Jump to content

Menu

Relatives dying from Covid is much harder now that the vaccine is available.


Shelydon
 Share

Recommended Posts

40 minutes ago, regentrude said:

For some people I know, the fact that it's one-and-done is the reason they choose J&J.

My MIL chose the J&J for this reason.

She wouldn’t have gotten vaccinated at all except her kids denied her the opportunity to visit her grandchildren unless she got on board. She doesn’t really believe in COVID or that she needs protection, though. I’m very concerned about her upcoming visit. They take zero precautions and are coming from a deep red/ high caseload, low vax state.

  • Sad 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

Are there figures for J and J and Delta? One jab of AZ doesn't give much protection. 

My understanding is that the protection is pretty low. I consider it partially vaccinated against Delta especially. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The people I know who opted for J&J did so mostly because they believe vaccination will be required to travel easily, especially cruises. They think Covid is overblown and aren't worried about getting it. So . . one and done, just to meet any requirements that will enable them to do what they want to do.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

The people I know who opted for J&J did so mostly because they believe vaccination will be required to travel easily, especially cruises. They think Covid is overblown and aren't worried about getting it. So . . one and done, just to meet any requirements that will enable them to do what they want to do.

This is what I have seen as well. 
 

There are also a number of retired military personnel who got J & J simply because that’s what the VA was giving out. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no idea why my brother got the J and J.  He has all sorts of strange beliefs- with eating, with refusing to get eyeglasses or contacts, etc though I am sure he is not any sort of Q Anon person.  Maybe he just trusted the J and J technology more though he is not anti technology at all or maybe it was just the easiest to get at the time he was getting it.  I know he is into travel nowadays so I could see him trying to boost with mRNA at some point if that is a preferred vaccine someplace.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

The people I know who opted for J&J did so mostly because they believe vaccination will be required to travel easily, especially cruises. They think Covid is overblown and aren't worried about getting it. So . . one and done, just to meet any requirements that will enable them to do what they want to do.

The two people I know that got JJ did it for a cruise. They hadn't planned to get vaccinated at all but had to in order to go. They went with the easiest option as they are not concerned about getting Covid.

Edited by Soror
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, lauraw4321 said:

Reducing severe disease is a great goal, but I don’t think it’s what most people expect from vaccines. Maybe it’s an unreasonable expectation, but it was certainly mine. I’ve never known someone to get rubella or measles or whooping cough, and in my mind that’s because of vaccines. Yet I don’t expect the flu vaccine to keep me from getting the flu. So it feels like a different category, even though I’m learning that it really isn’t. 

I agree with others that it's different in our mind because we've mostly achieved herd immunity, but I agree that it's not what people tend to think. They often do on this board, but we're weird on here, in a good way.

I understand it a little better because DH is in healthcare, but he's not as likely to discuss all the nuances with me as the board is, so I understand it much better having been on here when vaccines have been discussed in the past.

13 hours ago, HeartString said:

The difference there is that rubella and measles are one, discrete virus, where as what we call the flu is a category or family of virus.   There are dozens of flu viruses.  Being vaccinated against 1 gives minimal protection against 2-25. 


I have learned through all of the COVID stuff that some of the difference  is how fast a virus attacks the body.  The way I heard it explained is that it takes a certain amount of time for the body to spin up an immune response to a virus and it takes each virus a certain amount of time to make you sick.  With measles your immunized body can spin up a response faster than the measles can get a chance to make you sick.  The flu virus is faster at attacking than the measles virus, but your body is still working at the same speed.  So the flu vaccine is just simply not as effective because of the nature of the virus. 

I think we tend to think of "virus" as one sort of thing, but that's not right.  One virus can be as different from the other as one mammal is from another.  You need a different sort of thing to fight off a squirrel than a hippo, than a killer whale, even though all of those are mammals.  Same with measles and flu, or Covid, or HIV. 

That's interesting!

2 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

The people I know who opted for J&J did so mostly because they believe vaccination will be required to travel easily, especially cruises. They think Covid is overblown and aren't worried about getting it. So . . one and done, just to meet any requirements that will enable them to do what they want to do.

I think there were people here who really needed the shot to be one and done for scheduling purposes, especially college students. I am not sure all colleges were equally helpful about having students miss class to recover from one of the mRNA shots, and often you can't really schedule around times when you have a lot of high-stakes projects or tests. One friend ended up getting Pfizer based on her doctor's recommendation, but because she'd had really bad reactions to flu shots in the past (days of being sick), she was thinking one shot encounter sounded way better than two. 

For a while, here, what you got depended on where you got your shot, and people who really wanted to be vaccinated were taking what they could get.

I got in asap (Pfizer, thankfully), but I truly believed that if I passed up a shot, I might not get the chance later. I thought we'd vaccinate the willing and then ship it all to other countries, TBH. I am shocked that the reluctant are still able to get a vaccine. I am not the only one that thought the opportunity could pass, and I bet some of those folks got J and J solely because it was available. (Additionally, I know some people waited partly because they remember the flu pandemic in the 60's and remembered a big push to get people vaccinated, and then, all of the sudden, it was over, they didn't need the vaccine, etc. I considered this wishful thinking, but it's one of many things people considered.) 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was going to say I know a fair number of young people who got the J&J because it was easy to schedule and that's what my son's college campus was offering for a bit before students left campus in the spring.  I wouldn't assume anyone taking it thinks covid is a hoax, etc.  Really when it was first rolled out and it was marketed as an equally good option.  I get a flu shot every year and I have never had the flu those years and that has less efficacy.  But I have had it multiple years where I delayed getting it for one reason or another.   I kind of assumed J&J would roll out their 2 dose study and most of those people would be encouraged to get a booster at some point.  

  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I was going to say I know a fair number of young people who got the J&J because it was easy to schedule and that's what my son's college campus was offering for a bit before students left campus in the spring. 

I know a bunch of college students who preferred the J&J because they didn't become vaccine eligible until rather late in the semester, and scheduling two shots to be done before leaving town (with any possible side effects after the second dose not affecting finals week) was just logistically extremely difficult.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I was going to say I know a fair number of young people who got the J&J because it was easy to schedule and that's what my son's college campus was offering for a bit before students left campus in the spring.  I wouldn't assume anyone taking it thinks covid is a hoax, etc.  Really when it was first rolled out and it was marketed as an equally good option.  I get a flu shot every year and I have never had the flu those years and that has less efficacy.  But I have had it multiple years where I delayed getting it for one reason or another.   I kind of assumed J&J would roll out their 2 dose study and most of those people would be encouraged to get a booster at some point.  

  

Good point about the booster.  I also assumed that J & J would offer a booster.  But perhaps the clotting thing derailed that? 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I was going to say I know a fair number of young people who got the J&J because it was easy to schedule and that's what my son's college campus was offering for a bit before students left campus in the spring.  I wouldn't assume anyone taking it thinks covid is a hoax, etc.  Really when it was first rolled out and it was marketed as an equally good option.  I get a flu shot every year and I have never had the flu those years and that has less efficacy.  But I have had it multiple years where I delayed getting it for one reason or another.   I kind of assumed J&J would roll out their 2 dose study and most of those people would be encouraged to get a booster at some point.  

  

I know several people who got it early when getting an appointment for any vaccine was a triumph and the guidance was "whatever shot you're offered, take it."

It turns out if they'd waited a few weeks they would have had their pick of vaccines and appointment times, but they didn't know that at the time.

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/19/2021 at 12:09 AM, PeterPan said:

I've met some health care workers who were anti on the mRNA covid vax. Do you think these people are anti *all* vax or only the mRNA? I'm just wondering (and anecdotes would suffice) whether a shot that is more like the flu shot (which the novamax appears to be) will be differently received. Had they previously taken the flu shot or had they usually refused that too?

In this case unfortunately no. These are the same nurses who complain about the fact that annual flu shots are required as a condition of employment. They don't vaccinate their children, and not for legitimate medical reasons. They're truly anti-vax. 😢

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Seasider too said:

Musing on this…. There is/was the notion for a long time, in conservative families, that the only acceptable outside the home occupations were teacher or nurse. So I wonder if there is a correlation between antivax folks (as in, big advocates for personal freedom) and occupations.
 

Doesn’t seem to hold true for teachers, though, ime. I guess I’m just struggling to find logic somewhere. 

The nurses I know who have had (what I feel is) a disconnect between their professional knowledge and their reaction to Covid vaccines have been influenced by political/ QAnon type conspiracy theories.  And it is a disconnect. 

  • Like 3
  • Sad 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Danae said:

I know several people who got it early when getting an appointment for any vaccine was a triumph and the guidance was "whatever shot you're offered, take it."

It turns out if they'd waited a few weeks they would have had their pick of vaccines and appointment times, but they didn't know that at the time.

Yes, for sure!  I was super impressed with one of my son's college roomies who rented a zip car and drove 90 minutes to get the J&J and was one of the earlier students to be vaccinated before they were vaccinating students on campus.  My son ended up with Pfizer being a bit slower.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Same here, plus at first some I know had to make a long drive to the nearest place with any available vaccine appointments. Getting Moderna or Pfizer meant not one but two long drives (I know some that went >2 hours away). The J&J made it a one-trip event. 

Yes, absolutely this.  I know several people that were registering everywhere, refreshing every page, trying every option, back in late winter/early spring when it was really hard to get a shot.  There were so many reports of extras given away at the end of the day, etc if you were just willing to drive around and try to get a shot.  So any shot found was taken.  Some people in my state were also "randomly selected" to get a shot before their group was generally eligible and even if it was J&J, they were very excited to be picked before it was just available to everyone.  Some of those people I know are definitely regretting now they didn't just wait a month or two when they could have gotten one of the other two.  But at the time,  it seemed liked the right thing to do.  🤷‍♀️

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

In this case unfortunately no. These are the same nurses who complain about the fact that annual flu shots are required as a condition of employment. They don't vaccinate their children, and not for legitimate medical reasons. They're truly anti-vax. 😢

And how little do I understand that- to think how many people died of smallpox!  How many people got deaf with measles!  Etc, etc.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Musing on this…. There is/was the notion for a long time, in conservative families, that the only acceptable outside the home occupations were teacher or nurse. So I wonder if there is a correlation between antivax folks (as in, big advocates for personal freedom) and occupations.
 

Doesn’t seem to hold true for teachers, though, ime. I guess I’m just struggling to find logic somewhere. 

In a subset of conservative families.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

And how little do I understand that- to think how many people died of smallpox!  How many people got deaf with measles!  Etc, etc.

They claim that hygiene and clean water cured those, not vaccines. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

They claim that hygiene and clean water cured those, not vaccines. 

which makes no sense since measles is airborne, and smallpox is mainly inhalation of droplets (it is still undetermined to what degree aerosol transmission was relevant)

Hygiene and clean water are responsible for the disappearance of cholera in developed countries

Edited by regentrude
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, regentrude said:

which makes no sense since measles is airborne, and smallpox is mainly inhalation of droplets (it is still undetermined to what degree aerosol transmission was relevant)

Hygiene and clean water are responsible for the disappearance of cholera in developed countries

Oh, well if you want to require the reasoning to make sense....

sigh. 

My last homeschool outing back in march 2020 we were just starting to really talk about Covid and I heard someone say that Covid was caused by flu vaccines given to the military. And that was the last event I went to. 

  • Confused 4
  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

The nurses I know who have had (what I feel is) a disconnect between their professional knowledge and their reaction to Covid vaccines have been influenced by political/ QAnon type conspiracy theories.  And it is a disconnect. 

So the nurse I’ve based my responses on (says she’s not anti-vaccine normally, this one was rushed, has been snarky about the Covid vaccine), re-posted this on FB today:

image.png.2f3e4c4177563284146861766ce6d826.png

  • Sad 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, kbutton said:

So the nurse I’ve based my responses on (says she’s not anti-vaccine normally, this one was rushed, has been snarky about the Covid vaccine), re-posted this on FB today:

image.png.2f3e4c4177563284146861766ce6d826.png

The very last thing people need are hugs from an unvaccinated nurse.
(At least bibles and pocket constitutions don't spread disease. )

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2
  • Haha 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Seasider too said:

Same here, plus at first some I know had to make a long drive to the nearest place with any available vaccine appointments. Getting Moderna or Pfizer meant not one but two long drives (I know some that went >2 hours away). The J&J made it a one-trip event. 

This was my fam. My dh and 2 of my dds got J and J because appointments were scarce at the time. My husband wants to go ahead and get an mrna now, too. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, kbutton said:

So the nurse I’ve based my responses on (says she’s not anti-vaccine normally, this one was rushed, has been snarky about the Covid vaccine), re-posted this on FB today:

image.png.2f3e4c4177563284146861766ce6d826.png

I can’t even.  There’s not a reaction emoji that works here, I think what would be best is a screaming face.  
 

That’s the kind of thing that makes me happy we don’t do FB here.  Wow.  How do you even process that?!

 

(Oh, and totally off base but way back at the beginning of this mess, I thought it was determined that elderberry syrup wasn’t a good option?  Something about immune response. Not that it matters!)

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Spryte said:

I can’t even.  There’s not a reaction emoji that works here, I think what would be best is a screaming face.  
 

That’s the kind of thing that makes me happy we don’t do FB here.  Wow.  How do you even process that?!

This is after pretty brutal paring down of FB friends. Screaming emoji, indeed.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Spryte said:

I can’t even.  There’s not a reaction emoji that works here, I think what would be best is a screaming face.  
 

That’s the kind of thing that makes me happy we don’t do FB here.  Wow.  How do you even process that?!

 

(Oh, and totally off base but way back at the beginning of this mess, I thought it was determined that elderberry syrup wasn’t a good option?  Something about immune response. Not that it matters!)

You may be remembering the responses of a number of us who have autoimmune diseases- we can't do elderberry syrup nor echinacea (not mentioned here) because they ramp up the immune system and ours are messed up and will just make our given autoimmune disease(s) worse.  

But also, one of the problems with COVID is that early on- you want your immune system to work but very soon after, you do not want it to work very much- much of the problems with COVID are too much of the immune system which is why one of the most commonly used medications is a steroid.  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

You may be remembering the responses of a number of us who have autoimmune diseases- we can't do elderberry syrup nor echinacea (not mentioned here) because they ramp up the immune system and ours are messed up and will just make our given autoimmune disease(s) worse.  

But also, one of the problems with COVID is that early on- you want your immune system to work but very soon after, you do not want it to work very much- much of the problems with COVID are too much of the immune system which is why one of the most commonly used medications is a steroid.  

Ah, that’s it.  Thanks.  Everyone except DH in our family has autoimmune issues, so I must have mentally scratched it off the list. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, kbutton said:

So the nurse I’ve based my responses on (says she’s not anti-vaccine normally, this one was rushed, has been snarky about the Covid vaccine), re-posted this on FB today:

image.png.2f3e4c4177563284146861766ce6d826.png

So is colloidal silver Jesus, herbs, history or hugs?   Cause I'm thinking it's <<gasp>> a chemical.  

  • Haha 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...