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AoPS Online Classes options?


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Hello all!

My 12 yr old daughter has been thriving with AoPS. This past year she had a tutor who went through the Introduction to Geometry text with her and she did fantastic. Unfortunately, the tutor cannot continue in the same capacity next year with Intermediate Algebra, but the AoPS books have begun to go beyond what I can teach independently *well*. I can go through the text with her, but I want someone who can answer her questions thoroughly and well and can help her excel.

That brings me to my search for online classes for Intermediate Algebra and beyond using the AoPS books. I know there is the AoPS Virtual Academy and regular online classes. Are there any other online learning places that offer these classes? Right now, my ideal is the AoPS Virtual Academy for structure purposes (actual interactive class instead of just the text-based classroom), but I am wincing at the price tag for just a single class.

Are there any other options out there?

 

x-posting with the  k-8 curriculum board

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Posted (edited)

https://www.wtmacademy.com/course/algebra-ii-aops/

This covers some of the intro to algebra book and some of the intermediate algebra book.

 

Another option is https://www.rfwp.com/online-learning/courses/algebra-ii-2024-25/, which at $1050 for both semesters is still a lot cheaper than AoPS Virtual Campus and would be better for minimizing repetition 

Edited by Malam
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Dr. Heather Finotti used to teach with AoPS online but now teaches her own online, synchronous classes. She incorporates many AoPS aspects into her classes.  She was my DC's instructor for AoPS Online Geo. My DC took Single Variable Calc (equivalent to AP Calc BC) with Dr. F this year and loved it.

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Posted (edited)

A somewhat unpopular opinion and approach:

i haven’t been able to teach my kid since the first half of Intro to Algebra. They did the rest of that book at breakneck pace and Intro to Geometry at the pace of a snail. My role was to sit next to them when they were confused and read the book aloud, make them work the problems that did the teaching, make them slow down. The books do teach to the kid.

 My lack of help means my kid did need to struggle through. But they learned very deep and understood very well. I think they ultimately understood the material far better than kids who were coached. 
 

If a kid is ready to self-teach and/or is interested enough in the subject, that’s what AOPS is meant for. They shouldn’t need a teacher/tutor.

Edited by Jackie
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On 6/9/2024 at 7:15 AM, Jackie said:

If a kid is ready to self-teach and/or is interested enough in the subject, that’s what AOPS is meant for. They shouldn’t need a teacher/tutor.

I agree that AOPS is so great for this and it worked so wonderfully for my first two math-gifted DS's.  There's a real lack in the market though for students who can do AOPS caliber interesting problems but don't learn well from the way that the AOPS text teaches.   I would assume this is the issue of why people end up using AOPS books the "wrong" way or seek out classes that teach the material in a direct manner.  My dyslexic youngest struggles to comprehend the wordy AOPS text when I read it to him, but is incredibly bored with standard textbook problems.  Once he understands, somehow, (because I teach it to him or he watches a video) what the text is trying to convey he can make amazing intuitive leaps to solve the harder problems.  We are half-way through intro to Algebra and the whole thing is driving me crazy, but on the other hand, I can't find anything else he won't be bored by...so.. "wrong" use of AOPS it may be.

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On 6/9/2024 at 8:15 AM, Jackie said:

A somewhat unpopular opinion and approach:

i haven’t been able to teach my kid since the first half of Intro to Algebra. They did the rest of that book at breakneck pace and Intro to Geometry at the pace of a snail. My role was to sit next to them when they were confused and read the book aloud, make them work the problems that did the teaching, make them slow down. The books do teach to the kid.

 My lack of help means my kid did need to struggle through. But they learned very deep and understood very well. I think they ultimately understood the material far better than kids who were coached. 
 

If a kid is ready to self-teach and/or is interested enough in the subject, that’s what AOPS is meant for. They shouldn’t need a teacher/tutor.

We did use this approach through intro to algebra and Intro to c&p. It's more that I want her to have someone to bounce questions off of. The geometry work she did was mostly structured as working through intros together and then working on exercises and challenge problems independently. Sometimes she has questions, though, about why a method doesn't work, etc and I don't always confidently know the answer unless the text spells it out 😂 but I do get what you're saying!

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On 6/9/2024 at 5:15 AM, Jackie said:

If a kid is ready to self-teach and/or is interested enough in the subject, that’s what AOPS is meant for. They shouldn’t need a teacher/tutor.

 

11 hours ago, kirstenhill said:

My dyslexic youngest struggles to comprehend the wordy AOPS text when I read it to him....  Once he understands, somehow, (because I teach it to him or he watches a video) what the text is trying to convey he can make amazing intuitive leaps to solve the harder problems.   "wrong" use of AOPS it may be.

I don't want anyone reading this thread to think that it is wrong for a teacher to teach AoPS using the textbooks.  I would argue that it's a rare kid, even in high school, who can self-study from a textbook without any assistance from a teacher or parent.   Many do have this ability--and I've read about them on these boards--but I suspect most can not.  

My kids aren't dyslexic, or have other LDs, but I did exactly for them as @kirstenhill describes.  No way could my dds complete AoPS on their own, but they did fine when I did the teaching.  I tutor a lot of student now who are taking AoPS online classes or studying textbooks independently, and for them AoPS is almost perfect.  They just need some instruction and scaffolding and they can fully benefit from the program. 

 

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On 6/10/2024 at 3:07 PM, JessBurs said:

We did use this approach through intro to algebra and Intro to c&p. It's more that I want her to have someone to bounce questions off of. The geometry work she did was mostly structured as working through intros together and then working on exercises and challenge problems independently. Sometimes she has questions, though, about why a method doesn't work, etc and I don't always confidently know the answer unless the text spells it out 😂 but I do get what you're saying!

I just wanted to point out that the AOPS forum is a fantastic resource for things like this!   In fact, AOPS makes it VERY easy for kids who are self-teaching to get these kinds of answers/information.   If you are using the online textbooks, for example, they even have little links next to the problems where you can discuss it and ask questions online.   Same thing with alcumus.   The forum is also one of the safest places online for kids IMHO.  It is heavily moderated, and a great introduction to searching for information using the internet.   (My kids were pretty tech sheltered prior to the their time on the AOPS website.). 

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And AOPS students LOVE responding with help very quickly.   (I know that it can be frustrating waiting for help with a math problem, so I like to point this out.).  There seems to be some friendly competition on the forum over who can write the better solutions....the students are also very good about giving hints without giving away the solution.   

When my students were very young, they needed some help at first posting questions on the forum.   I would help them type it out and sort of model how to ask mores specific questions that led to better answers.   We couldn't afford to hire a math teacher, and I was SO grateful for this wonderful free support.   

Edited by TheAttachedMama
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My kid did the texts on her own through calculus, with the exception of doing the text-based class for intermediate algebra. That was useful for feedback on proofs, but she's always been able to teach herself the material. Occasionally she gets stuck, which usually ends up with her talking through what she's done, me saying "mm hmm" or asking a dumb question, then she figures it out herself by explaining it. I did sign her up for an online multivariable calc class in the fall though, thinking that some human interaction might be helpful or interesting at some point.

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