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Notebooking...Convince Me


Saille
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I keep looking at various bloggers' kids' colorful notebooking pages, and the bulletin board making ex-teacher in me finds them appealing...here's my problem:

 

In handwriting, my kids move from Getty-Dubay Italics to a copybook full of famous quotes and religious instruction made using Getty-Dubay software (I keep abbreviating Getty-Dubay and then worrying that someone will misunderstand me :001_huh:). As I understand it, my goal for the future should be moving to a student-kept copybook, in which they write down compelling passages or famous quotes they read.

 

Are those of you who use printable/packaged notebooking pages using them in this fashion? Are they a stepping stone to entirely student-done journaling, including hand-drawn maps and so on, or are they an end in and of themselves? If they are a stepping stone, is there a particular set of notebooking pages for History that you feel moves a child in the direction of self-generated content? I'm planning to use Noeo Chemistry next year, and I think they include notebooking pages, and Trail Guide to World Geography sells them now as well, so really it's the History I'm wondering about.

 

Also, if you lapbook, do you do it also? Instead? Is it open-ended, or designed to elicit very specific content?

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For History I use the SoTW activity guides. I take the book to a copy place and have them rip off the binding. The student pages go into a binder with tabbed dividers for each chapter. (yep. all 42 of them!) The rest of the book I have spiral bound for me.

 

Then, as we cover each chapter we complete the activity pages (usually a map and a colouring page) and add in any notes from other books we've read, our narrations from SoTW and the chapter test.

 

That's sufficient, I think, for elementary. We did do one lapbook, but it was horrifically time consuming and I'm not sure the kids got much out of it.

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I have 2 boys and I was very surprised at how much they like notebooking/ lapbooking. We do notebooking with Winter Promise... but lapbooking is more fun for us.

 

Lapbooking is writing information on mini-books, folding paper in a variety of ways and shapes, and producing your own booklets. We often paste our booklets onto colored cardstock, hole-punch them and place them in folders that have the 3 bendable metal clips so they make their own books. Other lapbookers paste the booklets onto file folders. All this with the premise that the more they manipulate information, the more they remember it...

 

Here are some websites that are helpful to us:

http://www.homeschoolshare.com/Lapbooks_at_HSS.php

 

http://www.homeschoolhelperonline.com/lapbooks.htm

 

HTH

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If they are a stepping stone, is there a particular set of notebooking pages for History that you feel moves a child in the direction of self-generated content?

 

History Scribe provides a topic heading, ie, The Barbarian Invasion, a space for a drawing, and lines for original composition (or dictation or copywork, whatever you or the kids want).

 

Also, if you lapbook, do you do it also? Instead? Is it open-ended, or designed to elicit very specific content?

 

It can be either. Minibooks vary so widely that you could hand a child a completely blank one, give them one with a general heading, or make it totally specific. I have a book by the Tobin's Lab lady -- what's her name? -- that explains how to make a plan for matching your information to minibooks, or choosing minibooks for your lapbook. Someday I'll hand it over to my kid, probably when we start doing projects for presentation, like science fairs.

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Last year, we did pages that had lines on the bottom and a blank space on the top. Each week they would choose something to write about (a few sentences) from history and draw a picture. DS absolutely loved it. DD didn't like drawing the pictures, so I changed to Notebooking Nook pages for her. Writing assignments and copywork were separate.

 

This year, we are combining some of our notebook pages with our writing assignments. They do digital scrapbooking and make a notebook page. You can look at my blog if you're interested in seeing some examples.

 

There are many ways to do notebooking. Do what works for you.

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