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Guest princessp
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Guest princessp

Ok, so from my question yesterday it looks like the majority uses a curriculum. My son will be first grade this fall. How do I begin to look around for one? I know a lot of it will depend on what appeals to be but do most of you find a single curriculum that covers all the subjects better? Or do you use one for each subject? I bet one for each subject begins to get expensive, yes? Help me out, talk to me like I'm two. Where do I even begin? I was thinking of starting by researching the suggested programs in the WTM book and figured in researching those I'd find others to look at also. I'm just worried I'm going end up w/ ds falling behind from the begginning. :confused:

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First of all relax. Your son won't fall behind if it takes you a few months to figure out what you're doing. :)

 

I'm assuming that you've read the WTM since you mentioned it in your post. I think it's a great idea to look at what WTM recommends and then widen your search if you don't like their rec's. It's important to know why you want what you do. Are you looking for strong academics, or lots of crafts or....? If you narrow down what exactly what style you are looking for then it limits your choices.

 

The recommendations that are in WTM are a terrific place to start. If you get those and then use them, you'll know what you like and don't like. If you decide to get something different then that's fine. Some people like to research curriculum and figure things out. Others like to order what seems reasonable without lots of angst and comparing between all possible options. Each way is fine, so long as it works for you.

 

I personally like to research curriculum and different homeschool philosophies. This gets me into trouble though, as I get distracted from my goals.;)

 

I tend to look for a curriculum for each subject since my kids have never fit the grade level across subjects. A history program looked good but it had too much writing. This complete curriculum was out since the reading level was too easy for my dd. etc. etc. etc.

 

One thing I would recommend that SWB says is once you have a curriculum that's working don't switch it unless there's a problem. There is so much curriculum out there that you'll drive yourself a bit batty if you're constantly looking for the "perfect" one. It just doesn't exist.

 

Happy Hunting.:D

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I went with a box curriculum for our 1st few year of homeschooling. It was a good place to start, I think. It gave me a good idea of what we like and what we don't, and I wasn't too overwhelmed as a newbie. However, now I love researching curriculum! I love finding things to match my kids' needs.

 

Don't worry about getting everything 'perfect' for this 1st year!! Cover the basics with phonics/reading, writing, math with something. These are the most important things in 1st grade. The others you will figure out in time :) Enjoy your time together. Be flexible. Be patient with yourself and your dc!

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I am in the same boat as you in that I will be starting to homeschool my son for first grade this fall (so I don't have any been there, done that advice). I am going with a different curriculum, loosely based on suggestions from WTM, for each subject. My son is very hands-on (ADHD, among other issues), so I'm trying to tailor things to him from that. If you haven't read Cathy Duffy's book "100 Top Picks of Homeschool Curriculum," I highly recommend it. It really helped me see that my style is not my son's style and really helped me narrow down the choices. I had been thinking of doing Saxon for math... until I read that. It would have worked perfectly for ME, but for him... torture. We're planning on using Math-U-See now. It probably could get expensive but there are lots of things for sale on craigslist, on this forum, etc. I found a used bookstore here in town, too, that has a lot of reference books I can purchase for cheap. I wound up with a copy of the red Kingfisher history book for $12 the other week, for example. Another friend is going to give me her MUS Alpha when she's done with it here this spring, and all I'll have to purchase is some base 10 blocks if we wind up needing them. I may just use Legos. I'm worried about falling behind, too, even though I've already got some idea of what I want to accomplish. I think until I get some actual experience under my belt, that worry is going to be there. I'm glad I'm not the only one!

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Ok, so from my question yesterday it looks like the majority uses a curriculum. My son will be first grade this fall. How do I begin to look around for one? I know a lot of it will depend on what appeals to be but do most of you find a single curriculum that covers all the subjects better? Or do you use one for each subject? I bet one for each subject begins to get expensive, yes? Help me out, talk to me like I'm two. Where do I even begin? I was thinking of starting by researching the suggested programs in the WTM book and figured in researching those I'd find others to look at also. I'm just worried I'm going end up w/ ds falling behind from the begginning. :confused:

 

"Curriculum" does not mean "that stack of books there." It means "the subjects offered by an institution of education."

 

IOW, you decide what you want to teach; that's your curriculum. So even if you haven't bought anything yet because you don't know what you want, you DO have "curriculum."

 

Then you decide what you want to use to teach.

 

I have never found a single publisher I like for everything.

 

I like Spalding (Writing Road to Reading is the manual) for some English-related things (spelling, reading, handwriting); Rod and Staff Publishers for arithmetic/math; KONOS for history/science.

 

I also like Beautiful Feet Books (history), Considering God's Creation (science), Easy Grammar (grammar), and Writing Strands (composition).

 

But starting out with a little one, I'd probably only go for Spalding and Beginning Arithmetic (R&S), and fiddle around with the other stuff for awhile.

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I have two boys who will be six in April and first graders in the fall.

 

I'm certainly no expert, but after some research, here's what I plan to do:

 

1) Sing, Spell, Read and Write ~ for phonics, reading, spelling etc. etc. It looks fun, has CD's, games, VERY comprehensive. Don't know if it will work, but I bit.

 

2) Right Start Math ~ friends rave about it.

 

3) Galloping Around the Globe ~ everyone seems to love it.

 

4) Definitely read the Little House series to him -- my boys absolutely lived for it and learned so much about so much.

 

5) We're in a postcard exchange group and when we receive a postcard, we circle it on our map and put the child's/families name.

 

6) I use fun curriculum books I find in Costco.

 

7) I find two articles in the paper for them each day that I think will grab their interest. I read it to them, have them cut it out, tape it on white paper, write their name and then show it to Dad for more discussion later. It's usually science related.

 

8) When I was teaching them money, I "made" them pay me for their food. They had a menu with prices and had to find the right dime, penny, or quarter combo. It was fun.

 

9) I let them watch the Magic School Bus series which I order from the library.

 

There, I've probably totally overwhelmed you. Where are you located?

 

Alicia

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I have two boys who will be six in April and first graders in the fall.

 

I'm certainly no expert, but after some research, here's what I plan to do:

 

1) Sing, Spell, Read and Write ~ for phonics, reading, spelling etc. etc. It looks fun, has CD's, games, VERY comprehensive. Don't know if it will work, but I bit.

 

2) Right Start Math ~ friends rave about it.

 

3) Galloping Around the Globe ~ everyone seems to love it.

 

4) Definitely read the Little House series to him -- my boys absolutely lived for it and learned so much about so much.

 

5) We're in a postcard exchange group and when we receive a postcard, we circle it on our map and put the child's/families name.

 

6) I use fun curriculum books I find in Costco.

 

7) I find two articles in the paper for them each day that I think will grab their interest. I read it to them, have them cut it out, tape it on white paper, write their name and then show it to Dad for more discussion later. It's usually science related.

 

8) When I was teaching them money, I "made" them pay me for their food. They had a menu with prices and had to find the right dime, penny, or quarter combo. It was fun.

 

9) I let them watch the Magic School Bus series which I order from the library.

 

There, I've probably totally overwhelmed you. Where are you located?

 

Alicia

 

 

OH, what great ideas you have!!

 

I've been at this for 5 yrs. and I started with Sonlight and became quite comfortable after the first year to just pick and choose what I liked for each subject after that.

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