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My dd3 is HIGHLY interested in school. I am really more bent towards waiting on the academics and keeping the preschool years free for storytime/playing in mud/and the like :001_smile:, but then dd keeps testing my opinion on this.

 

What would you recommend for a 3yo (she'll be 4 in March) who is jealous of her brother's Singapore 1A Math, is counting well through 10, has good fm skills, loves the $store workbooks, etc......

 

Is she too young for EarlyBird Math? I didn't do this with ds so I don't have the book to look at.

 

What is the difference between the US edition and Standards edition Earlybird? I saw that the Standards edition has cut and paste activites (plus for dd3), but I want to stick with the US edition for 1-6th grades. Is it a big deal to do the Standard Earlybird, and switch to US edition for 1A?

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My dd3 is HIGHLY interested in school. I am really more bent towards waiting on the academics and keeping the preschool years free for storytime/playing in mud/and the like :001_smile:, but then dd keeps testing my opinion on this.
We did a Charlotte Mason-lite approach with my eldest: readings, nature walks, and informal (stealth) narration. Ambleside Online provided our outline. I do this with my younger as well, but like your DD, she want to feel like she's doing "her school."

 

Is she too young for EarlyBird Math? I didn't do this with ds so I don't have the book to look at.
It should be fine. As for other workbooks, my youngest likes to do connect the dots while her older sister is doing school. She also likes tangrams; I find a magnetic set to be ideal for this age. One book I'd recommend is Family Math for Young Children.

 

Is it a big deal to do the Standard Earlybird, and switch to US edition for 1A?
I prefer the Standards Earlybird. While it is more expensive, it is entirely in colour and has more activities. There would be no problem switching from Standards Earlybird to US Edition Primary Math.
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Sylvia is the exact same age and she's been zipping through the Hooked on Phonics big K workbook and several other K-level workbooks we had remaining from Becca at that age. She works independently and totally at will. I help her out with a few things when she asks, but when she's done, she's done. She also loves the Kumon Pasting and Jigsaw Puzzle books - she's a big fan of cut and paste too.

 

I can't help you with the Singapore Earlybird books - I saw that they had cut/paste activities too and was toying with the idea of getting them for Sylvie. She will occasionally pipe in with an answer while I'm working with Becca on her Singapore though - I think she "gets" spatial things and patterns more quickly than Becca.

 

So I'm keeping an eye out here for ideas too! :bigear:

 

Oh, I should add that her "2 days of preschool" is total play - what academics they teach there, she already knows.

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I am starting tot school with dd after we are done our xmas break, she is 15 months. Now the only reason I am starting with her is a) she WANTS to sit at a desk and do activities like the big kids, b) she is very verbal already and follows directions well and c) I was already having activities to keep her busy so now I am jsut tweaking them to be more educational. I plan to use my daycare experience to plan thematic units to center activities around, utilise slow and steady get me ready and just have fun in a structured manner.

 

I would introduce her to what she wants, but stop as soon as she gets bored/tired of it and don'tworry about it. At this point it is all about simply introducing basic concepts and showing that learning is fun.

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I really cannot say enough about the Kumon products. Everything we have purchased from them has been a big hit.

 

 

I've gotten her some Kumon books - she LOVES them too!:D

 

I did tons of them with ds to help with his fm skills (he is still doing some;)). They are wonderful, esp the tracing/coloring/mazes.

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Last year when Toby was 3 and Bailey was doing K, he really wanted to do workbooks and "school" stuff as well. So I got the ETC primer series for him (Get Ready, Get Set and Go for the Code a, b and c) and Get Set for School (Handwriting without Tears). I also saw a cute Richard Scarry book at Amazon called Getting Ready for School that I might buy for Ben if he is interested in doing books next year. I haven't tried Kumon workbooks but they look really neat.

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I can say of all the random stuff I have purchased, there are 3 things that were definitely worth their money 1) Saxon Math K with the manipulatives, 2) ETC primer series, and 3) Kumon upper and lower case letter cards that you can wipe off to practice writing. Everything else has really been fluff.

 

 

Last year when Toby was 3 and Bailey was doing K, he really wanted to do workbooks and "school" stuff as well. So I got the ETC primer series for him (Get Ready, Get Set and Go for the Code a, b and c) and Get Set for School (Handwriting without Tears). I also saw a cute Richard Scarry book at Amazon called Getting Ready for School that I might buy for Ben if he is interested in doing books next year. I haven't tried Kumon workbooks but they look really neat.
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Your child is at an age where it's so easy to reproduce sounds and memorize things, and she would probably have a much better chance of speaking like a native if she starts learning another language now. If you can find a good 3 hour per week preschool language immersion class, that would be great. Tapes are helpful as well, but not as the only source of information.

 

I hope you're reading to her a lot--she can develop an amazing vocabulary that way.

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When dd5 was 3 1/2 we started the EB series (US edition), and they were a huge success. I did much of the writing for her until around her 4th birthday. She started ETC book 1 (we skipped the primers) a few months before she turned 4, although we skipped some of the writing activities. I had also planned on holding off on formal academics, but she asked for them and I let her take the lead. We usually worked on workbook activities for about 15 minutes at a time, three or four days a week, always at her request. A big hit at that age here was Starfall, which my nearly 3 1/2 year old ds is now enjoying as well. He will be starting EB and the ETC primers this spring, as well as joining in on Latin. I think there is such a thing as "too early," but only if you place expectations on them instead of allowing them to go at their own pace. Although we did use "academic materials" at age 3, my memories are more of storytime at the library, Kindermusik, and creative movement classes, and I think that if we had held off, things would still have turned out just fine.

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I can say of all the random stuff I have purchased, there are 3 things that were definitely worth their money 1) Saxon Math K with the manipulatives, 2) ETC primer series, and 3) Kumon upper and lower case letter cards that you can wipe off to practice writing. Everything else has really been fluff.

 

Tried (with ds5) and didn't like #1 and #2 :tongue_smilie:, and we are starting with cursive first and finding cursive stuff like that for her age is :glare:. I have lap-size chalkboards with those lines for penmanship on them and she likes to use those.

 

Your child is at an age where it's so easy to reproduce sounds and memorize things, and she would probably have a much better chance of speaking like a native if she starts learning another language now. If you can find a good 3 hour per week preschool language immersion class, that would be great. Tapes are helpful as well, but not as the only source of information.

 

I hope you're reading to her a lot--she can develop an amazing vocabulary that way.

 

He g'ma is Korean...I wish we lived closer! I would like to get all 3 of my dc into learning Korean.

 

We read tons! :001_smile:

 

 

When dd5 was 3 1/2 we started the EB series (US edition), and they were a huge success. I did much of the writing for her until around her 4th birthday. She started ETC book 1 (we skipped the primers) a few months before she turned 4, although we skipped some of the writing activities. I had also planned on holding off on formal academics, but she asked for them and I let her take the lead. We usually worked on workbook activities for about 15 minutes at a time, three or four days a week, always at her request. A big hit at that age here was Starfall, which my nearly 3 1/2 year old ds is now enjoying as well. He will be starting EB and the ETC primers this spring, as well as joining in on Latin. I think there is such a thing as "too early," but only if you place expectations on them instead of allowing them to go at their own pace. Although we did use "academic materials" at age 3, my memories are more of storytime at the library, Kindermusik, and creative movement classes, and I think that if we had held off, things would still have turned out just fine.

 

 

I heartily agree with the statement in bold.:iagree:

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My dd3 is HIGHLY interested in school. I am really more bent towards waiting on the academics and keeping the preschool years free for storytime/playing in mud/and the like :001_smile:, but then dd keeps testing my opinion on this.

 

What would you recommend for a 3yo (she'll be 4 in March) who is jealous of her brother's Singapore 1A Math, is counting well through 10, has good fm skills, loves the $store workbooks, etc......

 

Is she too young for EarlyBird Math? I didn't do this with ds so I don't have the book to look at.

 

What is the difference between the US edition and Standards edition Earlybird? I saw that the Standards edition has cut and paste activites (plus for dd3), but I want to stick with the US edition for 1-6th grades. Is it a big deal to do the Standard Earlybird, and switch to US edition for 1A?

Really and truly, your dd isn't interested in *school.* She wants to be included in the things her older brother is doing. I'd be more inclined to give her things like preschool-size Cuinsenaire rods, or age-appropriate puzzles, or some Montessori-type activities, and not anything that looks like "school."

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My dd3 is HIGHLY interested in school.

 

My first thought is that your dd is highly interested in getting the time and attention she sees your other child getting. Not that you aren't giving her enough, but that she wants what her sibling has. My kids are like that, too.

 

Were I you, I would set aside some time each day that is "dd3's time." Play some games with her, read some books, do a fingerplay, and tell her "This is how three year olds do school." I would not accommodate her desire to do what her sibling is doing unless you are certain it is developmentally appropriate for her.

 

I regularly remind my son that "Your sister is in first grade. You are in Kindergarten. You will not always be doing the same things."

 

Tara

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I agree with everything Tara said.:iagree:

 

Here's what I did. When my youngest felt left out (at 3 1/2 and 4), I tried just spending time with her and that didn't fly. So, then I bought her a couple of A Beka's nursery books and did BFIAR with her. I arranged the schedule where I would alternate between kids. I would work with big sis on a subject, and then do something with little sis. So, for example, I would teach the Math lesson, Big sis would work on the worksheet, and little sis and I would play a game. If Big sis had a question, she could interrupt. If she finished faster than us, she would do some independent reading. Little sis and I played games, did art, once in a while did a Button Bear worksheet, read books and sometimes she just told me what she had been doing (what the ponies were doing in pony castle with the Littlest Pet shop animals) :001_smile:.

 

Another thing I did was, I wouldn't let big sis interrupt BFIAR time. That way Little sis felt as "important" as big sis. LOL!!! Last year made me realize having only two kids can be a blessing! This year is a lot smoother believe it or not, and I'm sooo glad I waited to do "formal school". I really miss those little moments and the stories about the Littlest Pet shop and the Ponies:001_wub:

 

OH, and BTW we have Singapore's Earlybird Math, and I think it's perfect for Kindergarten, but not for preK. :001_smile:

 

Blessings!

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My belief is that if they are ready and interested, go for it. Looking back now, I'm AMAZED at what my 3 year old knew. I'm not boasting, because she was interested and motivated. She could read, she knew many of her addition facts, she knew where lots of countries were on the map and most states. It really made teaching her later a breeze because she could read so well. But, I made sure there was lots of time for playing and reading out loud also. If she isn't interested, I wouldn't push it.

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ETC primer series for him (Get Ready, Get Set and Go for the Code a, b and c) and Get Set for School (Handwriting without Tears).

 

We started HS my daughter when she was 3 (her brothers were 10 &12). She wanted her own books. So I bought her the MUS Primer workbook along with the books mentioned above.

 

She was happy!! One thing I did with the workbooks was to put the pages in sheet protectors and use a grease pencil. This way we could reuse the workbooks again when her FM skills were a little stronger.

 

HTH

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Really and truly, your dd isn't interested in *school.* She wants to be included in the things her older brother is doing. I'd be more inclined to give her things like preschool-size Cuinsenaire rods, or age-appropriate puzzles, or some Montessori-type activities, and not anything that looks like "school."

 

You are spot on that she wants "mommy-time" and "school-time", and I do encourage her to just free play with math manipulatives and puzzles. She has mastered (and is bored with) every puzzle we own.....I have read several Montessori books, and agree with the basic philosophy. However, this is the same child who went through the "I can write, and so I will....on every surface in the house (:glare::lol:) stage," and learned her letter sounds by osmosis at 2yo. I would not have even thought about starting "school" with her but for the fact that I caught her forming some bad habits (esp letter formation). What we do is very "Montessori-ish" as far as that goes.

 

 

 

My belief is that if they are ready and interested, go for it. Looking back now, I'm AMAZED at what my 3 year old knew. I'm not boasting, because she was interested and motivated. She could read, she knew many of her addition facts, she knew where lots of countries were on the map and most states. It really made teaching her later a breeze because she could read so well. But, I made sure there was lots of time for playing and reading out loud also. If she isn't interested, I wouldn't push it.

 

Thanks for sharing! I won't push her, and in fact it puts a wrench in my HS plan to start her early:tongue_smilie:.

 

Tara-She won't buy the "this is how 3yo's do school" line:001_rolleyes:. She will just tell me she is 6 and will not drop the subject until she is properly *schooled*! (Ask me how I know???:lol:) I think she will be content to stay out of ds5's lessons if hers look comparable kwim. That's why I was thinking EB.

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Tara-She won't buy the "this is how 3yo's do school" line:001_rolleyes:. She will just tell me she is 6 and will not drop the subject until she is properly *schooled*! (Ask me how I know???:lol:)

 

I understand you, as I also have a very persistent child. However, if you give in to her because she's persistent, I think you run the risk of giving her the idea that she controls her schooling, which may not be something you want to deal with when she is older. ;)

 

Tara

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I understand you, as I also have a very persistent child. However, if you give in to her because she's persistent, I think you run the risk of giving her the idea that she controls her schooling, which may not be something you want to deal with when she is older. ;)

 

Tara

 

good point. :001_smile:

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