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Quick…lol…I need a new washing machine


Scarlett
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23 hours ago, Soror said:

We went with the Speed Queen this spring after our 14 yr old needed an expensive repair. It is way faster and does well cleaning. I went with the model that I could open mid-cycle, I love that feature. We bought it for the warranty and durability.

You probably have one of the ones after sq went back to the the pre 2018 way of making it.  So that is good news.  Because I have read some complaints that the post 2018 is not as good as before the change was made in like 2017.  
 

Do you know what model you have?

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I read that cleaning tests use small towels, with individual stains, vs say, jeans and larger items that have ground in dirt and sweat. So it just depends what you mostly are washing. If you have a few small stains on mostly clean lightweight clothing, then swishing a long time in a small amount of water makes sense and probably works better. But if you have kid clothes caked in dirt, dog bedding, etc having those swishing in their own filth for 50 minutes isn't the best way to get them actually clean. 

Sort of like, sometimes a bath is great, but you don't put a kid caked in mud in the bath or they are sitting in a mud puddle and don't really get clean. 

But yes, they are harder on clothes, agitator machines. Again, if mostly using on kid clothes/jeans/etc maybe that's less of an issue to you than if you are washing nicer stuff. 

The other big thing with speed queen is how easy they are to work on, for those that like to work on their own stuff when need be. And have a much longer lifespan. 

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6 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

 

The other big thing with speed queen is how easy they are to work on, for those that like to work on their own stuff when need be. And have a much longer lifespan. 

Our washing machine repairman told us to get a Speed Queen. Even though we haven’t had to call him since buying it!

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7 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Our washing machine repairman told us to get a Speed Queen. Even though we haven’t had to call him since buying it!

The one article called them the muscle cars of appliances, and it is true. If you've seen under the hood on an old muscle car, how easy it is to get to everything and work on it, that's what the speed queen appliances are like. My husband was tweeting photos of the inside of it, lol, he was that impressed.

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4 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

I read that cleaning tests use small towels, with individual stains, vs say, jeans and larger items that have ground in dirt and sweat. So it just depends what you mostly are washing. If you have a few small stains on mostly clean lightweight clothing, then swishing a long time in a small amount of water makes sense and probably works better. But if you have kid clothes caked in dirt, dog bedding, etc having those swishing in their own filth for 50 minutes isn't the best way to get them actually clean. 

Sort of like, sometimes a bath is great, but you don't put a kid caked in mud in the bath or they are sitting in a mud puddle and don't really get clean. 

But yes, they are harder on clothes, agitator machines. Again, if mostly using on kid clothes/jeans/etc maybe that's less of an issue to you than if you are washing nicer stuff. 

The other big thing with speed queen is how easy they are to work on, for those that like to work on their own stuff when need be. And have a much longer lifespan. 

The SQs are way harder on clothes. Absolutely terrible IMO.

And extremely wasteful. One load on a SQ appears to use between 22 gallons of water for the widely criticized "cheating mode" that SQ uses as "normal" to evade DOE regulations and up to 50 gallons per load on the Heavy Duty/Deep Fill Cycle. That's for one (1) load.

In contrast, a Miele at max capacity uses less than 3.5 gallons per load. Plus the Mieles clean much better and don't destroy clothing in the process.

A Miele has similar longevity to SQ and are built to go 20 years.

Never in the 17 years we've owned our Miele have we needed to re-run a load because the clothes didn't come out clean. Never. Just the opposite. Clothes always come out well-cleaned and the whites sparkle.

Mieles clean better than SQs and don't destroy clothes the way Speed Queens do, using a fraction of the water.

Not feeling the love for these water-wasting/hard on clothes SQ machines myself.

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

The one article called them the muscle cars of appliances, and it is true. If you've seen under the hood on an old muscle car, how easy it is to get to everything and work on it, that's what the speed queen appliances are like. My husband was tweeting photos of the inside of it, lol, he was that impressed.

I grew up in Los Angeles during the reign of "muscle cars," when the air was air was regularly layered in orange-brown smog and when one's esophagus would burn just from breathing due to the pollution.

I think the "muscle car" analogy is very apt. I just have a very different remembrance of the environmental damage done by wasteful and unenlightened products like muscle cars.

SQs are like the muscle cars of appliances. Not remotely a positive in this person's opinion.

Bill

 

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23 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

The SQs are way harder on clothes. Absolutely terrible IMO.

And extremely wasteful. One load on a SQ appears to use between 22 gallons of water for the widely criticized "cheating mode" that SQ uses as "normal" to evade DOE regulations and up to 50 gallons per load on the Heavy Duty/Deep Fill Cycle. That's for one (1) load.

In contrast, a Miele at max capacity uses less than 3.5 gallons per load. Plus the Mieles clean much better and don't destroy clothing in the process.

A Miele has similar longevity to SQ and are built to go 20 years.

Never in the 17 years we've owned our Miele have we needed to re-run a load because the clothes didn't come out clean. Never. Just the opposite. Clothes always come out well-cleaned and the whites sparkle.

Mieles clean better than SQs and don't destroy clothes the way Speed Queens do, using a fraction of the water.

Not feeling the love for these water-wasting/hard on clothes SQ machines myself.

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

I've never used a miele, so can't compare to the cleaning level in one of those. That's a great brand in my experience with vacuums, but never even seen one of their washers. I also don't know how long a cycle runs, how hard they are to repair, etc. 

My comparisons are to the typical big box store brands of LG, Maytag, etc. I HATE my current washer, which is "efficient' as long as you don't count my time or actual ability to clean. 

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11 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

I grew up in Los Angeles during the reign of "muscle cars," when the air was air was regularly layered in orange-brown smog and when one's esophagus would burn just from breathing due to the pollution.

I think the "muscle car" analogy is very apt. I just have a very different remembrance of the environmental damage done by wasteful and unenlightened products like muscle cars.

SQs are like the muscle cars of appliances. Not remotely a positive in this person's opinion.

Bill

 

When I bought my Whirlpool Cabrio HE, I was feeling good about using less water even though that is not a concern here.  I did not really like the concept of using so little water....but everyone was saying it was just great and the future of washing machines.  But it doesn't work as promised.  So I really don't want to buy a new HE.  Maybe your Miele works fine, but my old washing machines worked fine too.

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Those with a speed queen, can you open the lid or in other manner soak clothes as long as you want? One of my frustrations with modern washers is that the best "soak" feature is for say, 20 minutes. 

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Just now, ktgrok said:

I've never used a miele, so can't compare to the cleaning level in one of those. That's a great brand in my experience with vacuums, but never even seen one of their washers. I also don't know how long a cycle runs, how hard they are to repair, etc. 

My comparisons are to the typical big box store brands of LG, Maytag, etc. I HATE my current washer, which is "efficient' as long as you don't count my time or actual ability to clean. 

Exactly.  What do you have currently?

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2 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Those with a speed queen, can you open the lid or in other manner soak clothes as long as you want? One of my frustrations with modern washers is that the best "soak" feature is for say, 20 minutes. 

Same with me.  I thought I had figured out a way to trick mine, but the last time I tried I found it drained of all the water when I got home from work. Pretty sure on at least one of the models there is no lid lock.

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Just now, Scarlett said:

Exactly.  What do you have currently?

I don't know the model, but an LG top loader with no agitator. I HATE the no agitator...I'm convinced that is why all the clothes end up so tangled. I do not remember that happening with my old agitator type washing machine. I spend forever untangling kids' pajamas every load, things end up balled up inside other things, etc. And getting the stink out of my husband's clothes is a PIA, not to go into what it was like washing cloth diapers. 

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2 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Same with me.  I thought I had figured out a way to trick mine, but the last time I tried I found it drained of all the water when I got home from work. Pretty sure on at least one of the models there is no lid lock.

Same. 

Like, DH's workout clothes, I'd like to soak those overnight now and then with some borox and washing soda. Now I have to do that in the freaking bath tub! That's ridiculous. 

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14 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

When I bought my Whirlpool Cabrio HE, I was feeling good about using less water even though that is not a concern here.  I did not really like the concept of using so little water....but everyone was saying it was just great and the future of washing machines.  But it doesn't work as promised.  So I really don't want to buy a new HE.  Maybe your Miele works fine, but my old washing machines worked fine too.

It isn't a "maybe" with Miele.

They are widely recognized as cleaning clothes perfectly (industry-leading), while being ultra-gentle on clothes, being very well engineered (20 year  machines), and using minimal water (and power).

In clothes handling and water usage, the SQs are seriously retrograde. And they get very bad reviews for cleaning in independent testing.

I'd be wary. I looked and was convinced they are too wasteful for our needs.

Bill

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41 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Never in the 17 years we've owned our Miele have we needed to re-run a load because the clothes didn't come out clean. 

I always wonder when people make that comment. I’ve never had a washer that didn’t clean very well. I’ve never in my life had to re-wash an entire load. A random item with a tough or set in stain—sure. But an entire load? I don’t mean to cast doubt, but in those cases I always wonder if the person used way too much detergent or a cheap detergent or way overloaded the machine. We’ve had some dirty stuff over the years but I’ve never had to re-wash an entire load. 

11 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Those with a speed queen, can you open the lid or in other manner soak clothes as long as you want? One of my frustrations with modern washers is that the best "soak" feature is for say, 20 minutes. 

I won’t say my Maytag will soak indefinitely, but I’ve not had any trouble soaking things overnight. My machine has a soak cycle but I use the normal cycle, let it agitate awhile and then pause it. I’ve never had it not stay paused until I re-started it. 

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34 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Those with a speed queen, can you open the lid or in other manner soak clothes as long as you want? One of my frustrations with modern washers is that the best "soak" feature is for say, 20 minutes. 

Yes, unlike my PPJunk Maytag I can open the lid without having it automatically drain.  And I can pause without it automatically draining either.

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10 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I always wonder when people make that comment. I’ve never had a washer that didn’t clean very well. I’ve never in my life had to re-wash an entire load. A random item with a tough or set in stain—sure. But an entire load? I don’t mean to cast doubt, but in those cases I always wonder if the person used way too much detergent or a cheap detergent or way overloaded the machine. We’ve had some dirty stuff over the years but I’ve never had to re-wash an entire load. 

I won’t say my Maytag will soak indefinitely, but I’ve not had any trouble soaking things overnight. My machine has a soak cycle but I use the normal cycle, let it agitate awhile and then pause it. I’ve never had it not stay paused until I re-started it. 

My entire load of laundry was coming out stinky. I use the exact same detergent and amounts in the SQ. No stink. And the clothes look brighter. 

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1 minute ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

My entire load of laundry was coming out stinky. I use the exact same detergent and amounts in the SQ. No stink. And the clothes look brighter. 

But if the SQ uses so much more water, and you’re using the same amount of detergent as you used in a machine that used less water, that could explain it. That might have been way too much detergent for the machine that used less water. Too much detergent hinders cleaning. My Maytag Is a HE machine. I rarely use more than 2 tablespoons of detergent unless I’m doing a deep wash (full tub).  

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14 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I always wonder when people make that comment. I’ve never had a washer that didn’t clean very well. I’ve never in my life had to re-wash an entire load. A random item with a tough or set in stain—sure. But an entire load? I don’t mean to cast doubt, but in those cases I always wonder if the person used way too much detergent or a cheap detergent or way overloaded the machine. We’ve had some dirty stuff over the years but I’ve never had to re-wash an entire load. 

I won’t say my Maytag will soak indefinitely, but I’ve not had any trouble soaking things overnight. My machine has a soak cycle but I use the normal cycle, let it agitate awhile and then pause it. I’ve never had it not stay paused until I re-started it. 

I never had to do that either until I got this Cabrio HE.  And I have been washing clothes over 40 years.  Heck, I have helped my mom wash clothes on a wringer washer in freezing temps.  But when I open the lid after the cycle on this Cabrio and two or three of the items are bone dry....or when my white sheets are streaked with brown marks....I definitely feel like I need to re-wash the load.  

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Just now, Pawz4me said:

But if the SQ uses so much more water, and you’re using the same amount of detergent as you used in a machine that used less water, that could explain it. That might have been way too much detergent for the machine that used less water. Too much detergent hinders cleaning. My Maytag Is a HE machine. I rarely use more than 2 tablespoons of detergent unless I’m doing a deep wash (full tub).  

I do use the correct amount of detergent.   And stinky isn't the problem I have.  But I do read about that a lot.

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1 minute ago, Scarlett said:

I never had to do that either until I got this Cabrio HE.  And I have been washing clothes over 40 years.  Heck, I have helped my mom wash clothes on a wringer washer in freezing temps.  But when I open the lid after the cycle on this Cabrio and two or three of the items are bone dry....or when my white sheets are streaked with brown marks....I definitely feel like I need to re-wash the load.  

That happened to us when we had a Cabrio, too. I hated that thing!

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23 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

I've never used a miele, so can't compare to the cleaning level in one of those. That's a great brand in my experience with vacuums, but never even seen one of their washers. I also don't know how long a cycle runs, how hard they are to repair, etc. 

My comparisons are to the typical big box store brands of LG, Maytag, etc. I HATE my current washer, which is "efficient' as long as you don't count my time or actual ability to clean. 

The Miele washing machines are very equivalent in quality to their widely loved vacuums (the best on the market IMO).

I'd owned a Miele vac (and still do after about 25 years of flawless performance) which is why I considered their washer/dryer in the first place. Absolutely excellent.

As I mentioned earlier, there was great dissatisfaction with the results of my using a Speed Queen at the laundromat when we (wrongly) thought our Miele died. Even I noticed how rough the SQ was on our clothes. My wife was most unhappy.

And 24-50 gallons per load with a SQ,  I'd feel grossly irresponsible in drought stricken CA when the Miele uses less than 3.5 gallons and cleans better, is gentler on clothes, and the machine cost about the same (and have similar longevity). And it pisses me off that SQ essentially cheated to get certification by developing a cycle that (barely) passed DOE requirements, but is so bad they recommend not using it.

If you had the opportunity to try a Miele washer/dryer, I'm sure you'd find the quality of the results and over-all engineering similar to the vacs.

As to time, IMS our average load ("normal") runs just under an hour (56 minutes). Some modes (such as hand-wash) are faster and there is one mode, "sanitize" that takes almost two hours (1:46?). I will occasionally run a sanitize load to keep the machine fresh and it is great when dealing with diapers or similarly soiled clothes (think elder care). The Miele has its own internal water heater to supplement the hot water supply, so the sanitize mode really works.

I think with repairs that one is locked into the Miele authorized network, but I've been impressed with their service here in Los Angeles. In my experience, these things last. And that's their general reputation.

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

 

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25 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I always wonder when people make that comment. I’ve never had a washer that didn’t clean very well. I’ve never in my life had to re-wash an entire load. A random item with a tough or set in stain—sure. But an entire load? I don’t mean to cast doubt, but in those cases I always wonder if the person used way too much detergent or a cheap detergent or way overloaded the machine. We’ve had some dirty stuff over the years but I’ve never had to re-wash an entire load. 

I enjoy gardening and get often pretty dirty. I tend to garden in what I call my "old cruddies," but no matter how dirty I get, the clothes wash out clean and smell fresh.

These also take very little detergent. It is the #1 bit of advice from Miele and Miele repair to go very light on detergent (which I like on multiple levels).

I was intrigued with SQ's reputation for durability, which seems real. I can't stand buying appliance that break after 5-8 years (and understand that's the way of the world for the most part). But Miele's have very similar longevity at a similar price point.

I bought ours when my wife was expecting. My son just turned 17. No regrets here.

Bill

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(Have not read the thread). I like my SQ well enough, but I have to say it doesn’t fill with enough water for me. Maybe all top loaders have this issue, but it’s really  annoying to have to submerge the clothes manually. 

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34 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I always wonder when people make that comment. I’ve never had a washer that didn’t clean very well. I’ve never in my life had to re-wash an entire load. A random item with a tough or set in stain—sure. But an entire load? I don’t mean to cast doubt, but in those cases I always wonder if the person used way too much detergent or a cheap detergent or way overloaded the machine. We’ve had some dirty stuff over the years but I’ve never had to re-wash an entire load. 

I won’t say my Maytag will soak indefinitely, but I’ve not had any trouble soaking things overnight. My machine has a soak cycle but I use the normal cycle, let it agitate awhile and then pause it. I’ve never had it not stay paused until I re-started it. 

 

9 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

The Miele washing machines are very equivalent in quality to their widely loved vacuums (the best on the market IMO).

I'd owned a Miele vac (and still do after about 25 years of flawless performance) which is why I considered their washer/dryer in the first place. Absolutely excellent.

As I mentioned earlier, there was great dissatisfaction with the results of my using a Speed Queen at the laundromat when we (wrongly) thought our Miele died. Even I noticed how rough the SQ was on our clothes. My wife was most unhappy.

And 24-50 gallons per load with a SQ,  I'd feel grossly irresponsible in drought stricken CA when the Miele uses less than 3.5 gallons and cleans better, is gentler on clothes, and the machine cost about the same (and have similar longevity). And it pisses me off that SQ essentially cheated to get certification by developing a cycle that (barely) passed DOE requirements, but is so bad they recommend not using it.

If you had the opportunity to try a Miele washer/dryer, I'm sure you'd find the quality of the results and over-all engineering similar to the vacs.

As to time, IMS our average load ("normal") runs just under an hour (56 minutes). Some modes (such as hand-wash) are faster and there is one mode, "sanitize" that takes almost two hours (1:46?). I will occasionally run a sanitize load to keep the machine fresh and it is great when dealing with diapers or similarly soiled clothes (think elder care). The Miele has its own internal water heater to supplement the hot water supply, so the sanitize mode really works.

I think with repairs that one is locked into the Miele authorized network, but I've been impressed with their service here in Los Angeles. In my experience, these things last. And that's their general reputation.

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

 

My husband likes to repair things himself, which obviously saves a lot of money. And 1-2 hours per load is one complaint many have. Now, I get the water issue, especially out west. 

But with a lot of the machines more commonly available, that water saving isn't accurate because as others noted, the machines guess wrong, clothes are not clean, and you end up running it again, or having to run most loads on a setting that uses the most water, etc. Not to even mention me having to soak stuff in the bathtub, lol. 

That said, I will look into Miel, as you said they do last. But I'm never ever buying another big box store agitator less washer. 

The miels are front load - do they get stinky like most front loaders where mold builds up? Or..maybe that isn't an issue in dry California, come to think of it. In Florida it drives people insane and they end up replacing the machine because of it. 

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3 minutes ago, madteaparty said:

(Have not read the thread). I like my SQ well enough, but I have to say it doesn’t fill with enough water for me. Maybe all top loaders have this issue, but it’s really  annoying to have to submerge the clothes manually. 

Might depend on what year/model. The pre 2018 use a lot of water, and some models after do, but others do not. 

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18 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

The Miele washing machines are very equivalent in quality to their widely loved vacuums (the best on the market IMO).

I'd owned a Miele vac (and still do after about 25 years of flawless performance) which is why I considered their washer/dryer in the first place. Absolutely excellent.

As I mentioned earlier, there was great dissatisfaction with the results of my using a Speed Queen at the laundromat when we (wrongly) thought our Miele died. Even I noticed how rough the SQ was on our clothes. My wife was most unhappy.

And 24-50 gallons per load with a SQ,  I'd feel grossly irresponsible in drought stricken CA when the Miele uses less than 3.5 gallons and cleans better, is gentler on clothes, and the machine cost about the same (and have similar longevity). And it pisses me off that SQ essentially cheated to get certification by developing a cycle that (barely) passed DOE requirements, but is so bad they recommend not using it.

If you had the opportunity to try a Miele washer/dryer, I'm sure you'd find the quality of the results and over-all engineering similar to the vacs.

As to time, IMS our average load ("normal") runs just under an hour (56 minutes). Some modes (such as hand-wash) are faster and there is one mode, "sanitize" that takes almost two hours (1:46?). I will occasionally run a sanitize load to keep the machine fresh and it is great when dealing with diapers or similarly soiled clothes (think elder care). The Miele has its own internal water heater to supplement the hot water supply, so the sanitize mode really works.

I think with repairs that one is locked into the Miele authorized network, but I've been impressed with their service here in Los Angeles. In my experience, these things last. And that's their general reputation.

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

 

The appliance store where I am going to look at the SQs this weekend has Miele washers.  I will take a look.  But it looks like they only have front loaders which I do not want.  Also, repairs would probably be difficult if I ever needed a repairman....I am....not in LA.

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7 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Might depend on what year/model. The pre 2018 use a lot of water, and some models after do, but others do not. 

The three floor models available to look at near me are the TR3, TR5 and TR7.  They are all backordered until late August.  So at least I know I will be getting one of the new/old models.  

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1 hour ago, ktgrok said:

Those with a speed queen, can you open the lid or in other manner soak clothes as long as you want? One of my frustrations with modern washers is that the best "soak" feature is for say, 20 minutes. 

Just found out ours does that-- soak as long as you forget to lower the top... we had this experiment last night...

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20 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

The three floor models available to look at near me are the TR3, TR5 and TR7.  They are all backordered until late August.  So at least I know I will be getting one of the new/old models.  

Ok, so according to this, the TR3 and TR7 have the newer method of the drum moving around the agitator, which got bad reviews for cleaning power, even from people that love speed queen. 

The TR5 has the "old" agitator moving that is harder on clothes, but gets things cleaner. 

https://blog.bellinghamelectric.com/blog/speed-queen-washer-reviews-built-to-last-25-years

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5 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ok, so according to this, the TR3 and TR7 have the newer method of the drum moving around the agitator, which got bad reviews for cleaning power, even from people that love speed queen. 

The TR5 has the "old" agitator moving that is harder on clothes, but gets things cleaner. 

https://blog.bellinghamelectric.com/blog/speed-queen-washer-reviews-built-to-last-25-years

Good to know!  I have been trying to go through the features on the appliance site....the blog is probably easier to navigate.

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7 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ok, so according to this, the TR3 and TR7 have the newer method of the drum moving around the agitator, which got bad reviews for cleaning power, even from people that love speed queen. 

The TR5 has the "old" agitator moving that is harder on clothes, but gets things cleaner. 

https://blog.bellinghamelectric.com/blog/speed-queen-washer-reviews-built-to-last-25-years

Or...maybe I'm wrong...and the newest TC5, not TR 5, has that agitator motion. https://blog.bellinghamelectric.com/blog/speed-queen-tc5000wn-classic-top-load-washer

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1 hour ago, Pawz4me said:

But if the SQ uses so much more water, and you’re using the same amount of detergent as you used in a machine that used less water, that could explain it. That might have been way too much detergent for the machine that used less water. Too much detergent hinders cleaning. My Maytag Is a HE machine. I rarely use more than 2 tablespoons of detergent unless I’m doing a deep wash (full tub).  

I used the correct amount of detergent for each washing machine. I have been doing laundry for over 40 years. 

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15 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

 

My husband likes to repair things himself, which obviously saves a lot of money. And 1-2 hours per load is one complaint many have. Now, I get the water issue, especially out west. 

But with a lot of the machines more commonly available, that water saving isn't accurate because as others noted, the machines guess wrong, clothes are not clean, and you end up running it again, or having to run most loads on a setting that uses the most water, etc. Not to even mention me having to soak stuff in the bathtub, lol. 

That said, I will look into Miel, as you said they do last. But I'm never ever buying another big box store agitator less washer. 

The miels are front load - do they get stinky like most front loaders where mold builds up? Or..maybe that isn't an issue in dry California, come to think of it. In Florida it drives people insane and they end up replacing the machine because of it. 

Normal loads are under an hour. Just under, but not 2 hours.

Sanitize mode is a valuable feature to have, but it's very long 1:46 cycle is rarely needed (assuming one is not regularly dealing with human fecal soiling), in which case it is a godsend. Really. And the sanitize mode kills off mildew and mold.

56 minutes for a normal load (90% of our usage) is not deal-breaking for this household. 

As to water savings, the Mieles are legendary for saving water.

We have never (not once) had to re-wash a load of laundry. The Miele washers are as good as their vacs (and that's a high compliment as you know). In contrast, the SQs appear to be absolute water hogs. 3.5 gallons vs 24-50 gallons per load is pretty dramatic. And in my brief experience with the laundromat SQs, they are very (very) hard on clothes, totally unlike the gentle (and more effective) wash one gets with Miele. 

Not only do we have ethical duties to save water here in CA, but we also get slapped pretty dun hard with excessive water charges when our water usage is high. I don't think owning an SQ here would be economical and I'd feel guilty.

If there is ever an issue with the Miele machine seeming unfresh, I will run a sanitizing cycle with or without a powder called (Affresh) made to kill mold/mildew and be good as new. Mrs Spy Car is a laundry maven and would not be happy with a stinky washer. She positively loves her Miele. 

It is true the air is dryer here in CA than in FL, so I'd seek local experience. All front loaders are somewhat prone to mildew. I'd likely be more diligent with wiping the rubber gasket dry if I lived in FL (as water collection inside the gasket seems like the chief culprit for facilitating mildew).

My 2 cents.

Bill

 

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2 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I used the correct amount of detergent for each washing machine. I have been doing laundry for over 40 years. 

??
 

Perhaps I misunderstood, but your previous post says you used “the exact same detergent and amounts.” Which seemed to me to mean you used the same detergent and the same amount in each machine. 

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1 minute ago, Pawz4me said:

??
 

Perhaps I misunderstood, but your previous post says you used “the exact same detergent and amounts.” Which seemed to me to mean you used the same detergent and the same amount in each machine. 

My mistake typing. I didn’t finish the sentence. “The exact same detergent and amounts recommended by the manufacturer “. 

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Ok, looking at washers, someone explain to me why a washer or dryer needs a feature for you to control it from your phone? Like....I can't put clothes IN it from across town, so turning it on from across town seems silly, lol. 

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Just now, Jean in Newcastle said:

My mistake typing. I didn’t finish the sentence. “The exact same detergent and amounts recommended by the manufacturer “. 

LOL! I do that a lot. It’s like I think you all know me well enough that you should know what I’m thinking. 😉 

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41 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

The appliance store where I am going to look at the SQs this weekend has Miele washers.  I will take a look.  But it looks like they only have front loaders which I do not want.  Also, repairs would probably be difficult if I ever needed a repairman....I am....not in LA.

I'd (obviously) double check, but if Mieles are sold locally in your area, I'd strongly suspect Miele has a required support/repair network in place. They are a German company and stereotypically very anal about such things. Ask.

It is true that Miele makes front loaders only. That is because they more efficient and do a better job cleaning clothes than archaic laundromat style agitator washing machines.

If you are dead-set on not having a front loader, then Mieles are out for you. But you might want to revisit the categorical exclusion of all front loaders.

The engineering on the Mieles is top notch. Unlike typical big-box washers, Mieles last. Like SQs they are designed and built for 2 decades of normal use. Not the typical throw-away devices generally sold today. And the prices are in line with SQs. High value IMO.

I would want to make sure I could get any washer/dryer serviced locally and to have parts available. 

Bill

 

 

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7 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ok, looking at washers, someone explain to me why a washer or dryer needs a feature for you to control it from your phone? Like....I can't put clothes IN it from across town, so turning it on from across town seems silly, lol. 

LOL.

Yeah, I don't get that either. Same with Sous Vide machines. I have one I can control via the internet. But why???

Bill

 

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11 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

I'd (obviously) double check, but if Mieles are sold locally in your area, I'd strongly suspect Miele has a required support/repair network in place. They are a German company and stereotypically very anal about such things. Ask.

It is true that Miele makes front loaders only. That is because they more efficient and do a better job cleaning clothes than archaic laundromat style agitator washing machines.

If you are dead-set on not having a front loader, then Mieles are out for you. But you might want to revisit the categorical exclusion of all front loaders.

The engineering on the Mieles is top notch. Unlike typical big-box washers, Mieles last. Like SQs they are designed and built for 2 decades of normal use. Not the typical throw-away devices generally sold today. And the prices are in line with SQs. High value IMO.

I would want to make sure I could get any washer/dryer serviced locally and to have parts available. 

Bill

 

 

The thing about the SQ is my  husband will be able to do any maintenance and repairs.

I do know the German engineering is top notch.  Dh loves his knee replacement.  😉

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21 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ok, looking at washers, someone explain to me why a washer or dryer needs a feature for you to control it from your phone? Like....I can't put clothes IN it from across town, so turning it on from across town seems silly, lol. 

Dh said maybe it is so you can get an alert when the cycle finishes and remind the teenager to reboot his laundry.

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29 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Yes, that is what I was thinking that the new TC5 is not the good design.

I believe the TR machines are the 2018 SQs that inspired internet outrage.

The TC series is back to the older style of agitator that beats clothes to hell.

Before buying one of these I'd advise you to take a load of clothes you don't care that much about (with a representative mix of items) and wash them in a laundromat Speed Queen.

Having used laundromat SQs totally killed my "buzz" with regard to these washers. 

SQs are very common in laundromats, so try for yourself and ask is you'd be happy with two decades of very rough clothes treatment? 

Bill

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5 hours ago, Scarlett said:

You probably have one of the ones after sq went back to the the pre 2018 way of making it.  So that is good news.  Because I have read some complaints that the post 2018 is not as good as before the change was made in like 2017.  
 

Do you know what model you have?

I have the TC5. Capacity is about 2/3rd of my previous washer but it is less than half the wash time at 30ish minutes for a regular load (what I do almost all the time). Capacity is more than sufficient for our family of 6 and on the plus side I don't have to worry about loads taking forever to dry, washing full loads in my previous washer would take over an hour to wash and 2+ hrs to dry (certainly not energy efficient). 

ETA: I had no desire for a front load machine with the reports I'd read on mildew being an issue.

(sure seems like some people must make commissions on washing machines or something)

Edited by Soror
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4 hours ago, Scarlett said:

When I bought my Whirlpool Cabrio HE, I was feeling good about using less water even though that is not a concern here.  I did not really like the concept of using so little water....but everyone was saying it was just great and the future of washing machines.  But it doesn't work as promised.  So I really don't want to buy a new HE.  Maybe your Miele works fine, but my old washing machines worked fine too.

And newer machines are not necessarily made the same way as older machines. A Maytag or Miele from nearly 20 years ago isn't the same as a machine made today.  When people say "I've had my Acme Widget Washer for 20 years and it works just fine!", I think "Great, where can I get a new-old-stock, 20 year old Acme Widget Washer?" No where.  The performance of a machine I can no longer buy doesn't help me make a choice on what's available today. 

I've had my SQ for 4 or 5 years, and haven't noticed it beating up the clothes, for what that's worth. 

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