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beansprouts

So when do girls start to get "hormonal"

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My 9 1/2 year old has been weepy in the evenings. I don't know if it is because she is tired (she works hard for me during the day) or possibly hormonal. I think I have read here in the past that some girls do begin to have mood swings around this age. Thoughts?

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(Note to self)

Another thing I need to do tomorrow is ask Daddy to be particularly gentle with her. She seems to take criticism from him very personally right now.

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My oldest did this at age 9. She would cry at night, sobbing that she didn't know WHY she was crying. She wanted me near...every night. Finally she settled for an old nightshirt (oversized t-shirt) of mine. But every single night for quite a while I had to go downstairs and just talk to her about how she was growing up and sometimes she would just feel like crying "for no reason."

 

My immature (delays of 1-2 years in language as well as social/emotional skills) almost 9yo (she'll be 9 this month) has started the same thing. Somehow I thought it would happen later since she's behind. Apparently it's hormonal and not linked to her maturity otherwise!

 

:grouphug: I TOTALLY understand. (Dh does not :glare:).

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My oldest did this at age 9. She would cry at night, sobbing that she didn't know WHY she was crying. She wanted me near...every night. Finally she settled for an old nightshirt (oversized t-shirt) of mine.

 

Yes that's it! My dd says the same thing.

 

I will try to give her more "cuddle time" it is just so hard with a toddler and a preschooler. Unfortunately she is the one who usually gets left out. :(

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OMG. I can't believe this age is right around the corner. I wasn't even thinking about it because I've never been 'hormonal' except for the brief PPD stint after rapidly weaning my dd several years ago. Thanks for the reminder to be on the lookout as I think I may not be as sensitive a mommy as I should.

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So, I just told my DH that we have about 18 mos til dd (7.5) starts getting hormonal and he about fell off the chair. Is there a way to help them? Does knowing help? Geez. I was thinking about the Facts Of Life talk around 10 yoa....<sigh>

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*Insert fingers into ears* now repeat "I can't hear you" over and over (how else will I live in denial). My DD will be 9 in May.

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Yep. that is it, the age. We are in full blown pms now with our 12 year old...and me nearing menopause....lots of patience and a listening ear, and hot baths with hot milk and understanding brother and daddy...and, and, and...welcome to womanhood.

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Dd just turned 9 a couple wks ago, and this is her to a T! I keep thinking, "This seems like hormones, but it CANNOT be hormones already!" She came across some info in a science book, so we just had "the talk" so we're set there. She had a first pimple on her nose the other day :eek: and that really got me wondering. No other signs of body changes though.

 

I can't tell you how glad I am that I came across this thread. I will pour on the love and understanding. But......my baby!!! :blink:

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We are studying anatomy this year for science which does include health, nutrition, human development and sexuality. So "the talk" is already happening.

 

I think have been fairly sensitive, and now that my suspicions are concerned I will be even more so.

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My baby just turned 9 last week. Her body is beginning to change, but no emotions yet. More clingy with no explanation though --- "I just need to be with Mama right now."

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My sweet pumpkin began crying out of the blue, at night also, around the age of nine. She just had another episode last night. The reasons for her cry sessions are often almost laughable. The last night it was because daddy wouldn't let her drive the car in the parking lot (she is currently 12). These pseudo reasons put her into the most mournful crying jags you ever saw. I try to take it with a grain of salt. DH always thinks he has to "fix" whatever is wrong, so I usually end up kicking him out of the room, and just let her have her cry. It is definitely hormonal, but seems to also be linked to fatigue.

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I don't know if it's hormones, but things definitely changed for our dd at age 8. She simply could not control her emotions. She's much better now, at 12, than she was at 8 and 9.

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Wow! I am surprised to hear so many say this. I have five dds. The three oldest started their periods at 11 and I didn't notice any moodiness until about 6 months before they started. I was the same way, as was my mother before me. My 12 yr. old has not started yet but she has been really moody for about six months now so I am expecting any day now. The older girls don't really suffer from PMS nor do I so I am hoping things will improve once she actually starts.

 

All of my girls did go through a really annoying stage at 8. Almost as soon as they turned 9 they straightened right up and were great until the pre-pubesent period started. My youngest just passed the 9 yr. old mark and she is just now starting to improve. I have noticed the same thing in the neighbor girls so I thought that it was just a normal stage for little girls.

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that in Waldorf philosophy (which I don't espouse) they talk about a big change in 9 yr olds. So maybe there is something that goes on with that age that is noticeable other than hormones (or maybe it's the hormones they're noticing). It does seem weird for hormones to kick in that strongly years before puberty (for instance-hormonal moods at 9, period starts at 12.) Not impossible, just odd!

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My dd is 9 1/2 and we have been going on the emotional roller coaster for a few months now. It gets pretty nasty at our house some days--dd is going through puberty and I am menopausal. :lol:

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Here's a snippet from an article from the Keep Kids Healthy website:

 

"Normal puberty in girls is a complicated topic. To understand what is normal, we need to start with some basic information. Before any visible changes take place, hormonal changes are occurring for a couple of years. These hormonal changes start in the adrenal glands, two small organs that rest on top of either kidney. These hormones send signals to an area of the brain known as the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. The hypothalamus and the pituitary, in turn, send hormonal signals to the gonads, which in the case of girls, are the ovaries. This system of signaling takes a couple of years to become fully established, but once it does, then the physical, visible changes that we call puberty begin to take place."

 

It explains the emotional havoc our girls go through at this age :)

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I'd be sure to prepare her early. My dd started early and I was so thankful I'd given her the information and supplies way to early.:grouphug: It could be years or sooner, but to know it's normal can be very reassuring to the younger set.:grouphug:

 

:grouphug:I'd also say, prepare yourself momma. :grouphug:

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Here's a snippet from an article from the Keep Kids Healthy website:

 

"Normal puberty in girls is a complicated topic. To understand what is normal, we need to start with some basic information. Before any visible changes take place, hormonal changes are occurring for a couple of years. These hormonal changes start in the adrenal glands, two small organs that rest on top of either kidney. These hormones send signals to an area of the brain known as the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. The hypothalamus and the pituitary, in turn, send hormonal signals to the gonads, which in the case of girls, are the ovaries. This system of signaling takes a couple of years to become fully established, but once it does, then the physical, visible changes that we call puberty begin to take place."

 

It explains the emotional havoc our girls go through at this age :)

 

Thank you, Apryl!

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I'd be sure to prepare her early. My dd started early and I was so thankful I'd given her the information and supplies way to early.:grouphug: It could be years or sooner, but to know it's normal can be very reassuring to the younger set.:grouphug:

 

:grouphug:I'd also say, prepare yourself momma. :grouphug:

 

She knows.

 

I didn't start my period until I was 14. Don't most girls start at around the same age as their mothers? (Genetic link?)

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My dd started right in line with dh's side of the family, which was almost four years before I started. It was a shocker for me, and completely ordinary to my sil (her 2 dd) and mil.

 

She knows.

 

I didn't start my period until I was 14. Don't most girls start at around the same age as their mothers? (Genetic link?)

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posted that and cleared that up!

 

And yes, I felt that dd at just turned 9 was kind of young for the info, but it came up, so we talked it through. It seems SO young to me probably because I was almost 16 before I got my period, and the physical changes weren't really complete til almost 17. So I guess I was assuming history would repeat itself. I have no idea actually though if it's genetic or not. And I never thought about dh's side of the family-not sure how it was for them. I'll have to ask because now I'm interested!

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I don't know about genetics...

 

My mom started when she was around 10 or 11. I started at age 9! My oldest dd is 12, and still hasn't started, but she's close!

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Well, my dd just turned 10 in October and I would say she is really getting emotional and hormonal. An example: She has a 4 month old yorkie puppy. This is HER puppy and she is supposed to take care of her. My dh and I do help out. Yesterday, I asked her take the puppy out. Dh and I had both taken her out earlier. I heard her take her outside. Then I hear her stomping her feet and fussing on the back deck. I didn't really knwo what the deal was. A few minutes later I went down to the basement. She was laying under a pillow CRYING. I thought maybe she lost the puppy. She is tiny and we have a big yard that she can get lost in. She just told me through tears that it was just too much work and responsibility and she thought she had made a mistake! OH MY! Too much to take the dog potty? The puppy won't stay off the deck unless you stay out there with her. My dd just couldn't "handle" it. FWIW, I am pms'ing at the moment and I have often heard that female hormones sync. I am thinking that is the case here. I was thinking I had 2 more years before this, but it makes sense because my ds hit puberty early too. Can I go live in a timeshare somewhere until she is over this?

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Yes, I would say your daughter is probably starting to experience hormonal swings. Imagine my shock when my youngest got her first period at the age of 11! I was stunned---totally and completely unprepared for this! I've since found out that this early onset of puberty is not unheard of.

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She knows.

 

I didn't start my period until I was 14. Don't most girls start at around the same age as their mothers? (Genetic link?)

 

I didn't start until I was 12, going on 13. I really think my 10 year old dd will probably start in the next 6 months or so based on all the signs I am seeing. My 19 year old ds was in full blown puberty at around 11 as well. I blame it on the Tyson Chicken! :tongue_smilie:

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from in utero, and she's having mood swings and a pimple at age 9! :tongue_smilie: (I'm still hoping it'll be LONG while before full onset!)

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I didn't start until I was 12, going on 13. I really think my 10 year old dd will probably start in the next 6 months or so based on all the signs I am seeing. My 19 year old ds was in full blown puberty at around 11 as well. I blame it on the Tyson Chicken! :tongue_smilie:

 

 

That is another question I have. I try hard to feed my children natural, unprocessed foods and avoid soy products. Do you think girls are entering puberty earlier now than a generation or so ago, and do you think diet and environment are influencing this?

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Sure, it could be hormonal. I had a friend who reached menarche at 9, some reach it at 10, etc. The average length of puberty (which lasts AFTER menarche is reached, as there are 4 tanner stages, and I think menrache is in the 3rd, but it goes longer for sure) is 2-4 years, but some girls, such as mine, take longer than this from start to finish. My girlfriend's 9 yo (just 9 in August) started all this a few months before her 9th birthday, and appears to be following the path of her adult dd who reached menarch at 10.

 

But it could also be fatigue, especially if it's happening at the same time every day. Perhaps a break in her schedule could help.

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*Insert fingers into ears* now repeat "I can't hear you" over and over (how else will I live in denial). My DD will be 9 in May.

 

My sister was a lot older than 9 when her stuff started--just review family history as it's usually repeated.

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That is another question I have. I try hard to feed my children natural, unprocessed foods and avoid soy products. Do you think girls are entering puberty earlier now than a generation or so ago, and do you think diet and environment are influencing this?

 

Girls in the U.S. are, on average, entering puberty earlier, but specific children are not, if that make sense. It is not necessarily diet and/or environment (other than if obesity is a factor.) You can google for the research.

 

Our experience: My oldest was raised longer before we knew about organic and such, and she is blooming later than younger dd who has had more years of only had organic milk and mostly organic meat. So it has not made that difference in my daughters.

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I have found 9 in general to be one of the hardest ages for my girls so far. But 10 and 11 were a breeze, so have hope! :D

 

We haven't decided whether we are going to let her turn ten!!

 

It s a running joke in our home that dd is only going to be allowed to get so old, then she has to go backwards. In fact when she turned 9 last spring, I bought a "7" candle and put it on her birthday cake. She wasn't impressed! :lol:

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We haven't decided whether we are going to let her turn ten!!

 

It s a running joke in our home that dd is only going to be allowed to get so old, then she has to go backwards. In fact when she turned 9 last spring, I bought a "7" candle and put it on her birthday cake. She wasn't impressed! :lol:

 

You definitely had the right idea, LOL! :D

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Girls in the U.S. are, on average, entering puberty earlier, but specific children are not, if that make sense. It is not necessarily diet and/or environment (other than if obesity is a factor.) You can google for the research.

 

Our experience: My oldest was raised longer before we knew about organic and such, and she is blooming later than younger dd who has had more years of only had organic milk and mostly organic meat. So it has not made that difference in my daughters.

 

Well, how do we know that those hormones haven't already been denatured by cooking, anyway? Although I avoid them. Apparently plastics can contain estrogen like substances that are thought to be onc cause. As for soy, it would take a lot of soy to make a difference.

 

Obesity is definitely a factor, as fat produces a type of estrogen, which is why it's helpful to have a few exta pounds during menopause (but not too many!) However, my sister, who had what we called "baby fat" (she was not overweight, just not super skinny like I was) developed at a later age than I did by almost a year and a half. However, each of us fit right in with family history.

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My sweet pumpkin began crying out of the blue, at night also, around the age of nine. She just had another episode last night. The reasons for her cry sessions are often almost laughable. The last night it was because daddy wouldn't let her drive the car in the parking lot (she is currently 12). These pseudo reasons put her into the most mournful crying jags you ever saw. I try to take it with a grain of salt. DH always thinks he has to "fix" whatever is wrong, so I usually end up kicking him out of the room, and just let her have her cry. It is definitely hormonal, but seems to also be linked to fatigue.

 

She would wake up around 3 or 4 AM and couldn't go back to sleep for 2 or 3 hours, and sometimes not at all. At times, she was weepy and clingy, and had some irrational fears. For instance, she felt terrible guilt over some mistakes from the fairly distant past, such as lies she had told or having taken a toy or some small item that belonged to a friend or family member. I noticed that it was far worse when she was tired, which I'm sure she was, since she was not sleeping well.

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