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Allowing (encouraging) your teen to have s*x


DawnM
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Ok, I am positive I grabbed your attention!

No, not my me or my kid....🤣

I am just a little surprised.   Some friends of ours have a teen daughter.   She is bringing her new relationship on a family trip and the parents are allowing them to stay in their own hotel room together.   they are even paying for it.

ETA:  To me, this fact didn't matter, but I will add it into the first post.....teens are 16 and 17 years old.   Dating a few weeks.   Parents have some money but are not rich, solid middle class.   I find their daughter to be spoiled and whiney, but that is just my opinion.   They tend to dote on her.   so, I don't see any strain in their relationship.   

Am I the only one who feels this just isn't quite right?   Or am I just an old fogie?

Edited by DawnM
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I knew some girls at school whose mothers behaved like that. I assumed those women had issues with popularity when they were teens. 🤷‍♀️

I'm of the opinion that anyone old enough for a double bed is old enough to purchase it themselves.

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2 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

I knew some girls at school whose mothers behaved like that. I assumed those women had issues with popularity when they were teens. 🤷‍♀️

I'm of the opinion that anyone old enough for a double bed is old enough to purchase it themselves.

Amen. 

(and if you are not ready to afford a pregnancy, etc, I'm not financing your sex acts)

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This isn’t my cup of tea, but I have seen a number of families welcome teen bf/gf along on trips. I see it much more with college kids.

Generally:

 1. The family has significant wealth and having the teen occupied frees up the parents to do what they want OR the family has a long history of teen relationships turning into marriages/cohabitating/babies by age 18

2. Both sets of parents acknowledge sex has been happening and they can’t control their teens’ sexuality and 

3. sometimes there is a degree of teen refusing to travel unless bf/gf coming along and this is a concession in an already strained relationship

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No, you're not an old fogie!  I doubt too many parents would be okay with that.  I did have a couple friends in high school though whose moms got them birth control pills and actually invited their boyfriends to stay the night.  They were moms who had a lot of issues themselves and wanted their daughters to be "popular."  These friends later spent years in counseling recovering from mothers who were messed up.

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6 minutes ago, prairiewindmomma said:

This isn’t my cup of tea, but I have seen a number of families welcome teen bf/gf along on trips. I see it much more with college kids.

Generally:

 1. The family has significant wealth and having the teen occupied frees up the parents to do what they want OR the family has a long history of teen relationships turning into marriages/cohabitating/babies by age 18

2. Both sets of parents acknowledge sex has been happening and they can’t control their teens’ sexuality and 

3. sometimes there is a degree of teen refusing to travel unless bf/gf coming along and this is a concession in an already strained relationship

Huh, I don't see any of these things to be true in this particular situation, but it might be true in other people's situations.

Family is not rich.   No history of early marriages.   New relationship, like very new.  And the teen doesn't have a strained relationship.   They are going on a college visit tour for her while they are there, so she wanted to go.

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I allowed my then 16 yr old dd to have her same-age g/friend stay over in the same bed.

17 yr old has his same-age  g/friend stay over. 

I don't think I have popularity issues, we're not rich, and I don't feel like I'm financially responsible for anyone's sex acts. 

Idk. Its kinda just pragmatic. I just don't get why I'm meant to have an issue with it at 16+. I suppose if I had issues with the relationship itself I'd be less chill. 

If we were going away, yeah, of course I'd invite g/friend. And it would be weird to put her in a different room given she sleeps in ds' room here. 

 

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20 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

I knew some girls at school whose mothers behaved like that. I assumed those women had issues with popularity when they were teens. 🤷‍♀️

I'm of the opinion that anyone old enough for a double bed is old enough to purchase it themselves.

Darn I wish I could like your posts!

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10 minutes ago, DawnM said:

Huh, I don't see any of these things to be true in this particular situation, but it might be true in other people's situations.

Family is not rich.   No history of early marriages.   New relationship, like very new.  And the teen doesn't have a strained relationship.   They are going on a college visit tour for her while they are there, so she wanted to go.

That is odd.

The scenario I see is usually teen bringing an established relationship person along on a cruise or a trip to a destination resort.

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Teens will have sex. I'd rather they do it in the safety and privacy of their own home rather than in a car in some lovers lane or behind a dumpster in the park. Having to hide from the parents doesn't create safe situations. 

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I'm generally sex-positive, but I would not be paying for that or even allowing it in someone underage.

DH has a firm "not in my house" rule that I think is a bit hypocritical but I keep my mouth shut because it's really important to him.

I knew a family like this that I nannied for a bit in college and lets just say...  CPS eventually intervened and insisted they take parenting classes before the youngest was out of elementary school.  Bad decisions all around.

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6 minutes ago, Lecka said:

Maybe they think he is a good catch and want to move things forward.

I think it is just so inappropriate. 

Why? 

I'm super curious. It's like my brain is missing the bit that tells me why it's inappropriate. I'm strict about some things, but with older teens who have had decent sex and relationship ed, I truly don't get what's inappropriate. 

ETA I get why if you are a family who doesn't believe in sex before marriage..but if you're a secular family who doesn't have particular views about sex being linked with marriage, why would it be inappropriate to allow older teens a sex life in their home? 

 

Edited by Melissa Louise
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5 minutes ago, Melissa Louise said:

Why? 

I'm super curious. It's like my brain is missing the bit that tells me why it's inappropriate. I'm strict about some things, but with older teens who have had decent sex and relationship ed, I truly don't get what's inappropriate. 

ETA I get why if you are a family who doesn't believe in sex before marriage..but if you're a secular family who doesn't have particular views about sex being linked with marriage, why would it be inappropriate to allow older teens a sex life in their home? 

 

This. I don't have a religion that considers premarital sex a sin. I don't attach any moral value to a person's consensual sex life ( person being above the age of consent) in a committed relationship. Nor does the latter have any negative character implications.

( Despite my lose morals, both my young adults are in year 5 with their respective partners)

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I would probably invite gf/bf depending on the trip we occasionally invite good friends.  Room arrangements would be the same as all family trips squeezed into the smallest room possible because we are cheap and don't spend much time in the hotel.

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4 minutes ago, regentrude said:

This. I don't have a religion that considers premarital sex a sin. I don't attach any moral value to a person's consensual sex life ( person being above the age of consent) in a committed relationship. Nor does the latter have any negative character implications.

( Despite my lose morals, both my young adults are in year 5 with their respective partners)

Oh well, at least I'm not the only one with loose morals 🙂

I don't mean to be obtuse. I just don't understand. I would have to fake concern I don't feel to fit I to the majority view on this. 

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1 minute ago, regentrude said:

This. I don't have a religion that considers premarital sex a sin. I don't attach any moral value to a person's consensual sex life ( person being above the age of consent) in a committed relationship. Nor does the latter have any negative character implications.

( Despite my lose morals, both my young adults are in year 5 with their respective partners)

Yes, same. I agree with you and @Melissa Louise.

 

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1 hour ago, DawnM said:

Ok, I am positive I grabbed your attention!

No, not my me or my kid....🤣

I am just a little surprised.   Some friends of ours have a teen daughter.   She is bringing her new relationship on a family trip and the parents are allowing them to stay in their own hotel room together.   they are even paying for it.

Am I the only one who feels this just isn't quite right?   Or am I just an old fogie?

I’m right there with you. And if I was the boyfriend’s parent, he wouldn’t be going on that trip. 
 

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I am a person who considers premarital sex "a sin" -- for people who are committed to Christian sexual ethics. If my child is committed to Christian sexual ethics, and they desire my support as part of their Christian community, I would certainly make an effort to help and support a teen couple in sleeping apart even if they were travelling with my family.

However, there are many other people who don't have sexuality conceptualized as "a sin issue" -- nor do they consider teens abstaining (or not) to be an ethical issue. Some (not all) of these people still consider high-school aged teens young enough to be significantly negatively impacted by the intensity of a sexual relationship with a gf/bf. Many parents stand by the principle of delaying sexual activity because they see it as an unhealthy choice for teens below a certain age, or lacking certain markers of maturity, or whose relationship lacks a sense of intimacy, stability, or health.

If my teens don't end up sharing my Christian sexual ethics -- I'm not going to blame them or pressure them to do so. But I am going to fall back on the core idea that sex makes things very complicated in relationships, and young relationships are not usually ready for those repercussions. Also, no matter how careful you are, conception is always a possibility. My counsel is delay: whether for religious reasons of for practical ones.

If we were talking about someone in their 20's I'll feel differently, I'm sure. At 16, this is where I stand.

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I think that allowing your teen to have sex, in your house is one thing.  I think setting  up a situation where they are rooming together night after night where one is dependent on the other (because their parents provided transport) is something different.  I feel like it could easily become a situation where it was harder to enforce boundaries that someone wanted to enforce.

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19 minutes ago, Melissa Louise said:

Conception isn't always a possibility - waving over here, Mom of a gay kid, ahem! 

You're right. I apologize. That was very heteronormative of me.

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Did I miss the post where it states if the teen is legally an adult or a minor? A college visit tour could be either one depending on how old the teen was when they started kindy.

I agree that if the parent doesn't see it was a sin issue, and/or they do but recognize legal adulthood as the time the teen takes on decision making, then they would step back and not try to control such things. If the teen is a minor then I do think it's more complicated.  And approve or disapprove aren't the only possibilities.  There's also a neutral/not my place to decide option.

I know it's hard for a lot of religious parents to accept the idea that their children may not share the parent's convictions when they reach adulthood.  It's especially hard for some subsets of homeschoolers, but reality is what it is.  We don't get to conform reality to our personal preferences all the time, sometimes we just have to deal it as is, even though we really don't like it. 

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How old are these teens? I would respond differently for a 14yo vs 19yo.

I have taken my (then) 14/15yo daughter's boyfriend on vacation with us many times. He had his own room in the house we were staying at and she stayed in my room. I didn't mind him being there and it was better for me that being stuck in a cabin for a week at a time with a lonely/moping teenager. I didn't really see it any different than taking a same sex friend with us. Just because they are a 'couple' doesn't change much to me. A close friend in high school was a closet gay. She had girl friends stay the night all the time and her mom was none-the-wiser.  Maybe that skews my idea of who to take on vacation a bit. LOL

At 19, the same daughter was married (different man) and lived a state away from home. They basically lived together at his house, and they shared a room in my house after she turned 18yo/graduated high school. I didn't give it much thought. They have been married 3 years and are rock solid, so it definitely didn't alter their relationship. 

 

Edited by Tap
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I don't think its a sin, but I would not be encouraging teen sex, so no bed sharing at my house.  I have watched many teens move way too quickly into a sexual relationship when they were too immature, and stay way too long because of it.  At 18-19, that might change (I got married at 19), but I think I will stick to age 21.  I would invite a boyfriend or girlfriend on some things,  but they wouldn't share a room.  I would not necessarily invite them on big family vacations unless it was a serious relationship.   I think a lot of it depends on the people involved and the specific relationship. 

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My parents were not wealthy and my siblings and I were allowed / encouraged to bring our serious boyfriends / girlfriends on vacation. It was great! We definitely didn't share beds or have private rooms, though. All of us shared the same views on premarital sex so that helped tremendously, I'm sure. 

Minors sharing a room? Hard no from me, no apologies. It's not just the sin issue. Teen relationships (and especially breakups) are hard enough without the added complication of intimacy. 

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I dunno how I will feel when we get to this point.  On one hand, I would rather my kids not get intimate until they are ready to deal with any and all consequences in a mature way.  On the other hand, I would rather they not be afraid to tell me if they do decide to have sex.  Like most pragmatic moms, I'd rather make sure my kids have BC available whenever they do take that step.

But culturally, I feel like sex isn't something you do in your parents' house or equivalent, at least not until you're an official couple that they can introduce as such in the community.  (And even then ... I don't know!)

It's hard for me to imagine paying for a room for an unmarried teen couple to shack up in.

Not sure the age of these teens, but I hope the parents in the OP have made sure that whatever is happening is at least legal.

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Your post provides no context, sorry. Is the child 13 or 17? And I don’t know how you go from paying for a hotel room (of course parents pay for vacations, who else?) to “encouraging sex”. I know I don’t want my 17 year old in the same standard US hotel room with me, and sometimes we do take friends on vacation. I would have had a conversation with the other family though and if everyone is on the same page and there no legal consent issues well 🤷‍♀️

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3 hours ago, BaseballandHockey said:

I think that allowing your teen to have sex, in your house is one thing.  I think setting  up a situation where they are rooming together night after night where one is dependent on the other (because their parents provided transport) is something different.  I feel like it could easily become a situation where it was harder to enforce boundaries that someone wanted to enforce.

This is a good point re holidaying. 

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My son had a much younger girlfriend and her parents were like this.  I swear they made as many opportunities for their daughter to have sex with my son as possible.  I had to have a lot of serious discussions with my son.  Fortunately, she was old enough for legal consent (she was 16 and he was 19 when they started dating), but we talked a lot about birth control, responsibility, sexting because she was under 18, etc.  I was very relieved once she turned 18!  

I was really disturbed about the way her parents acted.  My son is a really good guy and I know they loved and trusted him, but they put their daughter in some really weird situations - like encouraging her to spend the night in his apartment in college that he shared with four other guys they didn't know.

 

 

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3 hours ago, bolt. said:

I am a person who considers premarital sex "a sin" -- for people who are committed to Christian sexual ethics. If my child is committed to Christian sexual ethics, and they desire my support as part of their Christian community, I would certainly make an effort to help and support a teen couple in sleeping apart even if they were travelling with my family.

However, there are many other people who don't have sexuality conceptualized as "a sin issue" -- nor do they consider teens abstaining (or not) to be an ethical issue. Some (not all) of these people still consider high-school aged teens young enough to be significantly negatively impacted by the intensity of a sexual relationship with a gf/bf. Many parents stand by the principle of delaying sexual activity because they see it as an unhealthy choice for teens below a certain age, or lacking certain markers of maturity, or whose relationship lacks a sense of intimacy, stability, or health.

If my teens don't end up sharing my Christian sexual ethics -- I'm not going to blame them or pressure them to do so. But I am going to fall back on the core idea that sex makes things very complicated in relationships, and young relationships are not usually ready for those repercussions. Also, no matter how careful you are, conception is always a possibility. My counsel is delay: whether for religious reasons of for practical ones.

If we were talking about someone in their 20's I'll feel differently, I'm sure. At 16, this is where I stand.

I agree. I have no issue with premarital relationships. In fact, I think in general it is better not to wait until marriage once someone is in a mature, committed relationship. But for me, there is a pretty big difference between 16 and 20. And if it was an heterosexual relationship, I’d want to make sure they are using two effective means of BC.

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I think that I can't even really have an opinion on this situation unless I know the actual age of the teen and the boyfriend. There's a big difference between adult teens - 18 and 19 - and minors, and for that matter between "nearly adults" at 16 and 17 and the ones even just a bit younger.

With that said, allowing sex - or at least acknowledging that there isn't much you can do to prevent it and that you'd rather they can come to you in a bad situation than being scared of whatever punishment or disappointment you'd dole out - isn't the same as encouraging it. And some of us don't really think of consensual sex as an issue where morality comes into it. I know with my kids our emphasis from the start was on consent and condoms, with a sidebar into "If you have sex and then you're not feeling it, it's okay to ditch the relationship". Like Busymom5, I've known adolescents and young adults to stick too long with a bad relationship because of The Sex Factor, but unlike her I took the opposite lesson - the kids I knew who did that tended to justify their decision to have premarital sex with the idea that "it's okay because we're sooooo in love", and then they were committed to that story in their own minds, so I didn't want to reinforce that association between sexual activity and love.  Do I think it's usually better to be in a committed relationship and love your partner? Sure. But that doesn't mean that people can't fall out of love, or straight up be lying to themselves from the get-go. I'd rather say that casual sex is a personal decision than make a bad logic loop for the kids.

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8 hours ago, Melissa Louise said:

Oh well, at least I'm not the only one with loose morals 🙂

I don't mean to be obtuse. I just don't understand. I would have to fake concern I don't feel to fit I to the majority view on this. 

I'm with you on this. If they are above the legal age of consent then I don't see it as an issue.

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I’m not taking a pro or anti stance. There are many factors I’d consider. And, fwiw, my teen girls are legal adults, and my teen boy (and young adult boy, for that matter) haven’t dated. AND, the oldest 3 have the ability to pay for their own rooms, as does dd’s boyfriend. Also, we are not entirely rich, and I’m somewhat cheap, but dh racks up points like crazy.

I can pretty much guarantee I wouldn’t do it for a teen under 16/17, or even bring a newish b/g-friend on a trip at all. But I have an 18yo in a nearly 2yr relationship, so we’d probably bring him one way or another. I am not in a position to have to make that decision though, so yay?

Dh would be more uncomfortable than me.

 

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I have seen this. My boys all dated throughout high school and I was nearly always the less permissive parent and the one having to say “no”.

I am totally against encouraging or allowing sex while they are in high school while recognizing it is beyond my control. So I am realistic but I would not put my teens with their significant others in a hotel room. However, my kids have dated people whose parents did allow it. It was a combination of thought processes. One was that it was totally OK, another was that it was inevitable so why fight it, and some parents just thought their kids would never have sex even when given the opportunity. I had one parent say to me once (about letting teens share a bed) “they are committed to waiting for marriage. They both signed the pledge”. (I guess the pledge was something they signed at some abstinence program at school). 
 

So while this wasn’t something we were okay with for our kids I can’t say that those that are okay with it are all of the same mind.
 

I feel like it is my responsibility to help my kids get to adulthood without the consequences of sexual relationships impacting their lives, while being available for support if they did make a choice with complications. I definitely felt relief when they got to adulthood and went off to college and this area of their lives was not my business anymore. For me the age for that is some combination of legal adulthood/moving out of my house/having other adult responsibilities etc. But the parents I least relate to are they ones who think their children would never  have sex no matter the opportunity. 

Edited by teachermom2834
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When I first visited my future parents in law, I was 26 and their previously-married son was 32. FIL-to-be asked that we sleep in separate rooms so as not to upset MIL-to-be. She wasn't a person of faith but she cared about appearances. That was absolutely fine and we agreed graciously. Just in case anyone might think that because premarital sex is a non-issue for me, I might be pushy on the subject.

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11 hours ago, DawnM said:

Ok, I am positive I grabbed your attention!

No, not my me or my kid....🤣

I am just a little surprised.   Some friends of ours have a teen daughter.   She is bringing her new relationship on a family trip and the parents are allowing them to stay in their own hotel room together.   they are even paying for it.

Am I the only one who feels this just isn't quite right?   Or am I just an old fogie?

Not right at all. And unfortunately, I’m dealing with mothers of 16 and 17-year-olds who are doing that now. As in, my son is on the receiving end of the invitations and there’s been less than honesty about whether or not there’s going to be parents present.

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I’m struggling with all the references to a teenage “significant other.”  To me SO means serious, adult, committed relationship, equivalent to marriage but you aren’t married for some personal or political reason.  Not a first or fifth boyfriend.  Teenagers aren’t capable of having a significant other. 

I say that knowing several couples in their 40’s who started dating their spouse in 7th or 8th grade. Even if you think you’re in love there are way too many unknowns when you are 13 or even 17 to call a boyfriend or girlfriend a significant other. 

Edited by Katy
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I am adamantly against purity culture and all the slut shaming of girls that brings with it. But I'm also not a fan of the attitude that teen sex is inevitable and NBD. My parents had this attitude and I wish they had not been so whatever about it. There are a lot of consequences to sex that have nothing to do with religion. Disease and pregnancy are obliviously the big ones. For me personally, the bigger issue was the emotional one. Too often girls are used for sex and discarded. I am here to support my kids being safe but I will not be encouraging them to have sex as minors like it is an act without consequences. Ultimately, it is their choice. I am not going to keep my kids locked up but I also won't put them in situations that encourage sex. 

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35 minutes ago, Katy said:

I’m struggling with all the references to a teenage “significant other.”  To me SO means serious, adult, committed relationship, equivalent to marriage but you aren’t married for some personal or political reason.  Not a first or fifth boyfriend.  Teenagers aren’t capable of having a significant other. 

I say that knowing several couples in their 40’s who started dating their spouse in 7th or 8th grade. Even if you think you’re in love there are way too many unknowns when you are 13 or even 17 to call a boyfriend or girlfriend a significant other. 

I agree that there is a big difference between a boyfriend/girlfriend and a SO but I do think older teens are capable of having a SO.  I was married when I was 19 and DH was definitely more than a boyfriend to me before we were officially married (we were living together before then).  

OTOH, my ds1 and his SO have been together almost 9 years now and living together for 6.  Seems like they are more than SO to each other since they are very obviously committed to each other and their future together, but they aren't married.  They make moving and career choices together and have both sacrificed some big things for the other.  

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Katy said:

I’m struggling with all the references to a teenage “significant other.”  To me SO means serious, adult, committed relationship, equivalent to marriage but you aren’t married for some personal or political reason.  Not a first or fifth boyfriend.  Teenagers aren’t capable of having a significant other. 

I say that knowing several couples in their 40’s who started dating their spouse in 7th or 8th grade. Even if you think you’re in love there are way too many unknowns when you are 13 or even 17 to call a boyfriend or girlfriend a significant other. 

That is not a connotation that I have for “significant other”.  In my experience it’s mainly used by older people who think “boyfriend” and “girlfriend” sound too juvenile, but there’s no implication of marriage-like commitment.

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It is really the detail that it is a new relationship I find inappropriate.

I think it’s possible there is some manipulation on the parent’s side that they are in favor of this relationship.

I think it’s possible maybe the guy is manipulative.

It seems like a red flag kind of thing of “why is this happening so quickly?”

If it’s something where they were best friends for years before dating, I would think that was different.

If the parents just happened to have frequent flier miles to use up and thought it would be nice, I would think that was different, too.  
 

But I still would think it was inappropriate overall.  I don’t think it’s a good idea to get a new relationship involved in a special family event.  
 

I don’t think it’s equivalent to a long-term relationship.  
 

That is something where I wouldn’t do it, but I don’t think it’s inappropriate.  
 

I really have seen some poor situations where parents sought to influence how much a boyfriend was liked, because that’s the boyfriend the parents liked.  
 

I have also seen some poor situations where a boyfriend made a great impression on parents, and then it kind-of cut out the daughter from being able to talk about certain things with her parents.  I think it can be manipulative.

 

Really I just think it seems way too early and then — why?  
 

Sure, I can see harmless/neutral reasons.

 

But if the parents are so casual, I think I can think they should be more aware of what I think are red flags for moving too quickly.  
 

 

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I am in the position of having some extended family who make quick first impressions and then think someone is the best person ever in the history of the world, while barely knowing them.

I am the only one who is saying “what about boundaries, what about getting to know people over time?”

And honestly will get responses like “he said he was a nice person.”

And I am left to say “oh, so he told you he was a nice person, so he’s definitely a nice person?”

And this includes — people who have been in abusive relationships.

They still do not seem to have a sense of — hey, it’s okay if you have a bit of distance as you get to know people over time.

And then I also get sucked into it, unfortunately.

But it seems like the kind of thing people with poor boundaries would do, to me, overall.  
 

And then I still think there are exceptions.

If someone is having a long-term relationship sleep over because he/she thinks the child is mature enough?  
 

That is not a boundary issue to me.

If it was encouraged so the child could be cool, or if it was a new relationship and the parents were saying “invite him to spend the night,” I think that would be poor boundaries.  (Or anything where the parents seemed eager to move the relationship along — I would think was poor boundaries.)

 

There are things I wouldn’t do, but I don’t think they are poor boundaries.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Katy said:

I’m struggling with all the references to a teenage “significant other.”  To me SO means serious, adult, committed relationship, equivalent to marriage but you aren’t married for some personal or political reason.  Not a first or fifth boyfriend.  Teenagers aren’t capable of having a significant other. 

I say that knowing several couples in their 40’s who started dating their spouse in 7th or 8th grade. Even if you think you’re in love there are way too many unknowns when you are 13 or even 17 to call a boyfriend or girlfriend a significant other. 

The downplaying of my significant teenage relationship by my mother was a serious obstacle in my relationship with her. And she wasn’t even all that bad about it, just the occasional passive aggressive comment.

As a 44yo married woman with some grown children of my own, I absolutely consider my first serious boyfriend  (which lasted 2.5+ years) to have been a significant other. And I’m still platonically fond of him and his family. 🙂 

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This is not a circumstance I have been in.  My kids are kind of social late bloomers as was DH and I.  They are 17 and 20 now and haven't had relationships like this to this point.  So honestly, for at least the next year or 2 I don't even see it coming up at our house.

That said, I do know several families who have made different decisions than me on this and all I would say is sometimes with teens you are making least bad choices and along for the ride.  I just assume other parents of young people are doing the best they can with the circumstances and teens and their relationships at their houses.  Especially for the 16/17+ and up crowd.  

My teenage relationships felt very important at the time and one felt serious.  SO is just an expression.  I guess I wouldn't think too hard on teens using it.  

Edited by FuzzyCatz
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I am shocked how many times I am in the minority on this board.  Paying for a hotel room for two teens to share with the assumption and/or expectation that they may be having s@x is a hard no for me.  I am a Christian, but from a non-Christian standard I still see problems with it.  The possibility of conception, even while using contraception, possibility of std's, and possibility of teen romance drama is just not worth it.  One could argue that none of those are going to happen, but I wouldn't feel comfortable with nonetheless.

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