Jump to content

Menu

Can I post another poll, please?... :D GTG, HOD, WP, MFW, or SL


MitchellMom
 Share

Which?  

  1. 1. Which?

    • Galloping the Globe
      17
    • Heart of Dakota (which one?)
      32
    • My Father's World
      36
    • Winterpromise
      19
    • Sonlight
      46


Recommended Posts

I'm sorry if I am annoying, LOL. I created one poll already and you all were so kind to vote and to help me narrow down my choices. I have since eliminated R&S, BJU, and Weaver from my list. But I still need help - you all did such a fantastic job describing your reasons for choosing curriculums that I ended up feeling confused still :lol:

 

Here is the information I posted in the other poll: I'm trying to decide which curriculum to buy for my dd for when she is officially 5. We will be using Singapore Earlybird Math as soon as it arrives in the mail. This is what I'm considering:

 

1. Galloping the Globe: She loves geography, as does my husband (and it's growing on me!), so I thought that if we find a curriculum that focuses on her primary interest, she will really enjoy it. Also, though I'm still shifting through my ideas, I do believe learning geography is important before learning history.

 

2. Heart of Dakota: Have heard great things about them but really do not know which curriculum to choose. Beyond Little Hearts for His Glory, since dd is an emerging reader? Or simply Little Hearts for His Glory, since she is not an expert writer yet?

 

3. Winterpromise: I'm intrigued by their K animals curriculum. However, it is only science and some literature, correct? So I would need to add history, math, etc.?

 

4. My Father's World K or 1st: K introduces phonics and dd does not really need this, but maybe the rest of the curriculum is age-appropriate for her? Or should I go with 1st grade?

 

5. Sonlight K

 

I prefer a curriculum that basically is open and go, and I prefer Living Books.

 

 

Please vote, and if you can, tell me why you chose what you did....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2. Heart of Dakota: Have heard great things about them but really do not know which curriculum to choose. Beyond Little Hearts for His Glory, since dd is an emerging reader? Or simply Little Hearts for His Glory, since she is not an expert writer yet?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

It is really hard to say. Your child being 5 yo may get bogged down with Beyond or she may not. But then I think that *if* you decided to stick with HOD there is even more of a chance that she would get bogged down with the next level, Bigger, because she would be working out of R&S's grammar text. Seems like I have heard of 6 yo's doing that, but more often than not people wait till 3rd grade to start it instead of doing it in first. Goodness, did I make any since?

 

So my thoughts are that if you do decide to go with Beyond, then you might want to take it at half speed. Second, how badly do you want to do World Hx first. Little Hearts has a fantastic little history book and a Bible story book that begin your year with World and then an Am reader ends the year with American. The world book is very gentle and do not touch on things that are a concern in the article at Beautiful Feet. They are simple, sweet stories.

 

Are you familiar with the Burgess books? These are great read alouds that are used in Little Hearts. They are animal stories that teach character. Does your dd sit and listen to stories with no pictures? Little Hearts will give practice in that area with the Burgess books. There are a few pics, but not many.

 

Little Hearts also has things like covering a jingle to teach the days of the week. This simple, cute little song has even my 3 1/2 yo memorizing the days of the week.

 

Hope these questions help you in deciding what will be the better fit. I can't do the same with questions on the Beyond side as I don't have that set yet. Maybe someone else can. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2. Heart of Dakota: Have heard great things about them but really do not know which curriculum to choose. Beyond Little Hearts for His Glory, since dd is an emerging reader? Or simply Little Hearts for His Glory, since she is not an expert writer yet?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

It is really hard to say. Your child being 5 yo may get bogged down with Beyond or she may not. But then I think that *if* you decided to stick with HOD there is even more of a chance that she would get bogged down with the next level, Bigger, because she would be working out of R&S's grammar text. Seems like I have heard of 6 yo's doing that, but more often than not people wait till 3rd grade to start it instead of doing it in first. Goodness, did I make any since?

 

So my thoughts are that if you do decide to go with Beyond, then you might want to take it at half speed. Second, how badly do you want to do World Hx first. Little Hearts has a fantastic little history book and a Bible story book that begin your year with World and then an Am reader ends the year with American. The world book is very gentle and do not touch on things that are a concern in the article at Beautiful Feet. They are simple, sweet stories.

 

Are you familiar with the Burgess books? These are great read alouds that are used in Little Hearts. They are animal stories that teach character. Does your dd sit and listen to stories with no pictures? Little Hearts will give practice in that area with the Burgess books. There are a few pics, but not many.

 

Little Hearts also has things like covering a jingle to teach the days of the week. This simple, cute little song has even my 3 1/2 yo memorizing the days of the week.

 

Hope these questions help you in deciding what will be the better fit. I can't do the same with questions on the Beyond side as I don't have that set yet. Maybe someone else can. :)

 

I do think she would get bogged down with "Beyond" because I think it would be too much for her. But if I go with Little Hearts, where do I find the appropriate-level reader books to order with the curriculum? Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do think she would get bogged down with "Beyond" because I think it would be too much for her. But if I go with Little Hearts, where do I find the appropriate-level reader books to order with the curriculum? Thanks!

 

You could use the Emerging readers that are used in Beyond. Just let her read from them. Or you can do your own readers: Dick and Jane, Pathway, Rod and Staff, ABeka or most anything really. HOD is flexible that way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I voted MFW K because it is a well rounded, biblical based program. The TM is open and go, it tells you exactly how to implement it, and everything you need (maniulatives) for the program is included in the package. So you don't have to spend extra time/money on making it 100%.

 

Even though your child would be at a higher reading level, you could use the program as a whole and add in extra reading and/or instruction at her level.

 

Don't forget Math: Here is a description for the math

"math is taught using an informal, integrated approach. Many skills are woven into the lessons, as students cut an apple in half, measure and compare the lengths of dinosaurs and whales, and order leaves by size. All typical kindergarten goals are taught, including counting objects, writing numerals, preparing and understanding charts and graphs, comparing, classifying, sequencing, and understanding ordinal numbers, fractions (whole/half), clocks, money, and an introduction to addition and subtraction."

 

Then you have the other subjects of the program:

 

"Science, Bible, Creative Thinking, Character Development, and Art are also integrated into the 26 easy-to-teach thematic units. Each six-day unit focuses on one alphabet letter and one corresponding science topic. For example, in Lesson 1, "S-s-sun," students learn letter "s" and number 1, study about the sun, construct and use a sundial, observe and chart grapes as they become raisins, paint a sun, listen to a funny book about shadows, and learn that, like the sun, Jesus is the light of the world.

 

A special feature is the focus on character development integrated into each lesson. The turtle lesson teaches, "I don't quit -- I persevere!" The horse lesson teaches, "I obey right away." The zebra lesson teaches, "I can't hide anything from God."

 

Daily Lessons are 60-90 minutes long, with a total of 166 lessons."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sonlight.

 

If I were to ever use another "open and go" program, it would be SL. It is Biblical and uses living books galore. I have a friend who uses it and LOVES it and it is great if you have more than one child coming up to use it because most of it is non-consumable. :) (Also meaning it can be re-sold after use for a reasonable price).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

K introduces phonics and dd does not really need this, but maybe the rest of the curriculum is age-appropriate for her? Or should I go with 1st grade?

 

If I can, for just a moment, I would like to tell you WHY an open and go curriculum didn't work for us. What you said in the above quote is EXACTLY why. My kids are not all one level. We started with Calvert and while I think they have a good program (don't get me wrong), it was cumbersome and didn't fit either of my kids. I spent hours on the phone with the advisors only to choose Calvert K for my 5 y/o (at the time not even 5 yet) who was a beginning reader. He was sounding out words by himself already. I thought that if I didn't get the K, then he would be missing something. WRONG. It was boring him to tears. It was boring ME to tears. He was way ahead in many areas. Other places, we touched on things he hadn't learned, but that I felt he didn't really need to learn at that point anyway. Overall, it was a waste of a LOT of money and what I learned was...don't buy a boxed curriculum. I thought I was failing my kids by NOT getting something comprehensive, but no. I failed them WITH the other. Now, we do our own things and the kids are learning at their own pace. My oldest is catching up in math, my youngest is reading 1st grade materials - and I am relaxed in knowing that they are working right where they need to be. Just something to maybe ponder as you make your decision. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I can, for just a moment, I would like to tell you WHY an open and go curriculum didn't work for us. What you said in the above quote is EXACTLY why. My kids are not all one level. We started with Calvert and while I think they have a good program (don't get me wrong), it was cumbersome and didn't fit either of my kids. I spent hours on the phone with the advisors only to choose Calvert K for my 5 y/o (at the time not even 5 yet) who was a beginning reader. He was sounding out words by himself already. I thought that if I didn't get the K, then he would be missing something. WRONG. It was boring him to tears. It was boring ME to tears. He was way ahead in many areas. Other places, we touched on things he hadn't learned, but that I felt he didn't really need to learn at that point anyway. Overall, it was a waste of a LOT of money and what I learned was...don't buy a boxed curriculum. I thought I was failing my kids by NOT getting something comprehensive, but no. I failed them WITH the other. Now, we do our own things and the kids are learning at their own pace. My oldest is catching up in math, my youngest is reading 1st grade materials - and I am relaxed in knowing that they are working right where they need to be. Just something to maybe ponder as you make your decision. :)

 

Thank you for sharing this. Is Sonlight not considered a boxed curriculum, then? Since you piece together everything on your own?...

 

Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a daughter, now 7, who is an advanced reader but no an advanced writer. Whatever program you do choose, I would advise fitting it to her writing skills and supplement the reading if you need to. My daughter still gets extremely frustrated with writing but her reading sails along. I have also found that if some of the reading is easier for her, it helps to boost her confidence with the writing part. Having said all of that, we did use SL K and it was pretty successful. I do not have any experience with their LA program though from what I have seen, it is a little dry. I personally would use nothing but SL but the reading is just overwhelming for my daughter (she does not like reading fiction at all - non-fiction only) with not enough hands on action mixed in there. Good luck with your choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do think she would get bogged down with "Beyond" because I think it would be too much for her. But if I go with Little Hearts, where do I find the appropriate-level reader books to order with the curriculum? Thanks!

 

Yes, you would use the emergent readers set with LHFHG, and then if you decided to use Beyond the following year, simply move on to Drawn Into the Heart of Reading level 2. I'm not sure if this is ok but I found a thread that might help you on the HOD board.

 

http://www.heartofdakota.com/board3/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1391&p=14861&hilit=little+hearts+emergent+reader#p14861

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's another thread that has some links to differences between HOD and MFW...thought you might like that as well. I do encourage you to contact Carrie directly as she is extremely friendly and loves to help answer any questions or address concerns you may have.

 

http://www.heartofdakota.com/board3/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1616&p=12592&hilit=little+hearts+emergent+reader#p12592

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could use the Emerging readers that are used in Beyond. Just let her read from them. Or you can do your own readers: Dick and Jane, Pathway, Rod and Staff, ABeka or most anything really. HOD is flexible that way.

 

I didn't answer the poll because you have some good choices there, but I agree with the pp that starting with Beyond in HOD would likely be too much. I would go with Little Hearts in your case. It does include the Burgess books that she could try reading from, or any other readers of your choice. While your dd may be beginning reading already, you might want to take a look at the second half of Reading Made Easy and see if that isn't beyond her yet. RME is one of the phonics choices recommended in Little Hearts and actual stories for practice reading are built into it, so she would get practice right from the book. The only "readers" my oldest dd ever used in addition to RME were some Dr. Seuss books, then she went on to real books. You also have to consider the other skills that are built into the program, as Susie and others have mentioned. Fine motor skills, handwriting, art, Bible/devotionals, music... All these may well be closer to her true 5yo age. Also, since you're planning to use Singapore Earlybird anyway, you're all set for math if you use Little Hearts. ;)

 

And in the back of the Little Hearts manual are further suggestions for using it with a 1st grader, so even there you will find ideas for your dd in the areas where the K plans seem too easy.

 

All that said, I think that MFW K is also a great choice. It's very similar to HOD in both philosophy and age-appropriateness, and I would give the same recommendations re: reading skill vs. other skills whether you go with MFW or HOD. Don't jump ahead to MFW 1st *or* Beyond (HOD) just because she's an emerging reader. You really don't want to get ahead of yourself. (I know it's hard to do when you firstborn is already reading and seems very mature, but trust me on this!)

 

I personally think that SL is *too much* at this age... too much maturity-wise, too much time, and too expensive. There's a list of 27 reasons NOT to use SL somewhere on their website. Be sure to read through that before purchasing anything. (You may decide SL is fine for your family... I'm just letting you know so you can make an informed decision.)

 

I have Gall the Globe and use it as a *resource*. I like it for ideas, but it's definitely not open-and-go.

 

Winterpromise -- I say the same thing about that as SL. To me, WP looked like just another SL "wannabe" except with more hands-on activities. (No tomatoes, please!) I've not actually used it, though.

 

So between HOD and MFW (my recommendations)... Spend some time browsing both the HOD and MFW boards and ask lots of questions. Read through the archives on their forums. I also like to recommend printing out their sample lesson plans both for the year in question AND the years following so that you can get an overview of where the program is headed. This can help you make a better decision for the year at hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I picked GTG but from my initial impression it isn't totally open and go. This is my strongest candidate for next year, combined with FIAR. I wanted to do a year or two of geography before I started the history cycle.

 

 

 

 

:iagree:I am thinking of doing the same thing for next year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I said in your last poll - I really think a combo of GTG and SLK (or FIAR) is the best bet - focus on geography, mixture of activities, and great books. But if you really want something truly open and go, I'd have to vote for SL K. I think it would be best...great and challenging (in a good way!) books and easy-easy schedule.

 

So, in terms of the poll - I could only pick one, so I voted for SL. But if you could do both GTG and SL, it would be fantastic. I would do this by making GTG the spine and adding SL books where they fit in (you wouldn't even need the IG). I am doing this with my preK and 1st graders: a mix of GTG, FIAR, and SL K-1 (easier since I already have all the books on my bookshelf).

 

You're on the right track...but whatever you pick, you'll have to give up on something else. That's the tough part - choosing the most important things for you and your family right now and teaching to those things and saying good-bye, maybe next time to all the other options. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From your new choice list I voted Winter Promise.

 

I have used many, many years of SL (Cores 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 100, 300, 400), one year of WP (American Story II), two years of A Beka (K-1), and now currently using TOG. I have not used any of the other choices on your list. HOD was non existent way back then, and MFW has never intrigued me in the least possible way. :tongue_smilie:

 

If your dd likes to be read to...a lot...and she does not care about hands-on stuff like crafts, projects, coloring, etc., then SL would be a fine solid choice. SL is a wonderful company to purchase from and even though I no longer use their curriculum, I feel very loyal to them.

 

But, having said that....

 

I personally think WP's Animals and Their Worlds would be perfect for a K'er. Yes, WP is expensive if you buy new (so is SL). What I did was purchase all of the WP exclusive items and spine books, and then got the rest of my books from the library. Of course, if you plan to use the program with upcoming children someday, then it's always nice to buy new. ;)

 

WP is open and go without the reading overload that I often felt with SL. WP uses wonderful books with LOTS and LOTS of colorful pictures....very important to visual learners and most young children. They schedule you lots of activities each week to pick and choose from. My son does NOT like activities at all. He would much rather read about how a boat is made, see pictures of said boat, than to MAKE said boat. He personally thinks crafts are a waste of his time (most children do not feel this way...especially k'ers), so when we used WP we did none of the listed crafts. We still had a fantastic year! The crafts are not integral to the program, they are there for you to pick and choose from.

 

WP has several LA programs for that age as well: A basic K, an Advanced K, an Accelerated Reading kit, Fast-Track Phonics, and if she is reading well enough you could get the 1st grade LA with readers that correspond to Animals and Their Worlds.

 

As for learning about animals all year, keep in mind that your dd is in KINDERGARTEN....she does not need history at this age. Kindergarten should be high interest and fun with lots of hands-on learning (my opinion of course). I think WP Animals and Their Worlds fits the bill nicely. ;)

 

If you do not have catalogs of each program you are considering, I would start there. I feel having the catalog on-hand helps to see the big picture more clearly than viewing online cattys.

 

Regardless of what you decide to use, any teaching she gets will be worthwhile. All the programs on your list are considered good programs. I say "Go with your gut"....after lots of catty browsing, of course. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I chose WP Animals and Their Worlds. I used it for a first grader and will be using it next year for a K student. Because you want "open and go", Galloping the Globe is not a good idea. (it requires loads of library time). Since your girl has a geography interest and you expressed concern about a lack of history/social studies in AW you could possibly use GTG as a *supplement*, which is what I'm doing this year with WP's American Story 1. There's also quite a bit about GTG which will sail over a K student's head.

 

To WP's AW, I add a WP LA program, BJU Math, and God Made Music. For K I don't worry about "social studies". For my oldest ds I had a ps social studies text on hand but it was SO baby-fied that I had to leave it on the shelf.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everyone gave such good advice, but here is what I agree with the most:

 

1. Don't worry so much about a formal structured history or science program for a 5 year old. Now, I say that with a smirk (that you can't see of course!) because 5 months ago I was YOU! LOL I wanted one program, the perfect one of course, to meet all the areas I thought my DD needed. She is advanced in Reading like your DD and she is a Science NUT. I thought I was short-changing her if I went "light" (esp in Science), which is what every K program seemed to be (light in Sci). In retrospect, I should have chose something solid (like HOD, MFW or SL) and just gone with it -and added if I needed to - it's only Kinder!!!! (I can't tell you how many wonderful moms here tried to give me that advice 5 months ago - if I had only LISTENED! At least it's sinking in now!) It didn't help that I was a former Gifted and Talented Specialist in the public schools. I wanted everything to be advanced and "cutting edge" because that is how I taught! But I didn't teach 5 year olds! And that also isn't necessary for every child.

 

2. You will likely never use just one program. It's impossible, IMHO if you are trying to match every need your DD has *exactly*. So find something that has MOST of what you need and either supplement or skip what you don't want to use. Which program really *speaks* to you?

 

If you want to do Geography, then check out children's atlases, read about countries, make maps, make lapbooks about Geo topics. Just make it light and fun and don't worry about finding a program that has Geography integrated into it. Because IF you find that, then there will likely be something else you don't like about it and you may start reevaluating all over again.

 

Also really think about your lifestyle and preferences as a teacher and pick the program that you think will be the easiest for you to actually DO, that appeals to you content wise in the main subjects that it covers, and will match your DD's learning preferences (see below for more on that) If you think there are possibly two or three that *fit*, then print out the sample lesson plans from each one and try them. If you still can't decide, then just pick one and do it - you'll never know until you try and you may be like me and waste an entire semester searching for what probably doesn't exist (at least like you think you want it).

 

Once you pick the program that is easiest for you and that matches DD's style, then it's VERY easy to add and change later.

 

Heart of Dakota is probably my top pick for this age. If she's just turning 5, then go with Little and add the emerging readers pack. You already are doing Singapore math, so that would be a good fit!! I think this is such a good curriculum for 5 year olds.

 

Sonlight K- if she is old enough to sit and listen for long periods of time and you think she would ENJOY that, then it would work. But honestly, I'd wait until next year to look at that again. (mainly due to how much read aloud time and the topics) Keep in mind though that after buying SL's core (history, read alouds, Bible) you will need to add in LA (but you could choose the program you like) and Math (which you already have coming) and Science (if you chose SL K - SL 4/5 has Science built in very lightly)

 

Winterpromise Animal Worlds - this just looks fun. Does your DD like craft stuff? Do YOU like crafty stuff? You could easily get this in addition to HOD to jazz up the reading and science :) Or get HOD for now and then add WP AW in the fall.

 

I can't speak to MFW but like another poster, it never appealed to me. But I know so many people who love it. You have to decide how Bible centered you want your entire curriculum to be (because MFW has Bible in every subject from what I've heard/seen)

 

GTG, like I said in my other post, was too much work for me. I WANTED IT TO WORK SO BADLY!! LOL I was just like you in that I thought Kinder would be the perfect year for Geography. But I spent so much time planning it, I gave up. I did buy some of the books from it and we use those here and there.

 

Also, not to add another choice, but there is Moving Beyond the Page. It's secular, but it has geography components in several of it's units. We are using the "culture" unit for the Spring Semester and this unit starts with Geography. It is the level for 7-9 year olds, but I'm just adapting it (my 6 yr old can't handle some of what it requires in every part of it yet, but I will just pick and choose) The book choices/reccs are great :)

 

So, in summary, I would just jump in and pick one thing for now, use it, get to know it and then add in what you need as you go. It's very hard to make the perfect choice without actually just trying stuff out. At least you have it narrowed down :) :) But seriously, it will be easier for you to know what you will need once you are knee deep in *something* :) :) (and again, my vote is for HOD, but only you know what appeals to you most)

 

HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer Sl as I like the discussion questions. My kids really have loved all the stories. I tried WP AW and they hated it. They never would sit still and didnt like any of the books. I was terrified to spend the money this year on SL but they love SL now. No complaints. We are even loving the LA portion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I voted for HOD. At that age, it would be a wonderful program to work with. You could check the graph at the HOD sight and that does a really wonderful job helping you to place your child if you torn between two programs. They also have a very supportive message board to help with placement questions as well.

 

We used bits and pieces of MFW K and 1st. If HOD had existed back then, I most likely would have used HOD instead. They are both very good programs though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today, (lol) I am planning on using a combo of GTG & WP. I am combining the two and am choosing it because I don't believe they are open and go. I want lots of freedom, especially since I am going to be adapting them to a younger 4/5 year old. So, my reasons for choosing those, may be reasons for you not to!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am with Melissa and Jennifer.

 

To be honest you don't HAVE to do both science and history every year, so doing AW alone would be fine. You could use SL LA with it, or WP LA or something else entirely (I am still using the 2002 SL LA K I bought my oldest dd for my ds now). You could also take the really easy route and just do some Evan-Moor history pockets and call that history. :D You are not going to ruin them at this age no matter what you choose. Even through I did SL for a couple of years with a hands on learner (my 2nd dd) she survived. :D

 

Heather

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am with Melissa and Jennifer.

 

To be honest you don't HAVE to do both science and history every year, so doing AW alone would be fine. You could use SL LA with it, or WP LA or something else entirely (I am still using the 2002 SL LA K I bought my oldest dd for my ds now). You could also take the really easy route and just do some Evan-Moor history pockets and call that history. :D You are not going to ruin them at this age no matter what you choose. Even through I did SL for a couple of years with a hands on learner (my 2nd dd) she survived. :D

 

Heather

 

I agree, K is for fun and exploration- you can't mess it up or pick the wrong thing! :)

 

I voted for GtG since you said that's what she's interested in and soon enough there will be required subjects, so I'd go with her interests and keep it fun. I used GtG with a 1st grader and ker, just for fun exploration, because that was what my 1st grader was interested in. We all loved it, but it's not open and go. I went through the guide and created my own schedule based on the books available at my library and our personal preferences. I did buy Children Just Like Me since it's used a lot and I thought it was a worthwhile book to own. We made one related craft or recipe a week.

 

If she likes paper crafts and non-fiction books with lots of pictures, then AW might work also. I own this program and have attempted it several times but never stuck with it, I don't know why I didn't like it, but I didn't. And we are huge animal lovers in our family. I think it's because I really prefer reading stories and when my kids were younger, it drove me nuts doing so much "product" art and sitting there cutting things out while they watched. I am about to attempt this program for the third time because my dd is an animal freak and has requested it, I think it will be doable because she is reading fluently and can do the crafts on her own. It's a lot of paper crafts, and not quite the nature study program I had hoped it would be, but I don't think we were utilizing the program properly. All of that rambling to say, I would consider what kind of books you and your dd prefer.

 

That bring me to SL Core K. I own this core and love it, the introduction to history is just right. My visual learner liked the Usborne books while my dd got plenty of story books, which is her preference. But some of the topics are mature (homelessness, Nazi germany, and more), so I would consider how sensitive your dd is. Most people at SL recommend doing a core below actual grade level, I think it depends on the child. And your child has to really like being read to, and be ready for chapter books without pictures. The chapter books are short, and some have pictures, but there are a few longer ones and many have small or black and white pictures.

 

MFW is a nice curriculum, but I haven't used K. I think it looks very sweet but personally, won't use it with my ds for K because he's reading so far beyond it. I know you can use something else for phonics, but I guess I personally don't want to do that. Can't offer any personal experience with it.

 

Have fun choosing!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree, K is for fun and exploration- you can't mess it up or pick the wrong thing! :)

 

I voted for GtG since you said that's what she's interested in and soon enough there will be required subjects, so I'd go with her interests and keep it fun. I used GtG with a 1st grader and ker, just for fun exploration, because that was what my 1st grader was interested in. We all loved it, but it's not open and go. I went through the guide and created my own schedule based on the books available at my library and our personal preferences. I did buy Children Just Like Me since it's used a lot and I thought it was a worthwhile book to own. We made one related craft or recipe a week.

 

If she likes paper crafts and non-fiction books with lots of pictures, then AW might work also. I own this program and have attempted it several times but never stuck with it, I don't know why I didn't like it, but I didn't. And we are huge animal lovers in our family. I think it's because I really prefer reading stories and when my kids were younger, it drove me nuts doing so much "product" art and sitting there cutting things out while they watched. I am about to attempt this program for the third time because my dd is an animal freak and has requested it, I think it will be doable because she is reading fluently and can do the crafts on her own. It's a lot of paper crafts, and not quite the nature study program I had hoped it would be, but I don't think we were utilizing the program properly. All of that rambling to say, I would consider what kind of books you and your dd prefer.

 

That bring me to SL Core K. I own this core and love it, the introduction to history is just right. My visual learner liked the Usborne books while my dd got plenty of story books, which is her preference. But some of the topics are mature (homelessness, Nazi germany, and more), so I would consider how sensitive your dd is. Most people at SL recommend doing a core below actual grade level, I think it depends on the child. And your child has to really like being read to, and be ready for chapter books without pictures. The chapter books are short, and some have pictures, but there are a few longer ones and many have small or black and white pictures.

 

MFW is a nice curriculum, but I haven't used K. I think it looks very sweet but personally, won't use it with my ds for K because he's reading so far beyond it. I know you can use something else for phonics, but I guess I personally don't want to do that. Can't offer any personal experience with it.

 

Have fun choosing!

 

Thank you. I was wondering what people meant when they said SL K had serious issues. Thank you for telling me that these issues include homelessness, Nazi Germany, etc. What are the other issues?

 

My daughter loves loves loves to be read to, even chapter books with no pictures. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. I was wondering what people meant when they said SL K had serious issues. Thank you for telling me that these issues include homelessness, Nazi Germany, etc. What are the other issues?

 

My daughter loves loves loves to be read to, even chapter books with no pictures. :)

 

I don't really think any of it is that bad, but that's just my opinion; I was expecting a lot worse. The Nazi book (Twenty and Ten might be scary to some kids, because while there is nothing graphic, there are Jewish children in hiding and it's suspenseful and might be too much for younger kids. My dd is very sensitive, so I knew it was too much for her at the time and skipped it. The book about a homeless family, The Family Under the Bridge, I think is kind of sweet and fun, but it does touch on a serious subject. Nothing bad happens and the book doesn't go into the most of the realities of living on the streets. I actually felt I had to supplement our discussion a bit with how hard and dangerous that would really be. The Apple and the Arrow is about William Tell and it can be boring and hard to understand for some younger kids. Mary on Horseback is about the Frontier Nursing Service in the 1920, this one I skipped due to my sensitive dd and I haven't even read it myself yet, so can't tell you for sure, but I did hear there are some sad things- a baby or small child gets burned badly or dies if I'm remembering right. The Hundred Dresses involves a girl being picked on which some younger kids might not understand. Those are the only stories I would worry about, and if you do go with Core K, you can always pre-read them and decide if they're suitable, and if not you can put them aside and read them later. The couple that I skipped I substituted easily with books like Stuart Little and Pippi Longstocking. And there are a lot of other stories in the core, many gems. The Boxcar Children, The Wizard of Oz, Cappyboppy, James Herriots Treasury for Children, My Father's Dragon, and Dr.Dolittle were, and still are, all well loved here.

 

Overall, I love this core and it's one of my favorite SL cores- I've used P3/4, P4/5, K, 1, 3+4, 6, and 7. Sonlight is my favorite and the books are always great- since your dd likes being read to it might be a good fit. Although I do think a 6 year old will get more out of it than a 5 year old. Still, I was surprised when I got the core by how many of the books were short and had short chapters or had pictures, after all I had heard about it being advanced.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. I was wondering what people meant when they said SL K had serious issues. Thank you for telling me that these issues include homelessness, Nazi Germany, etc. What are the other issues?

 

My daughter loves loves loves to be read to, even chapter books with no pictures. :)

 

I agree with Nicole that it really is dependent on the child. My oldest did Core K when she was 5 and was fine with it. She could have done all of SL at grade level all the way through and been fine with it. My now 9yo would probably STILL be upset by several of the stories in core K. My 7yo has heard most of them, but I did skip several for the benefit of my 9yo, she isn't as sensitive as my 2nd dd, but she isn't like my oldest either. I am still doing Pre-K stories with my 6yo, but I think he is going to be like my oldest.

 

Now my 9yo is probably more like them than I want to admit. Though I do a good job of hiding it and playing tough guy I am really pretty sensitive. I cried as some point it almost all the SL RA's. I end up crying at almost every church service (and I go to a conservative, sit in your seat, proper Baptist church-not emotional). When I was little I can remember avoiding things that upset me, which included most fairy tales because they ended badly. I didn't get the point behind them I just was upset that someone died, and I think my 9yo is pretty much the same way.

 

There might be some spoilers here.

 

The Apple & the Arrow is very suspenseful, and while it doesn't really have any content beyond that my dd asked to stop reading it daily (I wasn't smart enough to at that time).

 

The Boxcar Children-The parents have died when the book opens. DD didn't mind this one so much.

 

Dolphin Treasure-The guy pushes his treasure hunting too far and almost dies as a result. Suspenseful, dd didn't like it.

 

Family Under the Bridge-Opens with the father having died and the family homeless. For most of the book they are homeless. Dd really didn't like this one.

 

The Hundred Dresses-One of my all time favorites, but deals with extreme teasing due to race and being poor. So extreme the family moves away. The mother has died in the story, but it starts out that way. The meaning behind this story will move most adults, but looking at it from the literal child I was I would have just seen a bunch of cruelty that they got away with and I would not have liked it (I would have missed the impact of the ending).

 

The Light at Tern Rock- Again it doesn't end with the ideal, so I would have hated it as a child.

 

Mary on Horseback is one that replaced an OOP book since I used Core K. I was told it has scenes where a child catches fire, and is left scared. Also that a mother dies in childbirth, and then the baby almost starves as the Father doesn't know how to feed it.

 

The Story of Dr. Doolittle-back to the literal child. I hated this story as a child, didn't get it at all, and my 9yo is the same.

 

Twenty and Ten-this is the Nazi title. Nothing really bad happens it is all the threatening of bad. They threaten the childrens lives, the nun's life and also threatens physical abuse. I softened the language when I read it to my oldest, but didn't even attempt it with my 9yo. The story ends well though, it is just the suspense in between that would get her.

 

Wizard of Oz-This again was too weird for me as a child. I didn't get any of the symbolism, and it just seemed so unfair at every turn. My 9yo doesn't like it either.

 

 

As an adult I now appreciated most of the stories. I think Dr. Doolittle and Family Under the Bridge were the two I still could take or leave. I explained the connections to my oldest and she appreciated them and loves all the stories. While I did explain them to my literal child as well it went over her head entirely. I just know she still isn't seeing it. She probably will in a year or so when logic level thinking begins to dawn.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Heather

 

 

Edited by siloam
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I voted WP. I used SL K when my oldest ds was 5. I'm using AW w/ my 7 and 5 yo dss and we are enjoying it! I don't remember who said it, but K should be fun! Even though my 7 yo is technically 2nd grade, he was too young to add-in w/ his older brothers (they're doing Quest for the Middle Ages). Last year I folded him into the Ancients, but doing it w/ older siblings, he just got pushed aside most of the time.

 

We are having a ball w/ AW. I like that the reading isn't as heavy as SL K. I also prefer WP's LA. And knowing I would continue w/ the other programs from WP it just made sense to start my younger ones w/ a WP program.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for sharing this. Is Sonlight not considered a boxed curriculum, then? Since you piece together everything on your own?...

 

Thank you!

 

Sonlight is kind of considered a "core," but it does recommend what you use for other subects that aren't covered in the core...and many people use what they suggest. I do not personally use sonlight, but the friend I have that uses it does the Core, the she adds in MUS, Sonlight Science, and Artistic Pursuits, I think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Nicole that it really is dependent on the child. My oldest did Core K when she was 5 and was fine with it. She could have done all of SL at grade level all the way through and been fine with it. My now 9yo would probably STILL be upset by several of the stories in core K. My 7yo has heard most of them, but I did skip several for the benefit of my 9yo, she isn't as sensitive as my 2nd dd, but she isn't like my oldest either. I am still doing Pre-K stories with my 6yo, but I think he is going to be like my oldest.

 

We read most of these stories when my kids were 7 and nearing 6, and that was much better for them. No way were they ready at 5 for that core. Even at 7 and 6, I had to put a few aside. But my 4 year old could probably do Core K next year for his K year, he is a different personality type then they are, not sensitive at all, and will listen for long periods of time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow Nicole, now you've made ME put Sonlight back on my list! LOL It was my first *love* that I never made the commitment to LOL Maybe next year...... :) :)

 

When I couldn't decide, I looked at samples on Amazon and some from my library, that made me decide to wait awhile because my kids weren't ready for some of them. I do like SL, but I like historical fiction a lot! Many find that tedious after awhile, or find the pace of SL to be too much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't really think any of it is that bad, but that's just my opinion; I was expecting a lot worse. The Nazi book (Twenty and Ten might be scary to some kids, because while there is nothing graphic, there are Jewish children in hiding and it's suspenseful and might be too much for younger kids. My dd is very sensitive, so I knew it was too much for her at the time and skipped it. The book about a homeless family, The Family Under the Bridge, I think is kind of sweet and fun, but it does touch on a serious subject. Nothing bad happens and the book doesn't go into the most of the realities of living on the streets. I actually felt I had to supplement our discussion a bit with how hard and dangerous that would really be. The Apple and the Arrow is about William Tell and it can be boring and hard to understand for some younger kids. Mary on Horseback is about the Frontier Nursing Service in the 1920, this one I skipped due to my sensitive dd and I haven't even read it myself yet, so can't tell you for sure, but I did hear there are some sad things- a baby or small child gets burned badly or dies if I'm remembering right. The Hundred Dresses involves a girl being picked on which some younger kids might not understand. Those are the only stories I would worry about, and if you do go with Core K, you can always pre-read them and decide if they're suitable, and if not you can put them aside and read them later. The couple that I skipped I substituted easily with books like Stuart Little and Pippi Longstocking. And there are a lot of other stories in the core, many gems. The Boxcar Children, The Wizard of Oz, Cappyboppy, James Herriots Treasury for Children, My Father's Dragon, and Dr.Dolittle were, and still are, all well loved here.

 

Overall, I love this core and it's one of my favorite SL cores- I've used P3/4, P4/5, K, 1, 3+4, 6, and 7. Sonlight is my favorite and the books are always great- since your dd likes being read to it might be a good fit. Although I do think a 6 year old will get more out of it than a 5 year old. Still, I was surprised when I got the core by how many of the books were short and had short chapters or had pictures, after all I had heard about it being advanced.

 

I agree with Nicole that it really is dependent on the child. My oldest did Core K when she was 5 and was fine with it. She could have done all of SL at grade level all the way through and been fine with it. My now 9yo would probably STILL be upset by several of the stories in core K. My 7yo has heard most of them, but I did skip several for the benefit of my 9yo, she isn't as sensitive as my 2nd dd, but she isn't like my oldest either. I am still doing Pre-K stories with my 6yo, but I think he is going to be like my oldest.

 

Now my 9yo is probably more like them than I want to admit. Though I do a good job of hiding it and playing tough guy I am really pretty sensitive. I cried as some point it almost all the SL RA's. I end up crying at almost every church service (and I go to a conservative, sit in your seat, proper Baptist church-not emotional). When I was little I can remember avoiding things that upset me, which included most fairy tales because they ended badly. I didn't get the point behind them I just was upset that someone died, and I think my 9yo is pretty much the same way.

 

There might be some spoilers here.

 

The Apple & the Arrow is very suspenseful, and while it doesn't really have any content beyond that my dd asked to stop reading it daily (I wasn't smart enough to at that time).

 

The Boxcar Children-The parents have died when the book opens. DD didn't mind this one so much.

 

Dolphin Treasure-The guy pushes his treasure hunting too far and almost dies as a result. Suspenseful, dd didn't like it.

 

Family Under the Bridge-Opens with the father having died and the family homeless. For most of the book they are homeless. Dd really didn't like this one.

 

The Hundred Dresses-One of my all time favorites, but deals with extreme teasing due to race and being poor. So extreme the family moves away. The mother has died in the story, but it starts out that way. The meaning behind this story will move most adults, but looking at it from the literal child I was I would have just seen a bunch of cruelty that they got away with and I would not have liked it (I would have missed the impact of the ending).

 

The Light at Tern Rock- Again it doesn't end with the ideal, so I would have hated it as a child.

 

Mary on Horseback is one that replaced an OOP book since I used Core K. I was told it has scenes where a child catches fire, and is left scared. Also that a mother dies in childbirth, and then the baby almost starves as the Father doesn't know how to feed it.

 

The Story of Dr. Doolittle-back to the literal child. I hated this story as a child, didn't get it at all, and my 9yo is the same.

 

Twenty and Ten-this is the Nazi title. Nothing really bad happens it is all the threatening of bad. They threaten the childrens lives, the nun's life and also threatens physical abuse. I softened the language when I read it to my oldest, but didn't even attempt it with my 9yo. The story ends well though, it is just the suspense in between that would get her.

 

Wizard of Oz-This again was too weird for me as a child. I didn't get any of the symbolism, and it just seemed so unfair at every turn. My 9yo doesn't like it either.

 

 

As an adult I now appreciated most of the stories. I think Dr. Doolittle and Family Under the Bridge were the two I still could take or leave. I explained the connections to my oldest and she appreciated them and loves all the stories. While I did explain them to my literal child as well it went over her head entirely. I just know she still isn't seeing it. She probably will in a year or so when logic level thinking begins to dawn.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Heather

 

 

 

This is wonderful information! I really appreciate it. But I am wondering. If Sonlight K = Kindergarten, why would anyone do it for first grade?...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I voted MFW K because it is a well rounded, biblical based program. The TM is open and go, it tells you exactly how to implement it, and everything you need (maniulatives) for the program is included in the package. So you don't have to spend extra time/money on making it 100%.

 

I don't think you would be happy with MFW K. I disagree that it is open and go. I have heard that FIAR is put together better. When I used it I was frustrated that I had to track down my own books and encyclopedia entries. (Though I guess you can skip that part, but the TM will say "read about the sun from a children's encyclopedia".)

 

I was unhappy with the lack of forward momentum with MFWK. I felt like DD had already done most of the program before we got it. What I plan to do with DS, and which I feel is the ideal choice for a 5 year old who is reading and has done some Math, is to buy MFW 1 and put it together with my MFW K TM, so that he is getting the phonics and math from MFW 1 and the science/bible from MFW K. Then for 6 years old I plan to use the other portion of MFW 1, and finish up the phonics and math if we took it slower than written.

 

I voted for GTG because we are loving our culture studies! DD begs to do it. And it does not integrate anything so you can get phonics and math on her level without overkill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sonlight K does not = Kindergarten!!! It is recommended for Grades K, 1, and 2. DD is just getting ready for some of the readalouds at 6 and a half. Sonlight Core #s do not equal grades. They changed K to Core C for a while to emphasize that. Most people recommend that you use a core with a child in the upper age range (which for K would be 7). It is not all about reading level. My DD was reading pretty much everything at 4 years old, but SL K did not work for us when she was 5 or newly 6. In our Beautiful Feet guide a couple of the read alouds show up for 4th grade!

Edited by Lovedtodeath
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just wanted to point out on the LA side that WP does a very good job getting through ALL phonics in K. It is very advanced. Perfect for an advanced reader, and the K LA goes along with Animal Worlds very nicely.

 

With WP I am excited about Ready to Learn. This is my choice for the "core" part of preK for DS, (4.5-5.5 years).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sonlight K does not = Kindergarten!!! It is recommended for Grades K, 1, and 2. DD is just getting ready for some of the readalouds at 6 and a half. Sonlight Core #s do not equal grades. They changed K to Core C for a while to emphasize that. Most people recommend that you use a core with a child in the upper age range (which for K would be 7). It is not all about reading level. My DD was reading pretty much everything at 4 years old, but SL K did not work for us when she was 5 or newly 6. In our Beautiful Feet guide a couple of the read alouds show up for 4th grade!

 

 

Thank you. I wonder why they don't just change it from K to something else if it does not = Kindergarten!?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. I wonder why they don't just change it from K to something else if it does not = Kindergarten!?

 

They changed it to C for a while, but I think too many people were confused by it since it was K for so long, especially since SL has a lot of used curriculum sales, so they switched it back.

Edited by Lovedtodeath
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have narrowed it down, everyone! You have said some wonderful things about every curriculum but I have forced myself to narrow it down. Next fall we will officially start K so I think we will do Sonlight K then. For now, I am trying to decide between MFW K and Galloping the Globe. My dd is ahead in reading and does not need the phonics instruction but it seems like many people say MFW K is great for character development and teaching the Bible. Any suggestions at this point?... Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have narrowed it down, everyone! You have said some wonderful things about every curriculum but I have forced myself to narrow it down. Next fall we will officially start K so I think we will do Sonlight K then. For now, I am trying to decide between MFW K and Galloping the Globe. My dd is ahead in reading and does not need the phonics instruction but it seems like many people say MFW K is great for character development and teaching the Bible. Any suggestions at this point?... Thanks!

 

Sounds like a great choice, GtG is light and fun, and I've heard great things about MFW K. If you do use MFW, I'd love to hear how it goes. My little guy will start K next fall and is already reading well, but I want his K year to be special, fun, and with no pressure. I don't think I want to use MFW since I'd have to cut so much out, but am intrigued by the other elements and would love to hear from a mom who uses it in a similar situation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Others have commented that they have used MFW K with a dc that was already reading. I think that it could work for you Jessie. I just know from your posts and from my attitude for K that I was not happy with MFW when I first got it and looked at it, and I am afraid that you would have the same feelings I did. I skipped about half the program and was not happy.

 

It is great for reinforcing phonics, for handwriting and beginning spelling, and the other elements (scripture memorization tied in to hands on worked well for us) and it has worked for some that way. Looking back I think if I had stuck it out that it would have worked fine. It is also easy to use the same setup for phonics as in the TM and just add more rules to it as you progress. So if you can discipline yourself to stick with it then it can definitely work.

 

I would go with WP or MFW 1 for LA to finish out your phonics after that. Most people that I know of who used SL LA for beginning reading mention that they were not happy with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Others have commented that they have used MFW K with a dc that was already reading. I think that it could work for you Jessie. I just know from your posts and from my attitude for K that I was not happy with MFW when I first got it and looked at it, and I am afraid that you would have the same feelings I did. I skipped about half the program and was not happy.

 

It is great for reinforcing phonics, for handwriting and beginning spelling, and the other elements (scripture memorization tied in to hands on worked well for us) and it has worked for some that way. Looking back I think if I had stuck it out that it would have worked fine. It is also easy to use the same setup for phonics as in the TM and just add more rules to it as you progress. So if you can discipline yourself to stick with it then it can definitely work.

 

I would go with WP or MFW 1 for LA to finish out your phonics after that. Most people that I know of who used SL LA for beginning reading mention that they were not happy with it.

 

Thanks - it's good to hear from another mom who has been in a similar situation....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is wonderful information! I really appreciate it. But I am wondering. If Sonlight K = Kindergarten, why would anyone do it for first grade?...

 

Oh my that is dangerous ground! It is like talking about grade level on SL. :lol::lol::lol:

 

I accidentally forgot and made a round of polls over there grade level instead of age, and did I hear about it!! I even heard about it when I made polls this time and did it right (I was congratulated n getting it right :D ). Well core names is another hot topic.

 

Here is my theory, but I have no proof, so it is all just conjuncture, but here it is anyway.

 

For every person who is online there is probalby 3 that just buy the products out of a catalog and use it. That means they buy grade levels because they don't know to think any other way.

 

Obviously if I (as an adult) can enjoy a pre-K or K book it is great literature, and will work for a range of grades. Core K is no exception. Good literature is just good, plus there are a variety of maturity issues with each child, so you really should choose based what your child is ready for. I actually bought Core K for my dd when she was 4.5, luckily I was about 8 months pg and was too tired and grouchy to pull off hs, because it would have been a disaster. I actually didn't get back to it for a year and then everything was a perfect fit. Back then SL didn't have a pre-K program, so I just bought the first level they did have.

 

Anyway long story short the forum users have wanted the core names changed for years. It is almost a yearly conversation and something that is repeated as a mantra on the choosing forum.

 

Now for my conjuncture. I think because of the sales from non-online people that the owners are very content to leave it as grade level. It is easy and clear cut (and I know a gal a church who uses SL is never online and sees it this way). The last time a thread on the issue came up two alternatives were posted. I suggested going to something that sounded fun and sold the program: For K try Touches of culture and History. For Core 1 try Traveling Egypt, Greece and Rome. A lot of people liked that idea. Another idea was floated to use letters instead. Well next thing I knew John himself (if I remember right) made a poll, but the only two options were keeping core designations or using letter designations. Nothing about using descriptive names and listing a ranges of ages that can use the program. Long story story that is how the lower cores became letter names for a year, it flopped and now they are back to Core names. :001_smile:

 

I can't really blame them, in the end. I would prefer descriptions that sold the program (WP's Adventures in the Sky and Sea makes you want to do it just by the title!), but I also get that it would be a pain to always be trying to explain to customers who aren't online what level to use. Then there are those who just wouldn't bother to call, but would use something more clear cut-that is what I think really keeps things the way they are, so Core K continues to be called Core K.

 

Make sense?

 

Heather

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Then there are those who just wouldn't bother to call, but would use something more clear cut-that is what I think really keeps things the way they are, so Core K continues to be called Core K.

 

Make sense?

 

Heather

 

But there is still the problem of calling it Core K if it is more suited for the older age range. IMO all of the cores should be one level higher... but then that would mess people up really bad who are trying to buy/sell used.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest sarathan

Hmmm...I'm having a hard time voting! I think Sonlight books are top notch, but I think Core K is a bit much for a 5 year old. What about Sonlight P4/5 with Singapore math and one of their LA programs(or a a different LA)?

 

I wouldn't do MFW K is your dd is an emerging reader.... MFW K teaches letter sounds and beginning cvc words which she already knows, right? I also wouldn't do MFW 1st with a 5 year old... too much writing, although the phonics is probably right on her level.

 

You could do GTG with Singapore math and I would add a separate LA program if it were me. That would make for a fun Kindergarten year. :)

 

I have no experience with HOD or WP. Little Hearts for His Glory is probably more appropiate for Kindergarten than Beyond and even then it looks best for 1st grade and not K.

 

Good luck deciding! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no experience with HOD or WP. Little Hearts for His Glory is probably more appropiate for Kindergarten than Beyond and even then it looks best for 1st grade and not K.

 

:iagree:My DDs reading level kept going up with NO school for 9 months. You should always err on the side of too easy. Picture books and projects will be way fun on the too easy side. Books that are too long or arduous with projects that are too complicated will ruin everything. You won't ruin anything by going too easy. I promise!

 

Remember I was the one who kept comparing my DD to 2nd graders when she had just turned 6. Well... she was reading at 3 so she should be at 2nd grade level right? NONONO she is just now at 1st grade level (six and a half) for schoolwork even though her reading level is way up there... (okay, 2nd grade level for spelling, but not anything else.) You need to consider your DD a K'er until she is at least 5 and a half or 6.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...