Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

I am looking for a Spanish 1 curriculum for my daughter who will be in 10th grade. I've been researching and searching through this forum and feel so overwhelmed. I have been looking at Lifepac, Breaking the Barrier and Avancemos (although I'm confused about this one as I saw things about it being discontinued and then posts that seemed like it wasn't?). I am looking for something easy to use and covers the basics, while still being enough for a high school credit. I'm not necessarily looking for something rigorous as no one in our home has any prior experience with Spanish. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Avancemos is not going to work well if you have no prior experience with Spanish unless you intend to study ahead of your kids. There will be assignments that are open ended and you need to know enough to be able to correct grammatical and pronunciation errors. If you really want that curriculum, Kolbe Academy has a grading option that you could use.

Hopefully someone can comment on the others.

I think BJU might have a Spanish with videos?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cintinative said:

Avancemos is not going to work well if you have no prior experience with Spanish unless you intend to study ahead of your kids. There will be assignments that are open ended and you need to know enough to be able to correct grammatical and pronunciation errors. If you really want that curriculum, Kolbe Academy has a grading option that you could use.

Hopefully someone can comment on the others.

I think BJU might have a Spanish with videos?

 

That is helpful to know. I am planning on studying ahead of her.

1 hour ago, Farrar said:

I think the first core question is whether you can teach Spanish, because if you can't, I would strong suggest a class and not a curriculum.

I am proficient in Latin, so I do feel comfortable teaching her Spanish. We are taking the curriculum route as we can't afford a class option.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried Breaking the Barrier with my oldest and it was an epic disaster. Part of it could be that he is just not that awesome with foreign language and I'm not fluent in Spanish. At all. We ended up with him taking 2 agonizing years of Latin (which I am very familiar with). My youngest (9th grade) will be taking Spanish this year via the Homeschool Spanish Academy. I have no prior experience with them but have heard rave reviews so my fingers are crossed. Homeschool Spanish Academy offers the options of monthly payments and seems very reasonable for what you get. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For High School Spanish 1, I would begin with Getting Started with Spanish, doing 2, maybe 3 lessons a day, at least in the beginning. (The lessons are very short and easy in the beginning).  I would then move on to Lifepacs, trying to get through 2 - 3 of the Spanish 1 Lifepacs, and I would feel good about giving a Spanish 1 credit for that.

I agonized about Spanish with my older son, and whether or not he learned enough to succeed at college Spanish.  In his Spanish 1 class at college, it was half cultural studies/half introductory Spanish, and it was soooo easy for him after Lifepacs.  Way less was covered in his college Spanish 1 class  than what we covered in our homeschool Spanish 1 with the Spanish 1 Lifepac program.  He made near 100% in his college class, and IMO he was not a good Spanish student, lol.  For college Spanish 2, it got a bit harder and more intense, but it still didn't cover much more than what is covered in the entire series of 10 Spanish Lifepacs for High School Spanish 1.  The Spanish 1 Lifepac series covers a LOT of Spanish, way more than most high school students can comfortably learn well in a year.  The only thing that I wish was included in the Spanish 1 series is the preterite.  Instead of covering preterite, the Lifepac series spends a lot of time in the last few Lifepacs on object pronouns -- direct object, indirect object, preposition, and then the dreaded double object pronouns.  I think some of that time would have been better spent on introducing the preterite, which Lifepacs don't cover till the Spanish 2 series. 

FWIW, my older son only went as far as the 6th booklet in the Spanish 1 Lifepac series, and I gave him high school credit for both Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 because he put the time in.  He didn't care for Spanish and wasn't a good student, lol, and the grades I gave him were B and C.  In college, he was required to take college Spanish 1 & 2, and he made an A and a B in those courses -- I feel his high school Spanish adequately prepared him for college Spanish.  

Edited by Serenade
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, Serenade said:

For High School Spanish 1, I would begin with Getting Started with Spanish, doing 2, maybe 3 lessons a day, at least in the beginning. (The lessons are very short and easy in the beginning).  I would then move on to Lifepacs, trying to get through 2 - 3 of the Spanish 1 Lifepacs, and I would feel good about giving a Spanish 1 credit for that.

I agonized about Spanish with my older son, and whether or not he learned enough to succeed at college Spanish.  In his Spanish 1 class at college, it was half cultural studies/half introductory Spanish, and it was soooo easy for him after Lifepacs.  Way less was covered in his college Spanish 1 class  than what we covered in our homeschool Spanish 1 with the Spanish 1 Lifepac program.  He made near 100% in his college class, and IMO he was not a good Spanish student, lol.  For college Spanish 2, it got a bit harder and more intense, but it still didn't cover much more than what is covered in the entire series of 10 Spanish Lifepacs for High School Spanish 1.  The Spanish 1 Lifepac series covers a LOT of Spanish, way more than most high school students can comfortably learn well in a year.  The only thing that I wish was included in the Spanish 1 series is the preterite.  Instead of covering preterite, the Lifepac series spends a lot of time in the last few Lifepacs on object pronouns -- direct object, indirect object, preposition, and then the dreaded double object pronouns.  I think some of that time would have been better spent on introducing the preterite, which Lifepacs don't cover till the Spanish 2 series. 

FWIW, my older son only went as far as the 6th booklet in the Spanish 1 Lifepac series, and I gave him high school credit for both Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 because he put the time in.  He didn't care for Spanish and wasn't a good student, lol, and the grades I gave him were B and C.  In college, he was required to take college Spanish 1 & 2, and he made an A and a B in those courses -- I feel his high school Spanish adequately prepared him for college Spanish.  

This is incredibly helpful. Thank you so much for sharing!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have researched and searched for the perfect, affordable, beginning Spanish course. It doesn't exist. 

I have the Avancemos textbook but found it pretty unusable *for us* (I have a small degree of Spanish knowledge, but I couldn't make that text useful). 

I agree with the recommendation for ULAT. It feels a bit overwhelming at first because it's immersive, but that eases over time. And the website/tech is a bit off-putting (old school) but the price is soooo reasonable (dare I say, CHEAP!) I haven't found anything I like as well.

We supplemented with some vocab-based workbooks. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...