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Echocardiogram results Update with monitor results 8/31


Scarlett
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Update 8/31  Does anyone know if these monitor results have to do with the Echo results?  I mean....are they related?  Does one set of issues cause the other?

Monitor results---

The patient was monitored for 26 days, 18 hours, 7 min.
 
The predominant rhythm was sinus with intact AV conduction. Rates ranged from 50 to 178 bpm with an average of 80 bpm.
 
Isolated PACs were present
 
PSVT was present
 
Isolated PVCs were present.
 
Symptoms correlated with PSVT onset and sinus tachycardia.>>>
 

 

We will go for a follow up but does anyone know if this is concerning?

Conclusions:
 
  1. The left ventricular ejection fraction is preserved at 63%
  2. Normal diastolic function
  3. Mild tricuspid regurgitation.
  4. Mildly enlarged left atrium.
Edited by Scarlett
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17 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

We will go for a follow up but does anyone know if this is concerning?

Conclusions:
 
  1. The left ventricular ejection fraction is preserved at 63%
  2. Normal diastolic function
  3. Mild tricuspid regurgitation.
  4. Mildly enlarged left atrium.

An ejection fraction of 63% is good news.

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I think the mild tricuspid regurgitation means a leaky valve. Similar to mitral valve prolapse, but the tricuspid valve. If it's mild it may not be a big deal. I have mild mitral valve prolapse and (knock on wood) it never bothers me.

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Geez!  I am totally in your corner.  I had one done and I received results of the echocardium before I was supposed to have my follow-up appt!!!  I was freaking out at all the langauge and looking everything up on the Web, scarry results.  For me, most were within range and only 1 thing pop up that made the doctor ask me if I snore.  Otherwise, she just turned the page.

I had the "Mild tricuspid regurgitation."  I dont know about the others.  It was normal results for me, too with strange words!

I forgot to add- I had to wait 3 weeks for my doctor to tell me my results!!!!

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1 hour ago, Nicholas_mom said:

Geez!  I am totally in your corner.  I had one done and I received results of the echocardium before I was supposed to have my follow-up appt!!!  I was freaking out at all the langauge and looking everything up on the Web, scarry results.  For me, most were within range and only 1 thing pop up that made the doctor ask me if I snore.  Otherwise, she just turned the page.

I had the "Mild tricuspid regurgitation."  I dont know about the others.  It was normal results for me, too with strange words!

I forgot to add- I had to wait 3 weeks for my doctor to tell me my results!!!!

Yes his follow up is about 3 weeks away.  I think I will call and try to move it up. 

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36 minutes ago, hippymamato3 said:

All that seems pretty good and mild! They will likely keep an eye on the regurgitation, but I don't expect they'd need to do anything further now.

 

Number 4 n the list can cause fainting.,,..but I doubt his is severe enough for that. 

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2 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

I think the mild tricuspid regurgitation means a leaky valve. Similar to mitral valve prolapse, but the tricuspid valve. If it's mild it may not be a big deal. I have mild mitral valve prolapse and (knock on wood) it never bothers me.

I have MVP too and I also thought that tricuspid regurgitation was similar.

IME, the word mild repeated on the test results is a very good thing.

My kids and I have had multiple echos.  Dd11's first echo was when she was 12 hours old.  I will say that I love the pediatric echos because the cardiologist usually performs the test and gives immediate feedback.

Also, IME, when I had some truly concerning lab results (bloodwork, not an echo), the doctor called me at home and told me that I needed to take immediate action.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
This is the result of dh's heart monitor that he wore for 30 days.  I have consulted Google and I think it sounds like he will need an ablation....does anyone have any insight?  His follow up is Sept 9, but I am nervous about this.
 
 
>>>>>The patient was monitored for 26 days, 18 hours, 7 min.
 
The predominant rhythm was sinus with intact AV conduction. Rates ranged from 50 to 178 bpm with an average of 80 bpm.
 
Isolated PACs were present
 
PSVT was present
 
Isolated PVCs were present.
 
Symptoms correlated with PSVT onset and sinus tachycardia.>>>>
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  • Scarlett changed the title to Echocardiogram results Update with monitor results 8/31
55 minutes ago, Scarlett said:
This is the result of dh's heart monitor that he wore for 30 days.  I have consulted Google and I think it sounds like he will need an ablation....does anyone have any insight?  His follow up is Sept 9, but I am nervous about this.
 
 
>>>>>The patient was monitored for 26 days, 18 hours, 7 min.
 
The predominant rhythm was sinus with intact AV conduction. Rates ranged from 50 to 178 bpm with an average of 80 bpm.
 
Isolated PACs were present
 
PSVT was present
 
Isolated PVCs were present.
 
Symptoms correlated with PSVT onset and sinus tachycardia.>>>>

I would say it depends on how frequent it is and what his symptoms are. Is he able to stop the tachycardia with a Valsalva maneuver? Has he been taught to do that? I went through a couple years of really bad PVCs, with thousands a day sometimes, but my cardiologist didn’t want to do anything about it with them at that point (and then they went away when I got pregnant again). I don’t have any personal experience with PVST though, so I don’t know what the threshold is for going ahead with an ablation for that. FWIW, when I was having so many PVCs, the thought of an ablation didn’t even bother me, because I was so uncomfortable from the symptoms. If his is really bothersome, he might feel the same way.

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20 minutes ago, KSera said:

I would say it depends on how frequent it is and what his symptoms are. Is he able to stop the tachycardia with a Valsalva maneuver? Has he been taught to do that? I went through a couple years of really bad PVCs, with thousands a day sometimes, but my cardiologist didn’t want to do anything about it with them at that point (and then they went away when I got pregnant again). I don’t have any personal experience with PVST though, so I don’t know what the threshold is for going ahead with an ablation for that. FWIW, when I was having so many PVCs, the thought of an ablation didn’t even bother me, because I was so uncomfortable from the symptoms. If his is really bothersome, he might feel the same way.

His main symptom is fainting.  He doesn't do that often...4 times in 5 years...with a few other times he avoided fainting.  I suspect his fatigue and general feeling of unwell is related to this heart issue and it has come on slowly enough he doesn't realize how affected he is. The rapid heart rate bothers him a lot but also sporadically.  If that makes sense.  Seemingly no pattern to when or where or how long.

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My mother has Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome which causes paroxysmal supraventicular tachycardia (PSVT). It can cause lightheadedness, fainting, shortness of breath, and some other stuff. It is generally managed with a beta-blocker like metoprolol, but in severe cases there is an ablation surgery they can do. Aside from her metoprolol the things she was warned to pay attention to were her overall stress levels, stimulant intake (no caffeine), and her thyroid levels (high t3 can cause episodes of refractory SVT).

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3 hours ago, Scarlett said:
This is the result of dh's heart monitor that he wore for 30 days.  I have consulted Google and I think it sounds like he will need an ablation....does anyone have any insight?  His follow up is Sept 9, but I am nervous about this.
 
 
>>>>>The patient was monitored for 26 days, 18 hours, 7 min.
 
The predominant rhythm was sinus with intact AV conduction. Rates ranged from 50 to 178 bpm with an average of 80 bpm.
 
Isolated PACs were present
 
PSVT was present
 
Isolated PVCs were present.
 
Symptoms correlated with PSVT onset and sinus tachycardia.>>>>

Echo- nothing that I would be concerned about.

monitor- PSVT can be treated with meds or ablation. There are pros and cons to both, which the dr will go over with him. I had an ablation and am glad I did but I was in my 20's and not ready to commit to a med. My arrhythmia was also incredibly frequent. If I had the same issue now, I would probably go on a beta-blocker. 

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1 minute ago, sassenach said:

Echo- nothing that I would be concerned about.

monitor- PSVT can be treated with meds or ablation. There are pros and cons to both, which the dr will go over with him. I had an ablation and am glad I did but I was in my 20's and not ready to commit to a med. My arrhythmia was also incredibly frequent. If I had the same issue now, I would probably go on a beta-blocker. 

Dh is already on blood thinners so I hate for him to add another med or even if the two can be taken together.  I would definitely lean toward ablation if it were me.  

So no trouble since you had the ablation?

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59 minutes ago, eagleynne said:

My mother has Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome which causes paroxysmal supraventicular tachycardia (PSVT). It can cause lightheadedness, fainting, shortness of breath, and some other stuff. It is generally managed with a beta-blocker like metoprolol, but in severe cases there is an ablation surgery they can do. Aside from her metoprolol the things she was warned to pay attention to were her overall stress levels, stimulant intake (no caffeine), and her thyroid levels (high t3 can cause episodes of refractory SVT).

From what I read that is the rare version of what this might be.....but also if I understand it correctly they basically diagnose the type and repair at the same time. It is kind of confusing.

Thanks for taking the time to post.  The more I learn before the doctor visit the better. I will at least know what questions to ask.

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Having had multiple kids in my home that needed frequent follow ups with a cardiologist, I'd say it's a good idea to not do this.  Get off Google.  Rhythms and issues and the way they are best dealt with are so individual that you're probably NOT going to find the diagnosis here, you'll just find a bunch of scary information.  What triggered heart failure and surgery in one child did not in another. It really has a lot to do with the whole picture, not isolated incidents. Go in with your ears open. Take notes. Chances are high the cardiologist will give you a diagram of the heart and write down exactly what is going on so you can reference it later, when you have a clearer mind.  Only when you know exactly what is happening is it time to google. Chances are there is nothing so urgent that it needs surgery now or they would have had you in for a follow up immediately.

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13 minutes ago, Katy said:

Having had multiple kids in my home that needed frequent follow ups with a cardiologist, I'd say it's a good idea to not do this.  Get off Google.  Rhythms and issues and the way they are best dealt with are so individual that you're probably NOT going to find the diagnosis here, you'll just find a bunch of scary information.  What triggered heart failure and surgery in one child did not in another. It really has a lot to do with the whole picture, not isolated incidents. Go in with your ears open. Take notes. Chances are high the cardiologist will give you a diagram of the heart and write down exactly what is going on so you can reference it later, when you have a clearer mind.  Only when you know exactly what is happening is it time to google. Chances are there is nothing so urgent that it needs surgery now or they would have had you in for a follow up immediately.

Well, too late for me not to do it.  I have gathered a lot of info.  And I am not worried about it being a critical issue because we have had no phone call from the cardiologist.  I have to gather info ahead of time especially on medical terms that are not familiar to me.  

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3 hours ago, Scarlett said:

Dh is already on blood thinners so I hate for him to add another med or even if the two can be taken together.  I would definitely lean toward ablation if it were me.  

So no trouble since you had the ablation?

They would likely add a beta blocker, which is not a big deal in the grand scheme of things. Yes, the ablation fixed my issue, mostly. Wine or sweets can occasionally set it off. The ablation was unpleasant but not the end of the world. They had to punch through to my left atria and that’s the main reason I wouldn’t do it again. Just an extra risk that I didn’t really enjoy taking on. 

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My DD had SVT but never passed out. She knew tricks to get over the episodes but in her senior year of high school the episodes started coming very frequently. We opted for the ablation and it's stopped the SVT. It was a quick surgery and easy recovery for her.

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