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sangtarah
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My parents (late 60s) and grandma  (early 90s) are scheduled to get booster shots on Monday. Mom called and wanted to know if she should get hers or not. What are the latest reports saying? Dad was vaccinated in Jan with Pfizer and Mom & grandma in Feb with Moderna. None of them had bad side effects. 

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I'm not clear on what you're asking. I didn't think that boosters had been approved yet? 

If your question is about the third dose that has been recommended/approved for immune compromised people -- DH and I had those last month. Neither of us had any trouble, although I had slightly more side effects than with the previous two doses. And by slightly I mean really slightly -- my arm was just a little more sore, and for about 12 hours I had the feeling of a swollen lymph node under my right arm (same arm where I got the injection). DH was pretty much exactly the same as with the first two doses, just a very slightly sore arm.

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38 minutes ago, sangtarah said:

My parents (late 60s) and grandma  (early 90s) are scheduled to get booster shots on Monday. Mom called and wanted to know if she should get hers or not. What are the latest reports saying? Dad was vaccinated in Jan with Pfizer and Mom & grandma in Feb with Moderna. None of them had bad side effects. 

My parents are getting theirs as soon as they can.  They are 76 and 83.  And I believe the original Pfizer is wearing off a little faster than the Moderna....so your dad for sure needs to get it...imo of course.

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Just now, Pawz4me said:

I'm not clear on what you're asking. I didn't think that boosters had been approved yet? 

If your question is about the third dose that has been recommended/approved for immune compromised people -- DH and I had those last month. Neither of us had any trouble, although I had slightly more side effects than with the previous two doses. And by slightly I mean really slightly -- my arm was just a little more sore, and for about 12 hours I had the feeling of a swollen lymph node under my right arm (same arm where I got the injection). DH was pretty much exactly the same as with the first two doses, just a very slightly sore arm.

Wait....the third dose is not the same thing as the booster?  I am confused now.

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8 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Wait....the third dose is not the same thing as the booster?  I am confused now.

Lots of people are confused! Although people are commonly referring to the third dose recommended for immune compromised people as a booster that's incorrect terminology. It's a third dose, part of the initial series immune compromised people need to get good immunity. A booster is given when immunity is waning. Immune compromised need three doses to get good immunity to begin with, but may also need a booster later on.

This is a fairly good explainer.

Edited by Pawz4me
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4 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Wait....the third dose is not the same thing as the booster?  I am confused now.

The Pfizer booster is exactly the same dose as the first two shots (30 µg), The Moderna booster will be half of the original two shots (50 µg vs 100).

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9 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I'm not clear on what you're asking. I didn't think that boosters had been approved yet? 

 

I didn’t think so either, but dad works at the hospital, and they are giving “boosters” to those that want them. None of them are immunocompromised. 
 

Florida is kinda like the Wild Wild West. Everyone looks out for themselves. 😖

Edited by sangtarah
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47 minutes ago, sangtarah said:

My parents (late 60s) and grandma  (early 90s) are scheduled to get booster shots on Monday. Mom called and wanted to know if she should get hers or not. What are the latest reports saying? Dad was vaccinated in Jan with Pfizer and Mom & grandma in Feb with Moderna. None of them had bad side effects. 

If they are scheduled to get them on Monday, I assume they are getting Pfizer. The data Pfizer released last month showed an 11-fold increase in antibodies following the 3rd/booster dose in those over 55, which was shown to be highly effective against Delta. So I would definitely recommend they get it.

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Just now, sangtarah said:

I didn’t think so either, but dad works at the hospital, and they are giving “boosters” to those that want them. None of them are immunocompromised. 

Since Pfizer now has a full biologics license, it can legally be used off-label, even if the FDA has not formally approved boosters. 

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1 minute ago, Corraleno said:

If they are scheduled to get them on Monday, I assume they are getting Pfizer. The data Pfizer released last month showed an 11-fold increase in antibodies following the 3rd/booster dose in those over 55, which was shown to be highly effective against Delta. So I would definitely recommend they get it.

Mom said she and grandma are scheduled to get Moderna, since that’s what they had initially. 

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Just now, sangtarah said:

Mom said she and grandma are scheduled to get Moderna, since that’s what they had initially. 

Well technically Moderna is not approved for boosters in anyone who does not meet fairly strict definitions for being immunocompromised, and the 3rd dose that is approved for immunocompromised under the existing EUA is a full 100 µg dose, not a 50 µg booster. If they are getting the full 100 µg dose and are not actually immunocompromised, then I would want to do as much as possible to minimize potential side effects (drink tons of water the day before, day of, and day after; move the arm as much as possible, etc.)

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My mom will be getting a 3rd Moderna in two weeks - she had a mammogram today and her first Prolia injection or she'd have gotten it already. Wanted to wait until after mammogram,and then doctor said to wait 2 weeks after Prolia. 

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So, I follow the TWIV podcast religiously. This Week in Virology. They are still saying no booster is needed for those who aren't immunocompromised. They just released an episode on boosters. They are really good about just nerding out on the science and not really getting excited about anything. I have found them to be right time and time again. They are extremely covid cautious and absolutely recommend you get the first two doses. 

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1 hour ago, staceyobu said:

So, I follow the TWIV podcast religiously. This Week in Virology. They are still saying no booster is needed for those who aren't immunocompromised. They just released an episode on boosters. They are really good about just nerding out on the science and not really getting excited about anything. I have found them to be right time and time again. They are extremely covid cautious and absolutely recommend you get the first two doses. 

If you are only concerned abou your own health, I agree. But if you live with unvaccinated people, or high risk people, then getting a booster makes sense, as you are worried not just about severe illness prevention, but about preventing transmission as much as possible. 

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COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot | CDC

I am really confused about the booster/third dose situation.  My mom is scheduled to get a third Moderna shot on Monday.  She is not immunoccompromised.  This is not scheduled through her physician; she has not been advised that she personally falls into any category for which a third dose is currently recommended.   Who is recommending that a third dose of Moderna be given?   

 

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19 hours ago, ktgrok said:

If you are only concerned abou your own health, I agree. But if you live with unvaccinated people, or high risk people, then getting a booster makes sense, as you are worried not just about severe illness prevention, but about preventing transmission as much as possible. 

Yeah, I'm so upset that I'm not going to be able to get a booster.  I feel like it's the only way I can protect my kids until they can get vaccinated themselves.  I think I am ready to lie about it in order to get one.

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3 hours ago, Syllieann said:

Yeah, I'm so upset that I'm not going to be able to get a booster.  I feel like it's the only way I can protect my kids until they can get vaccinated themselves.  I think I am ready to lie about it in order to get one.

But the two dose regimen does protect your kids. There has also been at least one study showing that post vaccine infections tend to have fewer days of being contagious.

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31 minutes ago, staceyobu said:

But the two dose regimen does protect your kids. There has also been at least one study showing that post vaccine infections tend to have fewer days of being contagious.

It offers SOME protection, but in our family of 4 vaccinated adults, one has already had Covid post vaccine. Breakthrough infections are not uncommon. 

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Much of the misinformation on this can be credited to the president declaring that everyone would need and get a booster shot eight months after their second dose.

https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-health-coronavirus-pandemic-404cf650431f8aeee17d333180760337

A key government advisory panel overwhelmingly rejected Biden’s plan to give COVID-19 booster shots across the board and instead recommended the extra vaccine dose only for those who are age 65 or older or who run a high risk of severe disease.

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My mom will get a booster in a few weeks, hopefully (waiting on mammogram results, if she needs more views, which is common, she will wait until after those are done as the vaccine can cause enlarged lymph nodes that interfere with mammogram images). 

But then I just get to go from worrying about her dying of Covid to worrying about her dying because she has some other health emergency and can't get an ambulance or timely treatment due to the unvaccinated covid patients clogging up the hospitals here in Florida. The EMS system in her county has already said they can't handle the current volume. @Lady Florida.has a relative in the system and can attest to this issue. 

So yeah, unvaccinated people are screwing over even the vaccinated people. 

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It's interesting how this is being handled so differently in different states.  Boosters do not come easily here.  Those who are immunocompromised can talk with their doctor about getting a booster, but they need a doctor's order then to get it.  No one else is getting it.  Even very elderly people cannot yet get it.

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2 hours ago, Fritz said:

Much of the misinformation on this can be credited to the president declaring that everyone would need and get a booster shot eight months after their second dose.

https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-health-coronavirus-pandemic-404cf650431f8aeee17d333180760337

A key government advisory panel overwhelmingly rejected Biden’s plan to give COVID-19 booster shots across the board and instead recommended the extra vaccine dose only for those who are age 65 or older or who run a high risk of severe disease.

Nope, everyone can just suck it up and get covid and hope your vaccine dose is protective enough against severe disease and death, because increasing the likelihood of preventing your infection doesn't change the course of the pandemic. In reality the number of people that would be considered high risk of disease, those with any medical condition, obesity, would be very high in the US. It's a nonbinding recommendation and I'll be interested to see what happens next week.

Edited by melmichigan
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51 minutes ago, J-rap said:

It's interesting how this is being handled so differently in different states.  Boosters do not come easily here.  Those who are immunocompromised can talk with their doctor about getting a booster, but they need a doctor's order then to get it.  No one else is getting it.  Even very elderly people cannot yet get it.

Same

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On 9/18/2021 at 10:21 AM, ktgrok said:

 

But then I just get to go from worrying about her dying of Covid to worrying about her dying because she has some other health emergency and can't get an ambulance or timely treatment due to the unvaccinated covid patients clogging up the hospitals here in Florida. The EMS system in her county has already said they can't handle the current volume. @Lady Florida.has a relative in the system and can attest to this issue. 

So yeah, unvaccinated people are screwing over even the vaccinated people. 

Yep. Ddil says they're overwhelmed. The hospitals have asked people not to go to ER if they can help it. Dss has to transport people to ER but sometimes if they can stabilize a patient in the ambulance they just sit outside and wait until the ER can fit them in.

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3 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

Yep. Ddil says they're overwhelmed. The hospitals have asked people not to go to ER if they can help it. Dss has to transport people to ER but sometimes if they can stabilize a patient in the ambulance they just sit outside and wait until the ER can fit them in.

ugh! I hate this. Last time mom fell she had to go by ambulance - she has very little use of her hands so can't catch herself when she falls. Shattered her shoulder into multiple pieces. It could happen again at any time. 

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On 9/18/2021 at 11:40 AM, melmichigan said:

Nope, everyone can just suck it up and get covid and hope your vaccine dose is protective enough against severe disease and death, because increasing the likelihood of preventing your infection doesn't change the course of the pandemic. In reality the number of people that would be considered high risk of disease, those with any medical condition, obesity, would be very high in the US. It's a nonbinding recommendation and I'll be interested to see what happens next week.

As it turns out CDC overruled the FDA panels recommendation on boosters. Seems to me we should be more concerned with getting first and second dose vaccines to others who have not had access before going beyond boosters for those truly at high risk here. 

https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20210923/cdc-panel-backs-pfizer-boosters-select-groups

The vote on boosters for healthcare and other high-risk workers was rejected 9 to 6.

“I think that there is ample evidence that people such as a healthcare workers do not have repeated exposure in the workplace,” said Beth Bell, MD, a clinical professor at the University of Washington. “They're using PPE as they should and they're following the other policies within the healthcare setting. There's lots of evidence that suggest that health care workers who become infected become infected because of exposures in the community.”

She was not alone in feeling cautious.

“I think this is an extremely slippery slope,” said Sarah Long, MD, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Drexel University in Philadelphia, before her vote to reject boosters for healthcare and other high-risk workers.

“We might as well just say, ‘Give it to everybody 18 and over.’ We have an extremely effective vaccine. It’s like saying it’s not working and it is working.”

The committee saw data showing that all of the vaccines remain highly protective against hospitalization and death for all age groups, though protection against getting sick with COVID has waned slightly over time and with the dominance of the more contagious Delta variant. Those at highest risk for a severe breakthrough infection — those that cause hospitalization or death — are older adults.

How Much Will the U.S. Benefit from Boosters?

Some felt squeamish about broadly recommending boosters at all.

“We have too much hope on the line with these boosters,” said James Loehr, MD, who is a family practice doctor in Ithaca, NY. Loehr said he felt like the goal of giving boosters in the U.S. should be to decrease hospitalizations, and he felt they would, but that the impact would likely be smaller than appreciated.

Based on his calculations of the benefits of boosters for each age group, Loehr said if boosters were given to all 13 million seniors previously vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine, we might prevent 200 hospitalizations a day, “which would be a lot,” he noted. But, he said, “considering that we have 10,000 hospitalization a day now, it’s probably not that much.”

Others agreed.

“I really think this is a solution looking for a problem,” said Jason Goldman, MD, an associate professor at Florida Atlantic University who was representing the American College of Physicians. “You know, I don't think it's going to address the issue of the pandemic. I really think it's just going to create more confusion on the provider from the position of implementation, and I really think it's going really far afield of the data.”

 

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I got mine today (and according to the pharmacist, would have qualified for a third dose as well, as opposed to a booster). 

 

FWIW, I got mine at a Walmart, since they were the ones who had appointments available on their website for boosters already, and they seemed to be putting a lot of effort into making it easy and encouraging people to get the vaccine at all. I'm definitely not seeing a backing off of trying to get people first shots. 

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1 minute ago, Scarlett said:

I am so confused. What is the latest? Can my 76/83 year old parents get a booster or third shot if they had their second shot in Mid feb?

If they had Pfizer, they should be able to get a Pfizer booster now. If they had Moderna or J&J, they may need to find a doctor who will do a Pfizer booster off label, or else wait for those boosters.

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According to our County health department (your area may be recommending otherwise):

  1. Booster shots are recommended for certain populations if they have certain health conditions or are in certain age groups
    1. Only for those who have received Pfizer
    2. And Meet certain medical needs, including immunocompromised and some underlying medical conditions
    3. 6+ months after their primary series has been completed
  2. 3-dose schedule is now standard of care for immunocompromised individuals getting the vaccine for the first time (I do not see any brand-specific information on this)
  3. Moderna or J&J vaccinated people do not need booster shots and it is currently not approved
  4. Mixing and matching of vaccines is not approved

 

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11 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

If they had Moderna can they maybe get a third shot of Moderna now? 

If they qualify as immunocompromised. The pharmacist said I would have qualified as such, even though I didn’t read it that way myself, so it might be worth checking. I do wonder how much of it has to do with where you go-I can easily see pharmacists in the South being more willing to vaccinate borderline cases than in, say, Vermont.

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35 minutes ago, Moonhawk said:

some underlying medical conditions

The CDC had these spelled out on their website for anyone looking. They are all the ones that qualified people for shots a little earlier than others in the spring, plus some that have been added (like hypertension, which should have been there from the start, but was quietly added late spring).

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They are all over 65 and in a high transmission area with low masking compliance? Yup, I would be recommending a booster for them. Older adults tend to have less immunoresponse overall.

Fwiw, I had a third dose and it was easier than my second. Drink water, plan on having a quiet Tuesday, and best wishes to them all!

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I was in Walmart this morning, and they had a table and little cardboard booth set up on the opposite side from the pharmacy that was offering Pfizer 1,2,and 3 (if qualified), and flu shots. I got my 3rd vaccine and flu shot today. I hope it doesn't overload me too much!😛 So far, four hours later, my flu arm is a little sore, but that's it.

On the covid paper, they had a list of conditions at the bottom that would qualify you if you were under 65, including hypertension, diabetes, etc., etc.

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37 minutes ago, Dmmetler said:

If they qualify as immunocompromised. The pharmacist said I would have qualified as such, even though I didn’t read it that way myself, so it might be worth checking. I do wonder how much of it has to do with where you go-I can easily see pharmacists in the South being more willing to vaccinate borderline cases than in, say, Vermont.

If you don't mind me asking, how did that work?  Was it condition?  Or a medication?  

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11 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

If you don't mind me asking, how did that work?  Was it condition?  Or a medication?  

She just said I would have qualified-I’m not sure if it was the autoimmune disorder or my meds list or what. Anyway, I definitely qualified for a booster. 

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I think this is getting really confusing.

Like people who have the immune compromising conditions/medications that were announced awhile back -- the recommendation for those people is to have a third dose at least 28 days after the second dose.

The boosters--for people who qualify--are being recommended at least six months after the second dose.

People--and doctors and pharmacists--need to understand which category people fall into.

And we don't know if immune compromised people--the people who need three doses--are going to need a booster a few months (six?) after their third dose.

🤨

 

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My state is now giving them to teachers/health care workers/child care workers, etc. also, as approved by CDC director Walensky on Friday morning. I walked into my local pharmacy yesterday, showed my school staff ID and my vaccine card with second dose 7.5 months ago, and got a booster on the spot.

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2 hours ago, Dmmetler said:

She just said I would have qualified-I’m not sure if it was the autoimmune disorder or my meds list or what. Anyway, I definitely qualified for a booster. 

Hmmm.  I am wondering if I missed the boat on the 3rd shot not the booster.   Is there somewhere that posts all the conditions or meds? 

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35 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

Hmmm.  I am wondering if I missed the boat on the 3rd shot not the booster.   Is there somewhere that posts all the conditions or meds? 

The CDC has that info --

Quote

Currently, CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose. This includes people who have:

Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
Advanced or untreated HIV infection
Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

 

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37 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

Hmmm.  I am wondering if I missed the boat on the 3rd shot not the booster.   Is there somewhere that posts all the conditions or meds? 

If you're talking about Pfizer, the booster and the "3rd shot" are exactly the same (30 µg). With Moderna, a 3rd shot is the full 100 µg dose, but the booster is 50 µg.

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I got my Pfizer booster and flu shot yesterday. Finally! I feel so relieved. 🙂

ETA: Same as with my other two shots, no side effects other than a sore arm.

Edited by SeaConquest
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2 hours ago, mommyoffive said:

Hmmm.  I am wondering if I missed the boat on the 3rd shot not the booster.   Is there somewhere that posts all the conditions or meds? 

I have been told the answer to that question is no.  I am due to get a 3rd shot whenever I can come off treatment again long enough to make it worthwhile.  We haven't yet heard when a booster would then be needed, but is being studied with the expectation being 6 months after the 3rd dose.

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A couple of random questions:

- Do we need to wait the full six months? I’d like to schedule with DH, which will put me a week early.

- How long for the booster to take full effect? Anyone know when the effectiveness increases again?

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My parents (78 and 79) went over to Walgreens on Friday as soon as they saw the announcement and were able to get their boosters as walk-ins.  They were vaccinated with Pfizer in January and had already unsuccessfully tried twice to get boosters.   My mom has had zero side effects (same as for her first two shots); dad feels kinda achy and warm.

DH and I were vaccinated in April.  It sure seems like we will need a third shot eventually but our exposure is low and I am content to wait a while until there is some decent evidence on the optimal spacing.

I cannot WAIT to get DS11 vaccinated already.  

 

 

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Today was Pfizer booster for me. The pharmacist said the Pfizer is the same dosage as the first two shots. She got Moderna and according to our state has to wait for Moderna booster to be approved. 

You have to be 6 months post second shot and fall into the CDC guidelines of age, or health or work conditions.

I'm guessing they will be recommended for everyone once the first round gets them. 

 

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