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Do high percentile scores mean anything other than telling what the student is ready to learn for math and finding reading material in that lexile range? 
 

In other words just an academic growth check?

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I assume you're talking about the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) test.

Do you have the RIT scores?  That can tell you more than the percentile rank if you have access to the norms tables.  What you're interested in is the percentile rank of the scores when compared to students in the higher grade.

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Here are the most recent norms.  The tables you need are in Appendix C.1, which starts on page 17.

The important number is your child's RIT score.  Look at the end of year tables for the appropriate subject.  Find the grade level where your child's RIT score falls between the 90th and the 94th percentiles.  Your child has likely mastered the material at that grade level.  

Here is an example.  Say your child's math RIT score 234.  On the spring table, a score of 234 corresponds to somewhere between the 93rd and the 94th percentiles in the 4th grade column.  Therefore, it is likely that your child has mastered 4th grade math and is ready to study 5th grade math.

You may notice that a 12th grade student at the 50th percentile also has a math spring RIT score of 234.  Because of this, any student who receives this score will also get a "grade equivalent" score of 12.9 (or thereabouts).  This does NOT mean that such a student is ready for calculus.  What it means is that students at the 50th percentile in math in the 12th grade have mastered 4th grade math.   

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 10/22/2022 at 5:55 PM, EKS said:

The important number is your child's RIT score.  Look at the end of year tables for the appropriate subject.  Find the grade level where your child's RIT score falls between the 90th and the 94th percentiles.  Your child has likely mastered the material at that grade level.  

I was not alerted to any replies on this thread, so I apologize for not realizing you answered. 
 

That chart is helpful 😀  thanks!

 The RIT scores for math and reading were 266 and 240 respectively. According to the chart that puts this “6th” grader having mastered 6th grade spring (so about grade level) in reading and spring 11th grade material in math. The math score doesn’t sound accurate. 
 

Looking at what they said he was “ready to learn” looks like mostly Algebra topics to me and that is where we are anyway. 

According to the “ready to learn” for reading, we have covered those literary terms, but not practiced finding and identifying them on his own. I looked over his shoulder last year and could see what he was missing. I didn’t do that this year. 

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6 hours ago, Kezia said:

he RIT scores for math and reading were 266 and 240 respectively. According to the chart that puts this “6th” grader having mastered 6th grade spring (so about grade level) in reading and spring 11th grade material in math. The math score doesn’t sound accurate. 

Looking at what they said he was “ready to learn” looks like mostly Algebra topics to me and that is where we are anyway. 

The MAP test gets less and less helpful when you start talking about accelerated kids who have taken (some) algebra and beyond.  It seems to work best for estimating mastery of kids who are working at elementary levels.  

I'd say that a kid who has not yet taken algebra who has a RIT score of 266 is likely to be ready for algebra and should do very well.  It sounds like you already knew that he might be ready for algebra (which is how tests like this should work--no surprises).   It's important to be aware though that actually being "ready" for algebra is about far more than knowing a certain body of material.  At least it is when kids are in school.  The executive function piece is huge.

I wouldn't base instruction on what NWEA says in its lists of what the student is "ready" for.

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