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Book a Week 2021 - BW38: September Equinox


Robin M
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Since the majority of our readers live in areas several hours ahead of me and I’m late to bed, late to rise on Sunday, I will post Saturday night before I go to bed.  

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Climb aboard our good ship Pumdeg Dau o Lyfrau and let us sail over the trees and seas and look upon the leaves for the September Equinox is upon us with Autumn in the Northern Hemisphere and Spring in the Southern Hemisphere.  Let's follow the breeze and celebrate the changing of the season and fall into reading with a book about the seasons, the changing of the guard, the passing of time. Maybe even get an early start on something spooky as October is coming up fast.  

The sights and sounds of autumn are my favorite time of year with the wind rustling through the branches, and the crunch and crackle of fallen leaves. All the shades of yellow and orange and purple and red form a colorful palette on which to play.  

"Is not this a true autumn day? Just the still melancholy that I love — that makes life and nature harmonize.  The birds are consulting about their migrations, the trees are putting on the hectic or the pallid hues of decay, and begin to strew the ground, that one's very footsteps may not disturb the repose of earth and air, while they give us a scent that is a perfect anodyne to the restless spirit. Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns. ~George Eliot, letter to Miss Lewis, 1st October 1841"

What is your favorite part of the season?

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Count of Monte Cristo

Chapter 88. The Insult
Chapter 89. The Night
Chapter 90. The Meeting

 

Link to week 37

 

Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as share your book reviews with other readers around the globe.

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Finished J.R. Robb's Forgotten in Death, another great entry in the In Death series. I kept thinking I know who did it, but nope that person wasn't it, then the one, but nope.  I was right there with Eve as she followed the clues and finally figured it out. 

Started Faith Hunter's True Dead and also dove into the middle of a new to me author and O'Halleran Security International series by T.J. Logan with # 3 Deadly Deception. (One of the freebies from a week or so ago)  Enjoyed it enough to get the kindle unlimited #1 Deadly Secret

We watched Ford vs Ferrari tonight which was quite good and recommend if you  want to know more about the beginnings of Carroll Shelby, his relationship with Ford, and racing. 

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For those in autumn, enjoy: it's my favourite season of the year.  It is lovely to be in spring time, though, and to see our trees budding and spring bulbs flowering; and, to get out in the sunshine to watch the lambs frolicking about in the paddocks.  

To books.   I'm sorting through my options of what to, try to,  read next and thinking I may start either Becoming Jane Austen ~ Jon Spence, or, The Girl from the Channel Islands ~ Jenny Lecoat.

Currently listening to these audiobooks and enjoying both of them:  Picture Miss Seeton: Bk1 ~ Heron Carvic,  narrated by Phyllida Nash (repeat, late night listen)  and  The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz ~ Erik Larson, narrated by Matt Addis.

 

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Happy Sunday everyone!

Thank you, Robin, for your continued posting and support of this group. I appreciate it.

I'm continuing my non-fic reading month and have four books going at the moment. It's a bit overwhelming and I need to focus on one at a time as three are deep (ish) books (at least for me).

Soldiers of Peace

Braving The Wilderness by Brene Brown

The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down by Haemin Sunim

All In: An Autobiography by Billie Jean King

 

Braving the Wilderness is probably the book I need to read right now. I think I have heard of Brene Brown here on WTM but I have never read any of her work. This popped up in my Libby app as a suggested title for me so I scooped it up. It probably was on there since I have been reading/listening to hiking books, traveling books, etc. Maybe. I don't really know.  I am halfway through chapter 1 and it seems this book was written for me. Is it good when a book gives you that tightness in your chest, quivering throat, and teary eyes halfway through chapter 1? When you realize that the sense of unbelonging you have felt your entire life was experienced by someone else? I've already had to put it down and walk away and ask myself if I should continue. Part of me is concerned about how I will respond when she begins explaining her path to belonging and how she managed to escape the suffering. These sentences..."not belonging in our families is still one of the most dangerous hurts. That's because it has the power to break our heart, our spirit, and our sense of self-worth..... and when those things break there are only three outcomes... 1) You live in constant pain and seek relief by numbing it and/or inflicting pain on others. 2) You deny your pain and your denial ensures that you pass it on to those around you and down to your children. 3) You find the courage to own the pain and develop a level of compassion and empathy for yourself and for others that allows you to spot hurt in the world in a very unique way."

I may need a counseling session if I continue reading. Have any of you had such a strong reaction to a book?  No, don't answer that question. Let me believe you have and that my reaction is normal.

Edited by Granny_Weatherwax
capitalization and punctuation
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Thank you for the great thread Robin!

My favorite part of fall is pumpkins.........I love the decorations and I may be trying to diet but I am still eating the occasional pumpkin donut. I am about to start a new quilt with a pumpkin theme because I need a few more pumpkin decorations!.😂

Last night I found myself hooked on Lady of the Ashes which I thought of as a possible disappointment yesterday. I am not done yet as it is around 400 pages but hope to finish today. It does not start well. Her marriage is not a good one with a extremely jealous husband because his wife is in demand at the funeral director career he trained her for. An interesting side note is Prince Albert’s death plays a front and center part of this book which has never interested me before......far more interesting than I would have guessed. According to some new research it was likely Crohn’s not Typhoid that caused his death at 42. It also looks at the American Cival War from the British perspective........something else I have not been overly interested in but seems to be pretty accurately portrayed. This book has me googling!

For my quilting pleasure I am listening to yet another Library Lover’s mystery. These are fun cozies where the nasty new character dies (in this installment stabbed with a steak knife in the library) and our librarian heroine is forced to investigate to save reputations. There is a cute dog. Very easy listening......... https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33801790-death-in-the-stacks

I also listened to Sparkling Cyanide this week. This book is my most hated of the Agatha Christie movies in any form so I actually thought about skipping it. I have not read if for years and doubt I really appreciated before thanks to the movie version. I really enjoyed it. It’s been long enough that I didn’t know all the answers and was actually a bit surprised by some of the ending.

I seem to be getting an early start on my Spooky October reading by starting the Jayne Ann Krentz Fogg Lake series. I really enjoyed the first book installment which is filled with physic auras and a super secret experiment. Covert agencies and a place where an explosion happened near Seattle that made a lake with a deathly fog and a population with extra abilities. Great fun! I seem to have discovered this trilogy at a great point as the third arrives in January. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/45301848-the-vanishing

 

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5 hours ago, Granny_Weatherwax said:

Braving the Wilderness is probably the book I need to read right now.

This does sound like an emotionally challenging read. Sending good thoughts if you decide to persevere.

Regards,

Kareni

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Some bookish posts From reddit:


"Bedtime story" for two adults

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/pknj64/bedtime_story_for_two_adults/

 

I'm looking for books about people who lived simple lives. Maybe with offbeat careers. People who chose not to partake in the rat race modern society has become.

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/pe1cmj/im_looking_for_books_about_people_who_lived/

 

Favourite Short Story Collections

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/pmm20l/favourite_short_story_collections/

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Reading everything by Dorothy Heydt which if you like fantasy or historical fiction set in classical times you will love. All her stories available for download at the site below; pay what you can using the paypal link. All of them written in the 80s or 90s, but some set in an imaginary future (which includes a pandemic in 2019 - duck flu!!)

Dorothy J. Heydt: Bibliography (kithrup.com)

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This week I read Mermaids of Bodega Bay by Mary Birk -- a murder mystery with a lot of false trails. I got it because Bodega Bay is a favorite Saturday drive from here, but it really doesn't have a very strong sense of place and I got frustrated with all the fake-outs on whodunit. So, nope, would not necessarily recommend.

Also read A Girl From the Channel Islands by Jenny Lecoat, a WWII story about the German occupation of these British islands. I enjoyed this one! A native islander ends up sheltering a refugee from Austria (who is jewish); the island feels real, and so do the wartime issues and ethical struggles of the characters. 

I have a couple more Joe Pickett books on tap, plus I need to finish The Engineer's Wife for this weekend.

Praying for rain and celebrating my son's 27th birthday. He returned from Alaska with some beautiful drone footage of his hikes and the glacier he explored.

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I finished two books since I last posted -

The Empty Throne - part of The Last Kingdom series by Bernard Cornwell. 
Zuleikha, by Guzel Yakhina and translated by Lisa Hayden. I really enjoyed this and the Kindle version is currently only 99 cents.

Currently reading -

I'm still reading Ancillary Justice - I like it but the pacing is slow and that's making me not want to hurry up and find out what happens next. I'll finish it eventually.
While I thought I was behind on The Count of Monte Cristo it turns out I got carried away and am way ahead. I've been ahead for several weeks and looking at the current chapters I have another week before the schedule catches up to me. 🙂 

I hadn't been in the mood for audio books so I was listening to podcasts, but yesterday I got notified that a book I forgot was on hold came in. The Plague Year is really good so far. If it seems like it's too soon to read about Covid-19 while we're still in the middle of it, I recommend giving this a try. I wasn't sure I wanted anything to do with the current pandemic but this author has changed my mind. 

 

Here is what fall means to me. 😂

 

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Edited by Lady Florida.
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@Lady Florida.Today we were surprised that someone decorated the local dog park with pumpkins cause they’re gonna rot but as we got closer we saw they had used a variety of JoAnn’s fake pumpkins so we get to enjoy them until Halloween!😂. I have to admit the fake pumpkins sitting out kind of crack me up but I bought a few last year and enjoyed having them. We need to find them...........

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51 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

@Lady Florida.Today we were surprised that someone decorated the local dog park with pumpkins cause they’re gonna rot but as we got closer we saw they had used a variety of JoAnn’s fake pumpkins so we get to enjoy them until Halloween!😂. I have to admit the fake pumpkins sitting out kind of crack me up but I bought a few last year and enjoyed having them. We need to find them...........

A few years ago I broke down and bought fake pumpkins. No more rotting pumpkins! 😂

 

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Last night, I stayed up late to finish Swordheart by T. Kingfisher; this was definitely a fun fantasy read with lots of enjoyable banter.

"Halla is a housekeeper who has suddenly inherited her great-uncle's estate... and, unfortunately, his relatives. Sarkis is an immortal swordsman trapped in a prison of enchanted steel. When Halla draws the sword that imprisons him, Sarkis finds himself attempting to defend his new wielder against everything from bandits and roving inquisitors to her own in-laws... and the sword itself may prove to be the greatest threat of all..."

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/21/2021 at 9:05 AM, Laurel-in-CA said:

Also read A Girl From the Channel Islands by Jenny Lecoat, a WWII story about the German occupation of these British islands. I enjoyed this one!

So good to see that you enjoyed it!!   (I have been wondering if I should start it or let the next person in the loan cue have it.) 

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Picked up a second-hand book: The Jane Austen Book Club. 1/10 sadly, it felt like the author had only watched the movies rather than read the books, and only about 10% of it was about Jane Austen anyway; the rest was a random mash of other stories connected to the characters, who were all rather unpleasant. This is why I mostly don't read popular fiction - back to fantasy and sci-fi!

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Some bookish posts ~

5 Books Featuring Fantasy Clergy

https://www.tor.com/2021/09/20/5-books-featuring-fantasy-clergy/comment-page-1/#comment-923795

Is Becky Chambers the Ultimate Hope for Science Fiction?

https://www.wired.com/story/is-becky-chambers-ultimate-hope-science-fiction/

6 COZY MYSTERIES TOLD FROM A CAT’S PURR-SPECTIVE

https://crimereads.com/6-cozy-mysteries-told-from-a-cats-purr-spective/

Regards,

Kareni

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I've done a fair bit of reading for my challenge from another site. This week's challenge was to read something under the LGBTQIA umbrella.

A Psalm for the Wild-Built (Monk & Robot Book 1) by Becky Chambers
This novella is set in Panga (perhaps a wiser future earth?) where some centuries earlier self-aware robots moved into the wilderness and disappeared. The story centers around a tea monk (non-binary) and the robot who arrives on the doorstep of the monk’s caravan to ask what people need. This was a genuinely nice (charming, lovely) story, and I recommend it. It’s the first in a series, and I look forward to reading on.
**
The Only Way Out is In by Lyn Gala
This science fiction story was written for a prompt for the Love Has No Boundaries promotion in 2013.The focal character is Jacqs (heterosexual) who is a gunner on the Candiru; quick to fight, he’s considered a troublemaker. Alex (pansexual) is a new commander on board; he sees the real Jacqs and is attracted to him. During the story, Jacqs considers what attracts him to others and ultimately declares himself stenosexual. I was intrigued by and researched the term and determined that it was created by the author. She defines it as “an individual who is sexually attracted to those who possess particular traits rather than being sexually attracted to a sexuality or gender.” I also learned that the story is the first sixteen chapters of the author’s Turbulence which I’d now like to read!
**
Sharing a Pond by Alex Whitehall
This book had a unique premise. Brent lived his first ten or so years as Brenda being raised by wolves (I couldn’t resist; his parents were shifters). On his first shift, he surprised the pack by shifting to a frog and transitioning to male. At eighteen, he was kicked out of his home and ended up in an abusive relationship. The story begins when he is rescued in a snowstorm by a pair of frog shifters, Corey and Shane, who he had been traveling to see. He met them as a child and believed them to be his mates. I particularly enjoyed the few scenes where the trio were frogs. This was a pleasant story, but I don’t expect to re-read it.
**
Ignite by Nora Phoenix
In the not too distant future, the US has split into several new countries; this story is set in the Conservative United States where homosexuality is illegal and begins at a brutal reintegration camp for young gay men. Tan (imprisoned three years), Austin (imprisoned six months), and Mack (new arrival) escape/join forces when a strange meteor shower takes out the power. The men soon learn that this is the start of an alien invasion. I enjoyed seeing these very different men bond as they worked together. This ends with a ‘to be continued’ and is the start of a completed trilogy. (Jay gave this 4.25 stars.)
**
The Year of Soup by Howard Reiss
Tess, age 30, is questioning everything — she’s had three careers and three relationships (two with men, one with a woman) — well, everything except her ability to make soup. When the book begins, she’s just opened a soup restaurant in a college town; soon she befriends Beany, an 80+ year old English professor with whom she shares soup and wine every Thursday night for a year (The Year of Soup) until he commits suicide. He leaves her a stack of letters from WWII to the present, and she reads one weekly. I REALLY enjoyed this book (I’ll admit to having a fondness for books with epistolary content); be prepared to crave soup if you read this!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/25/2021 at 3:32 AM, Kareni said:

A Psalm for the Wild-Built (Monk & Robot Book 1) by Becky Chambers

I keep looking at this . . . I really enjoyed her Wayfarer series, have read and re-read it, but wasn't as keen on her other stories. I think I will read this but trying to work out whether to buy or wait for a library copy. 

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