; I love teaching one -on - one and with such great flexibility! Classroom teachers are severely limited in what they can do by so many factors that just don't exist at home.

 

I also think it's sad that people assume I'm better qualified for homeschooling since that was my major in college; I tell them all that really did was help me to understand what was happening in the classroom better and that it wasn't for us. After two months in the classroom my oldest was invisible in the class - her teacher didn't even remember her name at our parent teacher conference nor could she answer any specific questions about her as a student. Her teacher had 21 K in her 1/2 day class, plus another 24 in her morning 1/2 day class. She had to pay attention to the trouble makers in order to maintain control. You know what my daughter learned in K? She learned how to put her head on the table until everyone was quiet and the teacher could turn the lights back on. Not a life skill, I have to say.

 

Anyway, I am so happy to be able to homeschool and watch them learn and grow at their own paces and to do it on our family's schedule - if they were on a regular school schedule they would never see their daddy during the week. Now they get to have breakfast with him practically every morning!

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I am another professional teacher raising my hand.

 

I have a master's degree in elementary education, and I taught 4 years in a Catholic grammar school before having my children. I taught language arts and social studies to the sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students.

 

We started homeschooling because I could not find an educational environment that suited our needs and our budget.

 

Jennie

 

This is basically us as well. I have an elementary education degree and a master's in special education. I taught for 7 years in a Catholic elementary school: 3 years teaching computer to PK-8th, 3 years teaching 6th, 7th, and 8th math, then the last year I taught middle school math, 6th language arts, 8th algebra 1-all part time and finished my master's. I was told by my doctor to quit when I was 8 months pregnant. I never went back and God willing, never will.

 

But the public schools here are terrible and the private/Catholic/Christian schools are way out of our price range. And I know that as active as both of my children are, the teachers would be looking to medicate them. :glare: We're committed to hs'ing through 8th grade and we're open to discussion for high school. Since dd is only 5, we have time. :tongue_smilie:

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I have mostly taught special education, so I am used to individualizing, modifying, adapting and being flexible.

 

I'm still teaching one day a week for the benefits. In Canada, teachers pay is pretty good and the benefits are good. (ie dental coverage, and extended medical coverage for things that are not covered by medical)

 

My children are part of a home learning program in which they get up to 2 days of optional classes. There are quite a few of these in our province and people get money to spend on classes, curriculum (which for most home learners is the only incentive to sign up)

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I didn't mention it in my previous post, but I was also a Special Ed teacher (middle and high school). That makes eight of us in this thread that were Sp Ed teachers. I wonder why that is?

 

I know one of the main reasons I homeschool is that year after year I taught the kids who had fallen through the cracks and had been failed by our public school system. I want more for my kids.

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I was a public school elementary teacher when I left in the middle of my first pregnancy to be a SAHM. I taught in CA and was required to be a member of the teachers' union. I was disgusted by what I saw, and it only got worse the longer I stayed out of the public school mindset. Looking back, I realize I was witnessing the implemetation of a system interested in indoctrination and not education. The ones who tried to be teachers were frustrated at what they were doing or just left.

 

I had not problem adjusting my mindset to start homeschooling. I was terrified to homeschool, but would willingly teach 33 kindergartners! When I look at what I witnessed 12 years ago, I realize how much better it is for my girls here and how many more opportunities they have.

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I wonder if there are more Sp Ed teachers becasue we've seen how effective one-on-one tutoring is and want that for our children? I found that I'm very good with very small groups of children, but NOT with an entire classroom.

 

I don't know. When I was teaching, I mostly taught 25-35 middle school kids. I didn't really have a problem, but I was better with the ones that had been "labeled." I also ran a High Achievers class. Being a Catholic school, we couldn't call it Gifted because then we would have to take federal money. I also did tutoring on the side. Part of me preferred the larger group, but I always got much more accomplished in my smaller groups. So it could be that we see the benefits and want that for our kids rather than feeding at the trough of school!

 

I got my Master's in Special Education because I wanted to be a diagnostician and it's an add-on certification here. Instead of finishing, I had two kids!! :)

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I taught elementary for 4 years:

year 1: 5th & 6th grade classroom for migrant workers kids. LOVED it!

year 2: 1st & 2nd grades at a Christian Navajo Mission School in New Mexico (I can still say hi, point with my lips, and sing Jesus Loves Me in Navajo! :D)

year 3: same as above

year 4: Moved closer to my fiance'. Taught grades 5-8 in a small Christian school (I had 18 students), and was the Principal. No aid, no secretary, just me! I also planned my wedding, and got married in March of that year!

 

After that year my dh was transferred to Washington, and I decided to work part-time, and work on making a family! :D I worked part-time until my 2nd son was born, then became a SAHM. I was actually going to go back to part-time work once the kids were all in school. Never heard of or considered homeschooling! But God led us to homeschool, in a very obvious way, so here we are, still going strong 11 years later! Our oldest was in 2nd when we started homeschooling. I have no plans to go back into teaching at a school once our homeschooling years are over.

 

I did have a bit of a time adjusting. Teachers are taught classroom techniques, not one-on-one! Much of what I learned in college had nothing to do with helping me in a homeschooling situation! It was like starting from scratch, and for the first couple of years I was concerned whether I was doing enough. But as we went along, I realized that the person who loved them most in the world and wanted the very best for them, and would do most anything to see them succeed, was teaching them---me! If I kept encouraging them to make progress, and worked with them to the best of my ability, they would succeed! That doesn't mean they'll neccessarily take top honors or be Rhodes Scholars, but they WILL be well-loved, respected, intelligent, good adult citizens! That settled it for me!

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I taught public school for 8 years -- grades K, 2, 3/4. I still tutor in a public school and have done some summer school sessions, too.

 

I left when my first son was born, planning to come back and job-share. Instead, I wound up making a nice hourly wage tutoring. The students I tutored were homeschoolers. I liked what I saw in the homeschool setting, and gradually decided that was what I wanted for my kids.

 

What appeals to me most about the homeschool setting is the flexibility. I don't need to schedule a meeting with 10 different people to change the learning plan for my boys. I just do it. Addressing individual needs in a traditional classroom is like turning the Titanic. Here at home, it's more like turning a bike.

 

I do not struggle with the sense of 'not doing enough.' I do more at home than I did in my classroom... and what I do, I do better. Everything is easier with just 2 kids.

 

It may help that I still work at a school and am frequently reminded just how much work it is to teach well with a big class of kids.

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I taught jr. high science for 11 years before we adopted the boys, at which time I decided to be a sahm. One of the reasons I'm homeschooling is because I taught and I know what goes on in schools - and I taught in a good Christian school, too. It's been a hard transition, though. Jr. highers came to me knowing how to read - and this teaching my boys how to read is about sending me over the edge. I'd rather teach content than skills any day!

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we've seen how effective one-on-one tutoring is and want that for our children

:iagree:

I wasn't a Special Ed. teacher, but I've seen the effectiveness of one-on-one tutoring. At our magnet school (high-school), our hour-long lunch was divided into two sections. The second section was reserved for club meetings or tutoring (which was required if students dropped below a C and trumped club meetings). In these tutoring sessions, I was amazed at how much (and how quickly!) students could improve in a one-on-one or small-group situation. That personal interaction, where you learn to see where the student is coming from and strengths and weaknesses in thinking patterns, makes all the difference.

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This is my first year HSing and I have felt much the same way that you do, Jennifer. I find myself feeling like there are so many things I want to do that it makes it difficult for me to commit to one curriculum, as well. I do know that my kids are getting more than they would in a "regular" school but I still have those feelings now and again. Good luck!

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Where did you teach? I worked in LAUSD for 16.5 years.

 

Dawn

 

I was a public school elementary teacher when I left in the middle of my first pregnancy to be a SAHM. I taught in CA and was required to be a member of the teachers' union. I was disgusted by what I saw, and it only got worse the longer I stayed out of the public school mindset. Looking back, I realize I was witnessing the implemetation of a system interested in indoctrination and not education. The ones who tried to be teachers were frustrated at what they were doing or just left.

 

I had not problem adjusting my mindset to start homeschooling. I was terrified to homeschool, but would willingly teach 33 kindergartners! When I look at what I witnessed 12 years ago, I realize how much better it is for my girls here and how many more opportunities they have.

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If you're a former teacher who now homeschools, what made you decide to leave the school setting for your children?

 

Also, do you find it is sometimes hard to de-school your thinking for your own children, and you worry you are not getting enough done, etc?

 

I ask because I was an 8th grade English teacher prior, and we've decided homeschooling our kids is the best option. I do find myself struggling with worrying that my son is "missing out" or thinking he's not going to know things he "should". I know this is all ludicrous, but I still find myself having to self-talk these ideas out of my head. A veteran homeschooler I met at a local hs curriculum store said teachers are the hardest to "transform" into hsing mothers because of the institutional mindset they are taught. It's amazing how I could handle a class of 30, whereas now, I sometimes doubt myself with just 2! :lol:

I don't know if this counts or not but the private school that my oldest son works in and has worked in for 20 yrs started with two of my older dc and a couple of other children that were having difficulty in ps. We quickly grew from the 4 students to 21 students that year in my living room! It was then moved up the the church and I was one of the main teachers for another 1 1/2 yrs.

When my son had the car accident that sort of took us both out as he was unable to work for over a year and I pretty much lived at the hospital and then cared for him at home. He went back but I didn't.

Having our two older dc in this school was not that great of an experience. I knew in my heart when we started foster care that if we would every be blessed with children that would be ours forever I would home school them.

When we got Mr T and Missy M at 6 and 18 months I felt in my heart that they would be ours and I knew that I would home school them.

I have spent plenty of time looking back with awe as to what God has done but never with any regret.

I used to worry that they were being cheated by having older parents that don't have the energy and life style that most of you younger folk have but God has shown me so much even there that I don't have that any more.

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I taught jr. high science for 11 years before we adopted the boys, at which time I decided to be a sahm. One of the reasons I'm homeschooling is because I taught and I know what goes on in schools - and I taught in a good Christian school, too. It's been a hard transition, though. Jr. highers came to me knowing how to read - and this teaching my boys how to read is about sending me over the edge. I'd rather teach content than skills any day!

:iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree:

 

I taught math. How on EARTH do those early years teachers do it???!!!! Give me my middle school kids anyday! And my daughter taught herself to read, so I'm dreading that with my son!!!!

Edited by rowan25
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Yeah, right there with you. Teaching young kids to read is painful for me.

 

Dawn

 

I taught jr. high science for 11 years before we adopted the boys, at which time I decided to be a sahm. One of the reasons I'm homeschooling is because I taught and I know what goes on in schools - and I taught in a good Christian school, too. It's been a hard transition, though. Jr. highers came to me knowing how to read - and this teaching my boys how to read is about sending me over the edge. I'd rather teach content than skills any day!
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So good to meet all of you with one more thing in common!

 

For me one of the biggest "deschooling" issues continues to be finishing all of a day's work really quickly. I have to continually tell myself that most of my day in a classroom was spent getting kids to line up, get out books, wait for quiet, wait for answers or try to get more than one kid to answer a question... when it is just one, she can do it at her pace, set her own break times, and get it all done in 3 hours or less. If she has done a lesson or two in the subjects I have assigned, I need to let it go and not think that just because it is not yet 3 p.m., she should be "working" more.

 

I love being able to individualize to her level and interests. I love being able to include lessons that there was never time for in the classroom - I remember planning art and music lessons, week after week, that I never got to as I waited for all 30 kids to finish their science or whatever.

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I taught preschool and kindergarten before becoming a SAHM and homeschooler.

 

While I loved my job, I can definitely say that it influenced my decision to homeschool.

I felt horrible for the kids who were traumatized by separation anxiety, and I had to be the one to 'hold them back' as their moms walked (sometimes crying themselves) out the door.

I though "how pointless"...especially at that young age. It completely made me realize Little kids NEED their parents!

 

Other things that made me want to stay home - seeing a child's face light up for the first time when the 'get' a new concept, or doing all sorts of fun projects with the kids.

All I could think is ..."Thier parents are missing out on SO much! They don't get to watch them learn." :-(

 

I knew I wanted to be there for my kids.

 

Other things that influenced me - I wanted my kids to be able to openly talk about their faith.

I hated that we couldn't celebrate Christian holidays when I was teaching. (Only 'winter' and 'spring'. It was offensive to discuss my own faith, yet I HAD to teach about every other 'multicultural' holiday....it was very hypocritical.)

 

As far as things that carry over - I'm very uptight about how my books are organized, and I have a definite idea of how I would like to arrange our 'classoom' if we ever had the space/money...but for the most part I have embraced the more relaxed routines of homeschooling.

 

If I could just have one thing that our PS had...a janitor... oh how I would love someone to clean up for us!

Edited by mom2jjka
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I taught Jr High and High School mathematics. I chose the town where we live based upon the school district. We have high taxes so that we may have low student to teacher ratios, pay teachers a high wage, and buy the lastest and greatest educational material.:lol: This cracks me up since I never got to work in the district and my children are homeschooled.:001_huh:

 

The decision to homeschool was a difficult one for us to make. First, my professor at Fairly Ridiculous University describe homeschoolers as right wing Christian extreemist.:eek: I had never met a homeschooler, so I didn't know better. Second, I taught jr high and high school mathematics! How was I going to teach everything else to elementary age girls? I was in a panic, but I found a local homeschool group who helped me quite a bit. One women spoke with me for hours and hours.

 

We pulled both of my girls out of public school due to a very long list of issues. The main issue was the bullying of both of my girls. My eldest was bullied by her teacher as well as by other students in 1st grade. Boys were calling her stupid in math. The teacher was pulling books out of her hands saying they were too hard for her to read.:glare: She would read the books to me in the store and I would purchase them for her.:001_huh: They took a little girl how had a love for learning and crashed her spirit. I found myself teaching her at home more and more. We could not afford private school, so here we are.

 

I am so very greatful for those hard times. It lead me here.:001_smile: I love the time I spend teaching my girls.

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