Jump to content

Menu

What to use with 5th grader who has a hard time with handwriting?


dorothy
 Share

Recommended Posts

DD has done all of the Getty-Dubay books and still have messy handwriting. It tires her to write if she does so slowly and carefully. She is right that if she writes as slowly as she has to in order to be neat, she would take much longer to complete her work. I think she needs a very simple, clean, straightforward cursive to help her.

 

What do you think? What do you recommend?

 

Many thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peterson Handwriting theory

http://www.peterson-handwriting.com/index.htm

http://www.peterson-handwriting.com/HomeSchoolKits.html

 

An innovative method for teaching handwriting. Relies on teaching rhythm of movement and fluency. The website has a lot of information on early literacy and writing skills, as well as a CD Rom called Animated Letters, where the letters write themselves, in the rhythm, on the screen for the child to learn to follow along.

The Peterson method has been around since 1908, but the research and development is ongoing.

--

I like the idea behind the Petersons approach, where they learn the letters as a series of motions, rather than just as the finished visualization of the letter. I think that might really help him to learn to write each letter automatically, and eventually not have to labor over the mechanics of writing so hard that he can't think about what to write at the same time.

--

Call Andrew at McNatt Learning Center.

815-433-9500

Press 111 (his personal line)

Email: Handwriting@McNattLearningCenter.com

 

--

Peterson’s Phone toll free: 800-541-6328

--

very inexpensive. Only about $3 for a student book and about $5 for a teacher's manual. And because the only writing you actually do in the book is with your finger, you can reuse them. We bought a $.79 pad of lined paper from the local discount store.

 

http://www.cathyduffyreviews.com/handwriting/peterson-handwriting.htm

1st grade - one stroke at a time

2nd grade - slanted no-lift rhythm introduced

Transition to cursive - third grade

 

Form, slant, size, spacing, smoothness, and control are continually emphasized. Songs and rhythms that assist in teaching handwriting skills are available on an optional audiocassette ($5.95).

 

You can purchase a student book and teacher handbook for a level for about $10. Homeschool handwriting kits include the teacher and pupil books plus a self-adhesive Position Guide, and pencils or pen (depending upon the level). This is one of the few handwriting programs where the teacher’s manual is a necessity because it contains so much useful information.

--

A hs mom wrote:

Peterson Directed method helped me….

 

She start me out on slanted lines...just pages and pages of slanted lines...then spirals, counterclockwise without picking up the pen, pages and pages of that...then skinny spirals counterclockwise (such as you would make for a cursive looped lowercase d)...pags and pages of those...then she graduated me to circles, and eventually to letters, pages and pages of those...

 

Literally within a month I had perhaps the fifth most beautiful handwriting in my class. It took persistence on her part and lots of pages of spirals in all directions....my eyes, muscles and rhythm all had to be re-trained.

 

I had hideous public school chicken scratch.

 

Now I still get compliments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as her writing is reasonably legible, I wouldn't spend much time trying to remediate handwriting with a 5th grader. At her age, it's probably not going to get a huge amount better.

 

I would have her use the computer for writing wherever you care about content, and leave handwriting for things like spelling, or writing in workbooks.

 

She won't be doing much handwriting in college, or in her career life. There have always been people with lousy handwriting, plenty of them are doctors, so I figure handwriting isn't a hill I'm going to die on.

 

Michelle T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son (6th grade) has problems with handwriting too. I let him type a lot of his "written" work. And Handwriting Without Tears has been helpful with the handwriting. It's not elegant, but it is increasingly legible and fluid.

 

:iagree:

 

I'm doing the exact same thing with my 5th grader. A few minutes of HWT every day, and typing for IEW assignments and the like.

 

SBP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as her writing is reasonably legible, I wouldn't spend much time trying to remediate handwriting with a 5th grader. At her age, it's probably not going to get a huge amount better.

 

I would have her use the computer for writing wherever you care about content, and leave handwriting for things like spelling, or writing in workbooks.

 

She won't be doing much handwriting in college, or in her career life. There have always been people with lousy handwriting, plenty of them are doctors, so I figure handwriting isn't a hill I'm going to die on.

 

Michelle T

 

I completely disagree with this, for the following reasons:

 

1. Developmentally, some children only BEGIN to be ready to produce legible cursive writing at this age (9, 10, 11 years old). In fact, your daughter's brain might just be gearing up for a big leap in its ability to manage complex processes -- such as fluid, legible handwriting -- more automatically, so now is not the time to make premature judgments on what she will "probably never get any better at." Instead, now is the time to match the instruction to her brain's maturing ability to master a clear, legible script.

 

2. As for not using handwriting much in college.... What? Every essay test I ever took in college and graduate school involved pages and pages of handwriting. And don't think that professors don't judge the handwriting, that all they evaluate is the content. That simply isn't true, because if they can't read the essay, they'll never know how much content is in there. Handwriting is useful for many applications, all through a lifetime -- birthday cards, thank you notes, job applications, personal correspondence, checks, budgets, note-taking, journals, shopping lists, and teaching her own children someday (your grandchildren).

 

3. As for medical doctors' handwriting being poor.... Why make that the standard for your daughter's lifetime of writing? My husband works in the medical field with dozens of physicians -- those most notorious for poor handwriting. He can't even begin to count how many times the lack of this basic communication tool has nearly cost a person his or her life! In fact, this is one of the reasons why many physicians he has worked with have actually REMEDIATED their atrocious handwriting -- yes, these doctors have gone to great pains to get their handwriting up to a readable level. They realize that lives depend on their writing being READABLE.

 

4. Finally, how does your daughter feel about her own handwriting? Does she want to quit, and go through life feeling as though she never mastered handwriting, as though she has to hide her poor penmanship? Or does she want to master this basic skill and be proud of her hard work and accomplishment?

 

From my experience tutoring children in 4th-6th grades with poor penmanship, spelling, reading skills (and so on), I have become convinced that these communications skills are all linked -- and that they can take time to develop and synchronize. Give your daughter instruction in a clear, legible script and give her hand-eye-brain connection more time to develop. If in two years, with consistent instruction and time-on-task (practice), you don't see significant improvement, it probably would be a good idea to have your daughter evaluated by an Occupational Therapist who specializes in handwriting remediation. All of this of course assumes that you have had her vision evaluated recently. HTH.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote for HWT. My son had terrible handwriting, so I started last January with printing power (2nd grade printing). I had to re-teach him to form letters neatly and properly. Now he is finishing last pages of HWT cursive workbook. He actually writes neater than his dad!

 

Ideas: watch her like a hawk and make her redo ANY words that are not to your standard. So it takes some time? Who cares? All great things take time to learn. Check out my blog for a post about teaching handwriting:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...