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So You Really Want to Learn Spanish lesson questions


Colleen in NS
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I'm thinking of ordering Spanish 1 of SYRWTLS from Book Depository (free shipping???? How? AND they're cheaper than amazon.ca and Galore Park - how so???). From what I've read and researched, it contains more grammar training than other programs for middle grade kids. Would you say it's sort of like LC 1 and LC 2 (which will be completed by June here and then we're moving on to Henle 1) in the grammar training and grammar/vocab. memory work? If not, can it be adapted this way? How many lessons are in each level? How long does it take to go through Spanish 1? Spanish 2? Spanish 3? How long does it take to do a lesson each day? Is it reasonable to assume a child could do all three levels from grades 6-8? Why or why not? Or is it more towards high school level Spanish? What would you transition to in high school after doing level 3? What types of helps are in the TM?

 

Thank you!

Edited by Colleen in NS
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Each of the books is meant to last a year. I haven't used it, but we are using SY French: spending about 45 minutes a day with the latter (plus extra flashcard work for ten minutes a day or so) I'd expect to get through it in a year, more or less. The Spanish programme is designed for ages 10-13 or 13-16.

 

Laura

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Each of the books is meant to last a year. I haven't used it, but we are using SY French: spending about 45 minutes a day with the latter (plus extra flashcard work for ten minutes a day or so) I'd expect to get through it in a year, more or less. The Spanish programme is designed for ages 10-13 or 13-16.

 

Laura

 

Thanks, Laura, this is helpful.

 

Do you know, from your experience with GP and knowledge of the British school system, if this series through book 3 is meant to be just introductory to some type of high school/university Spanish course, or if it's a full grammar program? I'm not familiar with the schoolish terms on the GP website.

 

Side note: have you been to Cape Breton here in Canada? It's supposed to look a lot like Scotland, which I've never been to. But Cape Breton is beautiful.

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Check out Patricia in WA's answer to the cross-post on the Spanish Board. As usual, she is a wealth of info on this subject! :hurray:

 

Thank you, EvergreenEclecticAcademy! That was a thorough, awesome post :)

 

And I just posted another bunch of questions to her, if you want to keep following on the Spanish board. Her post *IS* very helpful!

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I just want to mention that Galore Park sells a set at a reduced rate of the SYRWTL Spanish. There's a section on the website that has special offers. It might be a better deal this way.

 

Best,

Anita

 

I saw that, too, when I followed a link for homeschoolers. It was for Spanish 1 books and CDs. Then I found the same things even cheaper on the Book Depository site, which offers free shipping!!

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Do you know, from your experience with GP and knowledge of the British school system, if this series through book 3 is meant to be just introductory to some type of high school/university Spanish course, or if it's a full grammar program? I'm not familiar with the schoolish terms on the GP website.

 

Side note: have you been to Cape Breton here in Canada? It's supposed to look a lot like Scotland, which I've never been to. But Cape Breton is beautiful.

 

The GP language programmes are meant to prepare students either for 13+ exams (which are competitive exams taken at age 13 that allow pupils to enter exclusive private schools) or GCSE (rough equivalent of SAT II subject tests, attempted at age 16 by most school children).

 

At the end of a GCSE course, the expectation would be that, should the pupil decide to continue with the language, s/he would be ready to start reading some foreign literature during the last two years of school, from age 16 to 18, so the GCSE course should lay a pretty firm grammar and vocabulary foundation.

 

No - I've never been to Canada; my father was evacuated to Saskatchewan during the war - that's the nearest I've come.

 

Do ask more questions if it would be helpful,

 

Laura

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The GP language programmes are meant to prepare students either for 13+ exams (which are competitive exams taken at age 13 that allow pupils to enter exclusive private schools) or GCSE (rough equivalent of SAT II subject tests, attempted at age 16 by most school children).

 

At the end of a GCSE course, the expectation would be that, should the pupil decide to continue with the language, s/he would be ready to start reading some foreign literature during the last two years of school, from age 16 to 18, so the GCSE course should lay a pretty firm grammar and vocabulary foundation.

 

Thank you, this is helpful.

 

I'm trying to liken it in my mind to the Latin progression we are taking. PL, LC1, LC2 (all 3 of which prepare you for Henle 1), then Henle 1 for 2 or 3 years, til end of 8th grade. My understanding is that Henle 1 is considered a first year high school course, teaching all the grammar. Then Henle 2-4 is application and reading. So, would you say that SYRWTLS is like the PL, LC1, LC2 progression, preparing for beginning high school level study? Or more along the lines of Henle 1, giving all the grammar, preparing for later high school study? I'm just clarifying, because it sounds like the GCSE course is the basic grammar for future study, but it doesn't start until age 16?

Edited by Colleen in NS
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So, would you say that SYRWTLS is like the PL, LC1, LC2 progression, preparing for beginning high school level study? Or more along the lines of Henle 1, giving all the grammar, preparing for later high school study? I'm just clarifying, because it sounds like the GCSE course is the basic grammar for future study, but it doesn't start until age 16?

 

It runs from age 14-16, then you take the GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) exam at 16. So it sounds like the equivalent of Henle: it prepares for later high school study, when the student will move into studying texts in the target language.

 

Best wishes

 

Laura

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It runs from age 14-16, then you take the GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) exam at 16. So it sounds like the equivalent of Henle: it prepares for later high school study, when the student will move into studying texts in the target language.

 

Best wishes

 

Laura

 

So, if I understood you correctly, possibly:

 

PL/LC1/LC2 = SYRWTLS each of which preps for Henle 1 and the GCSE course

 

Henle 1 = GCSE course both of which (we think) give you the foreign language vocab and grammar, preparing you for lit.

 

Henle 2-4 = 16-18 y.o. foreign lang. lit. course

 

See, what I'm trying to do is figure out what a North American would do after SYRWTLS, to continue Spanish studies. I'm thinking possibly a rigorous high school grammar course, like SOS Spanish 1 and 2 which I've never seen but have read about here on the boards.

 

Did I understand you correctly? Thanks so much for your patience in explaining!

Edited by Colleen in NS
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SY Spanish is a GCSE course. It would be used in the UK for ages 14 to 16, providing enough grammar and vocabulary to allow the student to study texts in the target language in following years.

 

For comparison:

 

I studied the equivalent of GCSE French. After completing it, at age 16, I went on to study French texts in the original language, including Candide.

 

So, if you use SY Spanish for ages 14 to 16, you should be able to start studying Spanish texts during ages 16 to 18.

 

I have been told that GCSE is roughly SAT subject test level - I don't know if that comparison helps or hinders us.....

 

Laura

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SY Spanish is a GCSE course. It would be used in the UK for ages 14 to 16, providing enough grammar and vocabulary to allow the student to study texts in the target language in following years.

 

For comparison:

 

I studied the equivalent of GCSE French. After completing it, at age 16, I went on to study French texts in the original language, including Candide.

 

So, if you use SY Spanish for ages 14 to 16, you should be able to start studying Spanish texts during ages 16 to 18.

 

I have been told that GCSE is roughly SAT subject test level - I don't know if that comparison helps or hinders us.....

 

Laura

 

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol: I'm determined to understand this!

 

I just went and combed over the GP website, reading things I missed the other day. I think I get it now, SYRWTLS *is* the GCSE course for Spanish. That sounds even better to me! So, possibly:

 

A 3 year Henle 1 study = SYRWTLS 1-3 GCSE course, each of which preps for future lit. study

 

Henle 2-4 lit. study = post GCSE course lit. study

 

*IF* (I hope, I hope) I get it now, I should go read more about SOS Spanish 1 and 2 to see how SYRWTLS would compare. Or how SYRWTLS would compare to a combo of Rosetta Stone and the Self Teaching Guide Practical Spanish Grammar (or maybe Advanced Grammar) as rec'd in WTM. Maybe SYRWTLS is equal, or maybe it surpasses these others, or maybe it meets in the middle of one of those combos. I'd like to find out. Jean in Wisc. might know, or might be able to help me figure it out - she uses SOS, but I digress...

 

Yes, the SAT subject test makes sense to me. We didn't have SAT subject tests when I was in high school in the States, but we had SATs around age 17-18.

 

Do I get it yet?

Edited by Colleen in NS
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So, possibly:

 

A 3 year Henle 1 study = SYRWTLS 1-3 GCSE course, each of which preps for future lit. study

 

Henle 2-4 lit. study = post GCSE course lit. study

 

*IF* (I hope, I hope) I get it now, I should go read more about SOS Spanish 1 and 2 to see how SYRWTLS would compare. Or how SYRWTLS would compare to a combo of Rosetta Stone and the Self Teaching Guide Practical Spanish Grammar (or maybe Advanced Grammar) as rec'd in WTM.

 

Good luck with the comparisons.

 

Laura

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