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I need a program that has spelling, vocab and possibly grammar all in one.


kjdkek
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Is there a program out there that includes all of this in one. We currently use a seperate spelling, vocabulary, grammar and writing program. Is there anywhere I can cut corners, so to say, by combining things with another program. This would be for a 7th grader and 5th grader. We seem to not have enough time in the day to get everything done.

 

Thanks, Erin

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I would look at Christian Light Education (if you want traditional) or Learning Language Arts Through Literature (if you want literature-based).

 

CLE really streamlines our day, since everything is in there, right in one book. The instructions are excellent, and sentence diagramming IS taught, in case you were wondering. There are some reviews of CLE here:http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/reviews/curriculum/reviews.aspx?id=59

 

and there is also a Yahoo group with samples and active users.

 

HTH!

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I would look at Christian Light Education (if you want traditional) or Learning Language Arts Through Literature (if you want literature-based).

 

CLE really streamlines our day, since everything is in there, right in one book. The instructions are excellent, and sentence diagramming IS taught, in case you were wondering. There are some reviews of CLE here:http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/reviews/curriculum/reviews.aspx?id=59

 

and there is also a Yahoo group with samples and active users.

 

HTH!

 

:iagree:These are the same two that I was going to suggest.

Mandy

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A friend of mine just turned me on to this because, like you, I was having trouble fitting it all in. I LOVE what I've researched so far and I even downloaded the first month for free off their website.

 

Check it out at: http://www.tfths.com/cqla.php. Call them and talk to the rep in person to see about placement levels.

 

Here's a review: http://www.thehomeschoolmagazine.com/Homeschool_Reviews/1502.php

 

I'm sure you can search this forum for other reviews as well. Good luck!

 

--Mari

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Laura,

 

I had looked at this and was wondering if there were many differences, other than some spelling, between US written English and UK's written English rules (you have to excuse my ignorance here)? Another words would a US student have trouble later after having used this?

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Laura,

 

I had looked at this and was wondering if there were many differences, other than some spelling, between US written English and UK's written English rules (you have to excuse my ignorance here)? Another words would a US student have trouble later after having used this?

 

The main one is the use of commas:

 

US: "I bought tomatoes, peaches, and pears."

UK: "I bought tomatoes, peaches and pears." (comma optional and not commonly used before 'and')

 

Most abbreviations in the UK have lost their full stop (period), for example 'Mr', Mrs'.

 

You'll have to help me with this one, but I think there's also a small difference in punctuating speech, in one specific case:

 

UK: How could he have been ignorant of the "Biggest Ponzi scheme yet discovered"?

 

I think the US puts that question mark inside the speech marks, but I might be wrong.

 

In general, the UK seems to use less punctuation than does the US: the trend is to use as much as is necessary for sense, rather than following stricter rules.

 

UK: Jane went to the shops but Susan went swimming. (no commas because the meaning is clear without)

US: Jane went to the shops, but Susan went swimming. (commas to separate independent clauses with coordinating conjunction)

 

This Wikipedia article has more information, but much of it will not come up in the context we are discussing. I hope that helps.

 

Laura

Edited by Laura in China
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Nope, the question mark goes on the outside as you have here. If the entire sentence is in quotes it would go on the inside.

 

I was told that there was a US rule about always putting the end punctuation inside the speech marks, whether or not it made logical sense. I must have been misinformed.

 

Laura

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I was told that there was a US rule about always putting the end punctuation inside the speech marks, whether or not it made logical sense. I must have been misinformed.

 

Laura

 

I see Americans doing this all the time, but it is improper according to what I was taught. Personally, I find it a bit irritating, but that's my own problem of course.

 

This reminds me of a picture my brother recently sent me. It was a photograph of a bulletin board, with two signs tacked on to it. The first said:

 

Please "do not" use staples for posting.

 

The second, attached just below the first, read:

 

Please do not use quotation marks for emphasis.

 

:D

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This reminds me of a picture my brother recently sent me. It was a photograph of a bulletin board, with two signs tacked on to it. The first said:

 

Please "do not" use staples for posting.

 

The second, attached just below the first, read:

 

Please do not use quotation marks for emphasis.

 

:D

 

Laura

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The main one is the use of commas:

 

US: "I bought tomatoes, peaches, and pears."

UK: "I bought tomatoes, peaches and pears." (comma optional and not commonly used before 'and')

 

Laura

 

 

Just to split hairs further, I was taught to not use the comma before the conjunction in a list. That's about the only grammar lesson I remember or probably received during my US education.:tongue_smilie:

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There is a sample chapter from the first book (for your fifth grader) on this page. For your seventh grader, you would probably go with the second or third book.

 

Come back to me if you need information about how to get these books shipped.

 

Laura

 

I will second Laura's suggestion. We are using Book 2 with a 6th grader, but it could easily work for a 7th grader. It is comprehensive and time-efficient. No busy work yet quite challenging. We really enjoy it here!

 

Anita

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Just to split hairs further, I was taught to not use the comma before the conjunction in a list. That's about the only grammar lesson I remember or probably received during my US education.:tongue_smilie:

OK, I am now thoroughly confused. I learned both ways in the 8 or so different schools I attended during grade school. Maybe there is just no truly correct way.

 

:001_huh:

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OK, I am now thoroughly confused. I learned both ways in the 8 or so different schools I attended during grade school. Maybe there is just no truly correct way.

 

:001_huh:

 

 

I was actually taught that the comma before the conjunction is optional. It is not necessary but not wrong either. Personally, I do not use it but I know many others that do. I am a Medical Transcriptionist and even among all of the Doctors, the grammar overall is poor.

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CW Aesop covers writing, grammar, and spelling - though the spelling is more up to you (you select words from the selections, and practice them on an independent spelling list).

 

Actually if you buy the Instructor Guides, they do choose out works for you...if you want to use them.

 

Both kids could probably start with the Older Beginners set which moves more quickly through Aesop and into Homer.

 

Heather

 

 

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I need a program that has spelling, vocab and possibly grammar all in one.

 

Aren't spelling & vocab basically two sides of the same coin? Shouldn't the child be understanding the words he spells, and spelling the new words? I think you can combine those 2 by just dropping one and using the other for both subjects.

 

As for the Brit/American grammar differences, I think there are as many differences within America as there are between Amer. & other English users! So many rules are different in different books etc. The main rule to stick with: Be consistent!

 

I would worry a bit more about Brit/American spelling differences, although it won't be a big deal at all to some kids.

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Aren't spelling & vocab basically two sides of the same coin? Shouldn't the child be understanding the words he spells, and spelling the new words?

Yes and no.

 

Spelling generally focuses on the mechanics: spelling rules, syllabication rules, dictionary usage, etc. Spelling also generally groups word lists according to spelling concepts. Vocabulary focuses on the meanings of the words and their usage; children would learn to spell them, but the spelling rules and whatnot would be more random, KWIM?

 

Most publishers don't do spelling after 6th grade or thereabouts; most publishers start vocabulary after that.

 

I would probably not do both in any case.

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I would probably not do both in any case.

 

Me, either.

 

We've always discussed the meaning of spelling words, and discussed the spelling of vocabulary words. I guess it was never in a workbook, but I couldn't see doing them separately. I'd do one, and add the other informally if you see a need.

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Me, either.

 

We've always discussed the meaning of spelling words, and discussed the spelling of vocabulary words. I guess it was never in a workbook, but I couldn't see doing them separately. I'd do one, and add the other informally if you see a need.

 

Your dc are probably natural spellers :-)

 

Some children really do need focussed, specific spelling instruction.

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Your dc are probably natural spellers :-)

 

Some children really do need focussed, specific spelling instruction.

 

Could be true. Very different children, with very different approaches to spelling, but no real problem spellers. Interesting how we're all created differently :o)

 

However, I do tutor some kids whose challenge in life is spelling. And I have found that I should stop to make sure they know what each word means, or they will memorize & forget.

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