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CC: Good Samaritan


lauraw4321
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6 minutes ago, lauraw4321 said:

If Jesus were telling the parable of the Good Samaritan today in America, who would be the Good Samaritan?

A muslim man?

An atheist?

Who would be the Priest and the Levite?

A pastor and a deacon?

I think it could be anyone. I think the point of parables is that we apply them to our own lives.

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That’s a compelling question. You have me thinking. Honestly, I think in the US, the answer to that question is likely political. As such, I’m not sure I can give my answer here, though maybe it’s okay because it has nothing to do with any specific politicians. I can think of some non-political possibilities, but I don’t think they are the most likely.

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1 minute ago, Janeway said:

I think it could be anyone. I think the point of parables is that we apply them to our own lives.

While the point of the parable applies to anyone and thus it could be anyone, I think each person in the story was named for the part they played for a specific reason. It’s not an accident Jesus specifically chose a Samaritan, who his listeners would likely have negative feelings toward, as the only one truly acting as a neighbor.

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14 hours ago, lauraw4321 said:

I disagree. Jesus was being religiously provocative. I’m curious what are the modern day equivalents. 

Well, a Muslim might been a Baptist is the Samaritan. A Baptist might think an LGTBQ person is the Samaritan. Jesus was speaking to a specific audience so it applied to that audience as his story said. There is no "enemy" or "bad person" that the Samaritan represented that would be universal to all, not even on this board. 

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9 minutes ago, Janeway said:

Well, a Muslim might been a Baptist is the Samaritan. A Baptist might think an LGTBQ person is the Samaritan. Jesus was speaking to a specific audience so it applied to that audience as his story said. There is no "enemy" or "bad person" that the Samaritan represented that would be universal to all, not even on this board. 

Sure. But this is a lesson for Christians, so I’m talking from a Christian standpoint (ie, priest and Levite’s have to be Christians).

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2 minutes ago, lauraw4321 said:

Sure. But this is a lesson for Christians, so I’m talking from a Christian standpoint (ie, priest and Levite’s have to be Christians).

To be a direct parallel with the Jew-Samaritan relationship the Samaritan would be from whatever branch of Christianity the Christians being addressed consider to be not-really-Christians and the priest and the Levite would be closely related to whatever leaders the particular audience follows.  
 

 

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Just now, Danae said:

To be a direct parallel with the Jew-Samaritan relationship the Samaritan would be from whatever branch of Christianity the Christians being addressed consider to be not-really-Christians and the priest and the Levite would be closely related to whatever leaders the particular audience follows.  
 

 

So… Mormon or JW in the minds of some, for example?

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14 hours ago, lauraw4321 said:

I disagree. Jesus was being religiously provocative. I’m curious what are the modern day equivalents. 

Depends on your audience/students. Tailor the lesson to be challenging to them. Who are they likely to think highly or poorly of, without thinking? 

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15 hours ago, lauraw4321 said:

If Jesus were telling the parable of the Good Samaritan today in America, who would be the Good Samaritan?

A muslim man?

An atheist?

Who would be the Priest and the Levite?

A pastor and a deacon?

I think it's hard to think of someone because there isn't a modern equivalent of Samaritans (unclean heretics) in America. 

Also even the most bigoted person in the USA could still conceive of a Muslim person being kind. I don't mean that we're more enlightened. It's that modern people think about the world very differently from ancient people. Also, Americans don't think of themselves like the ancient Jews thought of themselves, as a sacred people who would be profaned by contact with others. 

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I don't think modern Americans really have an equivalent hate group with to match the intensity of Jewish rejection of Samaritans.

The priest and Levite also have implicit motives that their avoidance was out of concern for holiness and an intent to obey the Torah as they understood it. I don't know any role in society where a person would risk becoming unclean through compassion to someone near death. That's not really a thing any more for the statistical majority of folks, and I'm not even sure how modern Jewish people think about it.

The cultures really are wildly different. I don't think we can draw direct lines.

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10 minutes ago, bolt. said:

I don't think modern Americans really have an equivalent hate group with to match the intensity of Jewish rejection of Samaritans.

The priest and Levite also have implicit motives that their avoidance was out of concern for holiness and an intent to obey the Torah as they understood it. I don't know any role in society where a person would risk becoming unclean through compassion to someone near death. That's not really a thing any more for the statistical majority of folks, and I'm not even sure how modern Jewish people think about it.

The cultures really are wildly different. I don't think we can draw direct lines.

We modern Jews (even the most Orthodox) don't have any purity laws as there were back in the days of the Temple. The genders don't touch and some Orthodox Jews will not overly much interact with the opposite gender. They might not want to interact much with non-Jews either.

BTW there are modern day Samaritans who live in Israel and other places today. They aren't discriminated against any more than any other minority group (meaning it's likely there could be discrimination but not specifically because they are Samaritans).

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5 hours ago, Danae said:

To be a direct parallel with the Jew-Samaritan relationship the Samaritan would be from whatever branch of Christianity the Christians being addressed consider to be not-really-Christians and the priest and the Levite would be closely related to whatever leaders the particular audience follows.  
 

I think it would have to be someone more hated/disdained than just not considered true Christians. I'm thinking something like a politically liberal Christian who would usually be hated for being a "libt**d" by the injured politically conservative Christian 😳. I don't know if that's okay to say, but it's what my brain keeps coming to as the closest I can think of, even though it doesn't have the same "unclean" aspect.

5 hours ago, lauraw4321 said:

So… Mormon or JW in the minds of some, for example?

I thought about that, but to me that does seem different, in that I don't think the visceral feelings toward those groups are nearly as strong as the political feelings people have toward other Christians on a different end of the political spectrum. I think LDS or JW are just considered in a different group and don't cause the same type of strong negativity, often reaching the point of hatred for some. (I just read some of this on Twitter, which leaves me pretty depressed when I see it.)

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On 9/1/2021 at 5:53 AM, lauraw4321 said:

If Jesus were telling the parable of the Good Samaritan today in America, who would be the Good Samaritan?

A muslim man?

An atheist?

Who would be the Priest and the Levite?

A pastor and a deacon?

I suppose it would depend on who he was telling it to. Or do you think he would only be talking to Christians? 

I do think it rather dryly hilarious that Jesus, in answering the Levite's question "Who is my neighbor" picks the literal neighbors of Israel (Samaritans currently live in Sebastia, neighbors to Israelies). Like, duh. 

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20 hours ago, KSera said:

I think it would have to be someone more hated/disdained than just not considered true Christians. I'm thinking something like a politically liberal Christian who would usually be hated for being a "libt**d" by the injured politically conservative Christian 😳. I don't know if that's okay to say, but it's what my brain keeps coming to as the closest I can think of, even though it doesn't have the same "unclean" aspect.

I thought about that, but to me that does seem different, in that I don't think the visceral feelings toward those groups are nearly as strong as the political feelings people have toward other Christians on a different end of the political spectrum. I think LDS or JW are just considered in a different group and don't cause the same type of strong negativity, often reaching the point of hatred for some. (I just read some of this on Twitter, which leaves me pretty depressed when I see it.)

I was trying to express this same thing, and realized you said it just right.  🙂  I don't think of non-Christians or people of other religions as fitting the picture of the Good Samaritan during this present day.  They're not hated enough.   It keeps coming back to politics in my mind.

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