Jump to content

Menu

Face-to-face school - anyone else's kids start yet?


Recommended Posts

7 minutes ago, Spryte said:

Right, talk about exponential growth. 

Our quarantined next door neighbor is getting tested. Our other neighborhood kid I mentioned above is just out and about as normal, visiting various houses to find a kid who can hang out … knocking on doors, biking to stores, unlikely that he will get tested. Hopefully he is healthy, and stays well, not positive. He’s a sweet kid with a rough life.

I don’t know what to make of the thought that this variant is inescapable. It may be, but that’s a hard concept to swallow with immune compromised kids, and self. I’m not ready for what that means. It would be an easier thought to swallow if our family were robustly healthy like some we know.

Aside from vaxing when possible and using a self-protective mask design, there are lists of mitigation measures that can be taken to reduce the impact of the virus.

In our district, they have an all-virtual school option, which I would recommend for high risk families.  But I understand this is not a realistic option for everyone.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, SKL said:

Aside from vaxing when possible and using a self-protective mask design, there are lists of mitigation measures that can be taken to reduce the impact of the virus.

In our district, they have an all-virtual school option, which I would recommend for high risk families.  But I understand this is not a realistic option for everyone.

Our district has a virtual school option as well, so families who need it can use it, if they can work out the logistics. It’s a separate entity from regular school, and I’m not sure how it works. I think an optional hybrid choice would have helped this year, more than last, but that’s not available here this year.

I, personally, will feel better when DD10, high risk for complications with any illness, is vaccinated. Until then, we are being more cautious than some, based on her risk factors.

We homeschool for reasons other than Covid, so I don’t have a direct dog in the fight re: public school handling of everything, other than how it impacts community spread, and kids in our extracurriculars and (large) friend group. I think all of you with PS kids are doing the best you can, with a crappy situation, and wish the circumstances were better.  

For us, when community transmission is lower, we benefit directly by doing more of our activities and outings, and seeing more friends and family. When it’s high, we are more isolated. We have a loose plan, with our docs, re: what to do if one of our high risk peeps gets sick, but it feels pretty inadequate, frankly. If any of you know offhand of mitigation measure lists, I’m all ears and will take notes. 

ETA: I’m typing this from the front porch, with espresso. 10 am, school day. And the aforementioned, probably “quarantined” teen just rode through our cul de sac, doing wheelies and waving. Ha! Timing! I suppose there’s a minuscule chance they are homeschooling this year, but highly unlikely.

Edited by Spryte
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Spryte said:

ETA: I’m typing this from the front porch, with espresso. 10 am, school day. And the aforementioned, probably “quarantined” teen just rode through our cul de sac, doing wheelies and waving. Ha! Timing! I suppose there’s a minuscule chance they are homeschooling this year, but highly unlikely.

FYI when my daughter was quarantined last year (January) I did allow her to go outside. Even on her bike once. But she was instructed to keep her distance. So knocking on friends' doors would not have happened. And we mostly kept to our backyard. But I also would not have thought being quarantined meant being locked inside the house, not allowed outside. Outside, fresh air, away from people was fine.

 

ANd at least last year she had schoolwork to keep her busy part of the day. Without the virtual work to do, this year quarantine would be even more boring.

Edited by vonfirmath
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

FYI when my daughter was quarantined last year (January) I did allow her to go outside. Even on her bike once. But she was instructed to keep her distance. So knocking on friends' doors would not have happened. And we mostly kept to our backyard. But I also would not have thought being quarantined meant being locked inside the house, not allowed outside. Outside, fresh air, away from people was fine.

ANd at least last year she had schoolwork to keep her busy part of the day. Without the virtual work to do, this year quarantine would be even more boring.

I think allowing a kid in quarantine to be outside in the fresh air makes tons of sense. Letting her play with other kids doesn't, though. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, vonfirmath said:

FYI when my daughter was quarantined last year (January) I did allow her to go outside. Even on her bike once. But she was instructed to keep her distance. So knocking on friends' doors would not have happened. And we mostly kept to our backyard. But I also would not have thought being quarantined meant being locked inside the house, not allowed outside. Outside, fresh air, away from people was fine.

Of course kids should go outside! I don’t begrudge anyone fresh air, time outside.  I hope my post didn’t come across otherwise.
 

I wondered, though, if any school districts have guidelines re: what kids should be doing while in quarantine.
 

In the case of my local neighbor kid …It’s the knocking on doors, not just ours, and playing with little kids that I find … counterproductive to “quarantine.” Nerf gun fights with the pre school crowd during school hours, popping into Sheetz to grab a soda, hanging with teens to play basketball after school. Seems counterproductive to helping the school stop transmission since he’s hanging with kids from school, once they are home, and the younger crowd is part of our school district, too.
 

This is a kid who lives with his grandma. She has always, since he was maybe 6 yr old, espoused the parenting style of “Outside! Don’t come back till mealtime!” He knows the neighborhood routines. Saturdays he’d knock on our door at 9 for pancakes, and so on. He just goes house to house, knocking till someone can play. He will play with anyone, and he’s a sweet, sweet kid. He’s out all day, all over the place, and doesn’t stand back when knocking on those doors, either. None of that is a big deal, we all love this kid. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

FYI when my daughter was quarantined last year (January) I did allow her to go outside. Even on her bike once. But she was instructed to keep her distance. So knocking on friends' doors would not have happened. And we mostly kept to our backyard. But I also would not have thought being quarantined meant being locked inside the house, not allowed outside. Outside, fresh air, away from people was fine.

 

ANd at least last year she had schoolwork to keep her busy part of the day. Without the virtual work to do, this year quarantine would be even more boring.

Exactly.  Quarantined doesn't mean sick.  I had my kid tested twice during quarantine.  She did not have Covid.  Her sister continued going to school.  Even had I wanted to keep sister home, she would have been truant since she was neither quarantined nor sick.  And she would not have had an excuse for late work, missed tests, etc.

My kid was not allowed to attend any sports etc. while quarantined.  We canceled their health appointments, music lessons, and whatever else in-person we had on the calendar.  But being out walking the dog, bike riding, etc. was encouraged.  Fighting Covid includes keeping our kids as healthy as we can.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Spryte said:

Of course kids should go outside! I don’t begrudge anyone fresh air, time outside.  I hope my post didn’t come across otherwise.
 

I wondered, though, if any school districts have guidelines re: what kids should be doing while in quarantine.
 

In the case of my local neighbor kid …It’s the knocking on doors, not just ours, and playing with little kids that I find … counterproductive to “quarantine.” Nerf gun fights with the pre school crowd during school hours, popping into Sheetz to grab a soda, hanging with teens to play basketball after school. Seems counterproductive to helping the school stop transmission since he’s hanging with kids from school, once they are home, and the younger crowd is part of our school district, too.
 

This is a kid who lives with his grandma. She has always, since he was maybe 6 yr old, espoused the parenting style of “Outside! Don’t come back till mealtime!” He knows the neighborhood routines. Saturdays he’d knock on our door at 9 for pancakes, and so on. He just goes house to house, knocking till someone can play. He will play with anyone, and he’s a sweet, sweet kid. He’s out all day, all over the place, and doesn’t stand back when knocking on those doors, either. None of that is a big deal, we all love this kid. 

Maybe he doesn't understand, or maybe he's had a negative test.

I don't know that the school advises what kids should do during quarantine.  I suspect they have their hands full managing what happens on school property, especially during an outbreak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, SKL said:

Maybe he doesn't understand, or maybe he's had a negative test.

I don't know that the school advises what kids should do during quarantine.  I suspect they have their hands full managing what happens on school property, especially during an outbreak.

He may not understand. He’s not a kid-kid, he’s in 10th grade so he’s old enough but his grandparents don’t think Covid is a big deal, or even real, so I think his understanding of quarantine is different due to family culture.

But yeh, being outside and exercise, fresh air - all that makes sense. Congregating with other kids - not so much, to me.

If schools aren’t giving any recommendations or guidance about quarantine (like, say, outside is ok, outside with random people not in your household is not) though, then that answers my question. His family is such that they may or may not listen to guidance anyway.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, SKL said:

Maybe he doesn't understand, or maybe he's had a negative test.

I don't know that the school advises what kids should do during quarantine.  I suspect they have their hands full managing what happens on school property, especially during an outbreak.

Our school didn't tell us what to do/not do during quarantine. Just to come get the kiddo immediately and they could not come back to school until X date. And to let them know if kiddo came up positive on a COVID test.

 

She didn't go to her clubs, church meeting, church, or shopping with me while quarantined but I did go out shopping and occasionally brought home fast food for lunch, etc.

(We also didn't have grandparents help. Just in case. Though they were helping with virtual school when it happened otherwise)

 

Edited by vonfirmath
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ETA: She was invited to a birthday party that was supposed to happen during this time -- another kid in her class, also quarantined. Obviously the party did not happen. On the day of the other girl's birthday, we walked over to their house and put her gift on the doorstep. Then we stood at the sidewalk while the girl came out and unwrapped her gift and they waved at each other.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I'm truly sorry and understand (and share) your fury.

Reform?

Bill

Been there (Reform), done that. Got the T shirt. I am edging closer to disengaging from communal life. I hold several community posts but it's getting harder to be a representative of a community that I don't think to be acting correctly according to Jewish law much less secular mores.

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, YaelAldrich said:

Been there (Reform), done that. Got the T shirt. I am edging closer to disengaging from communal life. I hold several community posts but it's getting harder to be a representative of a community that I don't think to be acting correctly according to Jewish law much less secular mores.

Really sorry you are dealing with this. I understand completely.

In my little (highly Jewish) corner of LA, I've been really impressed with the response to Covid among the Reform synagogues.

Conservative, not bad--but could be better.

And I'll leave the rest unsaid. Disappointing.

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Spryte besides the obvious vaccine and protective mask you could try xclear nasal spray and use mouthwash.  My kids who are too young to vax (but not high risk) can do some limited outdoor things with other kids around.  I have them use a couple squirts of xclear beforehand and use Listerine afterward.  

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kid started school today. This year we seem to have a weird mix of precaution/mitigation mixed with a large dose of "let 'er rip, we've done all we can do" going on. Masks and assigned seating are mandated for all elementary kids & schools and for all ages on buses with mixed age groups.

But, the high school is 'back to normal', except with a rolling block (two 2.5 hr. classes/day) schedule vs. five 1-hr. classes/day). Lunch is one hour, wide-open so all grade levels will mix and mingle. All extra-currs back on this year. There were no school-run extra-currs last year at all. The block schedule is supposed to help with contact tracing, but if lunch and before & after school is a free-for-all, I'm not sure I understand the point. 🤷🏻‍♀️
 

We had a lot more gov. mandates and mitigation measures in place last year and the school district was more cautious with hybrid online + in-class learning. Our numbers were lower then than they are now.

I guess we'll see how this experiment goes. 


 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

What have the Conservative ones been like? Our synagogue is Conservative, and it's been all virtual, which has been fine... but they seem pretty flakey about this year's stuff so far. 

The big Conservative synagogue has reopened. They are also streaming. I believe those attending are supposed to be vaccinated (if they are over 12). Are they checking vaccination status? Not too sure about that.

The school (like public schools) is open.

I assume masking is going on. Seems like typical levels of "caution" relative to the general community, as far as I can see. Not bad.

The big Reform synagogue--which went virtual almost immediately--is also open and will be having High Holy Day services in person, however they are actively encouraging people to participate remotely, while having a strict document proof of vaccination check pre-authorization for the holidays. Major messaging on the ethics of stopping the spread. 

A difference of degrees.

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Syllieann said:

@Spryte besides the obvious vaccine and protective mask you could try xclear nasal spray and use mouthwash.  My kids who are too young to vax (but not high risk) can do some limited outdoor things with other kids around.  I have them use a couple squirts of xclear beforehand and use Listerine afterward.  

Could you please let me know why you do this before they go out? I am interested in trying it as well ...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, mathnerd said:

Could you please let me know why you do this before they go out? I am interested in trying it as well ...

There is some limited in vitro data to show that one of the ingredients inactivates the virus while another ingredient makes it more difficult for it to "stick" to the mucous membrane.  It's been on the market and widely used for allergies so we know it is safe, thus I don't mind giving it a try even if there's not lots of data.  My hope would be that it makes it less likely that virus that did happen to find its way in would result in infection.  It wasn't previously classed as a drug , so the fda can't approve it, but they are working on changing that.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7645297/

https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04858620

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Syllieann said:

There is some limited in vitro data to show that one of the ingredients inactivates the virus while another ingredient makes it more difficult for it to "stick" to the mucous membrane.  It's been on the market and widely used for allergies so we know it is safe, thus I don't mind giving it a try even if there's not lots of data.  My hope would be that it makes it less likely that virus that did happen to find its way in would result in infection.  It wasn't previously classed as a drug , so the fda can't approve it, but they are working on changing that.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7645297/

https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04858620

Thank you!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Syllieann said:

There is some limited in vitro data to show that one of the ingredients inactivates the virus while another ingredient makes it more difficult for it to "stick" to the mucous membrane.  It's been on the market and widely used for allergies so we know it is safe, thus I don't mind giving it a try even if there's not lots of data.  My hope would be that it makes it less likely that virus that did happen to find its way in would result in infection.  It wasn't previously classed as a drug , so the fda can't approve it, but they are working on changing that.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7645297/

https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04858620

We use this product at our house sometimes, so I see no harm in giving it a shot either. Our doc has recommended it when we are sick with sinus junk, prior to Covid. I feel like she may have mentioned it has an effect on biofilms of other bugs. Can’t recall exactly now, it was 2019 or so when she suggested it. I recall reading later that it was showing some promise re: Covid, and getting some extra because we like to have it on hand - it’s a go-to when we get sick anyway, and I was afraid there could be a run on it. It’s one of those things I have in the toolkit in case we get sick, but I had not thought of using it preventatively. Thanks.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our superintendant sent out a voice mail and email to everyone this evening.  He noted that we have over 1% of our student body out in quarantine right now and would people please mask their kids.  He noted that masking will reduce/prevent quarantines, and he implied that if things get bad enough, we might end up virtual schooling again.

From what I've seen in our public elementary schools (photos, videos), most kids seem to be masking, but not all.  Not sure about middle school.  High school is mostly unmasked as far as I can tell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as the comparison to last year (less mitigation this year), recall that the point was really never to protect the majority of kids, but to protect people at high risk whom they might interact with - mainly older adults.  Now that the vast majority of at-risk adults can be vaccinated if they want to (and there is an all-virtual option for those who are still at risk), there isn't as much concern about keeping cases extremely low.  I think the main concern now is to hopefully not overwhelm hospitals.

Right now we're not doing awful, but I still think Delta will cover a lot more ground here before it leaves us.

In our state, since the beginning of this pandemic, there have been a total of 7 children who died with Covid, of which only 2 were between ages 5 and 17.  The cumulative number of school-aged children hospitalized to date is about 900 (over 21 months).  The weekly number hospitalized has increased recently, but is still less than the peak in December 2020, and seems to be decreasing for now.

I don't know what the threshold may be beyond which the school system goes virtual.  As I told my kids, if it goes virtual, oh well.  We'll deal.  At least now they know how to use the technology and stuff.  Hopefully, if it does go virtual, it won't be for super long.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our local district just announced that they are closing down today and tomorrow.  With the holiday on Monday, that gives five days with no school to may e break the Covid cycle and then they are mandating masks for two weeks.  A larger school in our area announced virtual learning for the next two weeks.  

So far the small school we play sports at it is doing ok with their anti-mask policy.  Rumor is that one of the varsity volleyball girls has Covid but she hasn't been at any games or practices since school started last week so I'm assuming she was sick prior to that.  

My 12yo can get her first vaccine shot tomorrow!  Yay!  She is playing volleyball so I feel like we are in a race between Delta and her birthday but we didn't have the heart to pull her off the team.

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just saw pictures from the first day of school in my city.   Masks must not be required in the schools because at the high school most of the people didn't have a mask. I counted 10 kids in the freshman class.  Then all the upper classmen where at the elementary schools with no masks.  Kids sitting knee to knee at lunch indoors.  No social distance.  Kids playing sports indoors and no masks.  I can't believe it.  I am so upset, but also so sad.  My kids are not in school but man I wish they could be doing all those things acting like it is 2019. 

  • Sad 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

More school districts in TN are closing because of staff shortages. I think the count is up to 18 districts now.  Plus a whole bunch more individual schools.  Apparently a lot of bus drivers and cafeteria workers, in particular, are out sick.

The state education commissioner has consented to allow individual classrooms or schools, but not entire districts, to go virtual.  This is a major concession from the current governor's administration.  However, so far all the reporting is that these districts are just shutting down completely until after Labor Day. (ETA:  I just read that the commissioner is granting some, not all, of these requests.)

TN is a very conservative, rural state and AFAIK outside of the cities schools (and school sports) across the state were in-person and operating normally last year.  Vaccines, masks, and other covid precautions are quite unpopular in most of the places that are currently closing schools, so it is very striking that they are taking such drastic measures. The situation must be just completely unworkable.

 

 

Edited by JennyD
  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some Ohio school districts are trying to pilot modified quarantine rules. 

https://www.fox19.com/2021/09/01/warren-county-schools-send-proposal-gov-dewine-change-quarantine-guidelines-students/

I am leery of false negatives letting kids come back to schools. The false negative rate for rapid testing is pretty high.

Students with masks or vaccinations (one or the other) are already not required to quarantine.  

  • Sad 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/1/2021 at 12:12 PM, Not_a_Number said:

Sorry, I mean that they did the experiment of not doing boosters on time.

We still don't know when "on time" is for boosters, so it's not like Israel had much choice. Back then, it wasn't clear if boosters would ever be required, and as the first to vaccinate, Israel was likely to always be the one to find out when that timeframe might be.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, ieta_cassiopeia said:

We still don't know when "on time" is for boosters, so it's not like Israel had much choice. Back then, it wasn't clear if boosters would ever be required, and as the first to vaccinate, Israel was likely to always be the one to find out when that timeframe might be.

Yes, I’m not saying they did something wrong, just that the experiment has been done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of DS's teachers just returned from a 2-week absence. Turns out his young kids caught covid and he caught it from them. Never heard anything official from the school; he told the students himself when he got back. Rumor has it that two cafeteria workers are also out with covid, but again, nothing official. I am wondering if they are using the "if everyone was properly masked then no one is a close contact" rationalization to not inform us of potential exposures. DS is vaxxed but AFAIK the school doesn't know which students are or aren't; they've never asked. Masks are required in our county school buildings.  However, when I went to Open House last week there were a couple of unmasked parents and no one said anything to them. 

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't expect the school to tell you who has Covid, because that is not allowed.  They can tell you your kid sat within 3 feet of someone who had Covid, and you get to do your own detective work to try to guess who it was.

I don't think it matters who.

Personally I am still trusting my kids' vaxes and their natural immune systems.  I know there have been cases at their school, but I have zero curiosity as to who those people are.  I'm glad they aren't going to be quarantined every time someone in the vicinity tests positive.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every single kindergarten teacher is out with Covid at a local elementary school.  No masks at school, of course. 

The school isn't relaying info to parents, either. The parents have a fb group where they share info, and that's how it came to light that ALL the kindy teachers were out.  

Edited by MissLemon
typo
  • Sad 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kid told me that someone on her soccer team has Covid, and everyone who is not vaccinated will be quarantined.  However, I have not heard anything from the school folks.  She might have the info wrong.  We'll see.  There was nothing scheduled from Friday through Monday anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm currently long term subbing in a collab Pre k class for 3-4 year old special needs students who mostly don't mask but cough and sneeze frequently. I mask, but have had problems with students not hearing me well due to the mask, so I removed the filter from my mask. Though I'm vaccinated, I'm fully expecting to get Covid this fall. We have had teachers out this year already (3 weeks in) and an SLP and one teacher I was in direct contact are out on quarantine. One ofthe 2 have Covid, but I'm not sure which one. The school isn't notifying anyone.

Has anyone seen this? She is also on FB under the name Your Local Epidemiologist and there are some interesting discussions there.

Pediatric hospitalizations: Some important news today

https%3A%2F%2Fbucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-43
 

Today we got two huge questions answered that we (epidemiologists, clinicians, and parents) have been anxiously waiting for…

  1. What are hospitalization rates across different pediatric age groups? Until now, pediatric hospitalizations have only been reported as <18 years, which is not helpful.

  2. Is Delta more severe for kids compared to previous variants? We know that Delta is more severe for adults. But is it for kids? Could that be explaining the high number of pediatric hospitalizations across the US?

The CDC just published a paper (50 minutes ago, you’re welcome) using data from the Coronavirus Disease 2019–Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET). This is a database of COVID-19–associated hospitalizations in 99 counties across 14 states. Scientists looked at pediatric hospitalizations from March 1, 2020–August 14, 2021. What did they find?

  • The cumulative number of COVID19 hospitalization was 49.7 per 100,000 kids

    • Rates were highest among children aged 0–4 years (69.2 per 100,000) and adolescents aged 12–17 years (63.7 per 100,000)

    • Rates were lowest among children aged 5–11 years (24.0 per 100,000)

  • Among pediatric COVID19 hospitalizations, 26.5% were admitted to an ICU, 6.1% required ventilation, and 0.7% of the children died

The rate of hospitalizations has dramatically increased in the past month

  • Pediatric hospitalization rates are 5 times higher in August compared to June

    • The biggest increase was among 0–4 year olds, with a COVID-19 hospitalization rate 10 times higher in August compared to June

  • The hospitalization rate among unvaccinated adolescents (aged 12–17 years) was 10 times higher than that among fully vaccinated adolescents

The figure shows increasing COVID-19 hospitalizations in children and adolescents since the Delta variant. COVID-19–associated weekly hospitalizations per 100,000 children and adolescents,* by age group — COVID-NET, 14 states,† March 1, 2020–August 14, 2021 (3-week smoothed running averages)§

But, this isn’t necessarily because Delta is more severe

To assess severity of Delta compared to previous variants, hospitalizations were split up into two time periods: before Delta (March 1, 2020–June 19, 2021) and after Delta (June 20–July 31, 2021).

  • The rate in which kids died, were admitted to the ICU, needed oxygen, or ventilation was not statistically different during Delta compared to before Delta:

    • Before Delta: 26.5% were admitted to an ICU, 6.1% required ventilation, and 0.7% died

    • After Delta: 23.2% were admitted to an ICU, 9.8% required ventilation, and 1.8% died

So, Delta is not likely more severe for kids. Increasing pediatric hospitalization rates are due to high transmission in the community.

Our vaccine wall for kids is largely working in states that have one

The CDC also published a second paper this afternoon, but it’s less surprising. This study looked at hospital records across states to see whether state-level vaccination rates impacted pediatric hospitalizations. In other words, does the vaccine immunity wall help kids? Drum roll…

  • Emergency department visits and hospital admissions are higher in states with lower population vaccination coverage

  • Emergency department visits and hospital admissions are lower in states with higher vaccination coverage

This figure shows increased child and adolescent hospitalizations in states with low vaccination levels.

Bottom Line: Pediatric hospitalizations have dramatically increased in the past month. Yes, the media is accurately portraying the situation on the ground. And, hospitalizations have increased the most for 0-4 year olds. Importantly, this isn’t because Delta is likely more severe, it’s because we are transmitting Delta in the community and our kids aren’t protected. Your decision not to get a vaccine or implement public health measures in schools or the community is directly impacting the health of kids.

Please do your part this Labor Day weekend.

Love, YLE

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, wilrunner said:

I'm currently long term subbing in a collab Pre k class for 3-4 year old special needs students who mostly don't mask but cough and sneeze frequently. I mask, but have had problems with students not hearing me well due to the mask, so I removed the filter from my mask. Though I'm vaccinated, I'm fully expecting to get Covid this fall.

Can't you wear a mic?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do wonder if the CDC took into account whether schools are back in session or not, when comparing hospitalization numbers in high and low vaccination areas...schools tend to start earlier in the south, and vaccination rates tend to be lower in the south (and places with high vaccination rates also tend to be the places with the most safety measures in place when schools do open). So what happened in August seems less telling than what will happen in September or October, when schools are open everywhere. I certainly hope the "vaccine immunity wall" holds up, but I just don't know that there are enough people vaccinated ANYWHERE right now (and there won't be until kids can be vaccinated). 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, wilrunner said:

. Scientists looked at pediatric hospitalizations from March 1, 2020–August 14, 2021. What did they find?

  • The cumulative number of COVID19 hospitalization was 49.7 per 100,000 kids

    • Rates were highest among children aged 0–4 years (69.2 per 100,000) and adolescents aged 12–17 years (63.7 per 100,000)

    • Rates were lowest among children aged 5–11 years (24.0 per 100,000)

  • Among pediatric COVID19 hospitalizations, 26.5% were admitted to an ICU, 6.1% required ventilation, and 0.7% of the children died

 

To assess severity of Delta compared to previous variants, hospitalizations were split up into two time periods: before Delta (March 1, 2020–June 19, 2021) and after Delta (June 20–July 31, 2021).

  • The rate in which kids died, were admitted to the ICU, needed oxygen, or ventilation was not statistically different during Delta compared to before Delta:

    • Before Delta: 26.5% were admitted to an ICU, 6.1% required ventilation, and 0.7% died

    • After Delta: 23.2% were admitted to an ICU, 9.8% required ventilation, and 1.8% died

So, Delta is not likely more severe for kids. Increasing pediatric hospitalization rates are due to high transmission in the community.

 

 

I keep seeing this, but don’t understand why this is interpreted as not being more severe. Are the numbers too low to reach significance? It seems they would be high enough, but I haven’t looked at the original. Hospitalization looks the same, but ICU looks ~30% higher, and worse, death appears to be more than twice the rate as before. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, KSera said:

I keep seeing this, but don’t understand why this is interpreted as not being more severe. Are the numbers too low to reach significance? It seems they would be high enough, but I haven’t looked at the original. Hospitalization looks the same, but ICU looks ~30% higher, and worse, death appears to be more than twice the rate as before. 

I took it to mean that it was as severe before but it didn’t show before because overall numbers were lower. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I took it to mean that it was as severe before but it didn’t show before because overall numbers were lower. 

I took that the same overall, but they are saying that while the absolute numbers have increased due to larger numbers, the rate is the same, thus it’s not more severe. What I’m saying, is that while hospitalization rates look essentially the same to me, the ICU and especially death rates appear on the surface to be higher to me. Significantly higher, IMO, in the case of deaths. And since that is a rate per population, the current higher numbers doesn’t account for it.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, KSera said:

I took that the same overall, but they are saying that while the absolute numbers have increased due to larger numbers, the rate is the same, thus it’s not more severe. What I’m saying, is that while hospitalization rates look essentially the same to me, the ICU and especially death rates appear on the surface to be higher to me. Significantly higher, IMO, in the case of deaths. And since that is a rate per population, the current higher numbers doesn’t account for it.

I wonder if (and I can't remember which thread this was in) the talk about how subsequent infections can be worse, could be a factor?  If kids have been getting asymptomatic infections prior but then got reinfected, then they might then end up in the hospital and ICU. . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It only took 3 days, and there's a positive student case at my school. 150 kids total. Rural-ish Maine.

Geez!

Oh, and none of the kids need to quarantine, despite being close contacts, because they were wearing masks all the time.... except when they're eating lunch in their classrooms, and snack in their classroom... because they were 6 feet apart during that time. 😬 🙄

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...