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At what point would you lock down again?


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7 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

That's a harsh lesson to learn about your fellow human beings. And then we turn around and demand kids respect their elders... 

I can't even imagine acting like that ever!  Nuts.  You are laughing about someone dying?  How is that funny ever?  That has just made me lost respect and be so sadden to be here with people like that.  I feel sorry for whenever someone dies and someone is talking about it.  I mean I feel bad for the people who are not vaccinated that are dying.  And their family that is left behind and in pain.  I don't laugh at their deaths. 

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10 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

I can't even imagine acting like that ever!  Nuts.  You are laughing about someone dying?  How is that funny ever?  That has just made me lost respect and be so sadden to be here with people like that.  I feel sorry for whenever someone dies and someone is talking about it.  I mean I feel bad for the people who are not vaccinated that are dying.  And their family that is left behind and in pain.  I don't laugh at their deaths. 

I hope that woman enjoys her fame.   Her picture/video is now out there showing how heartless and rude she is.

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11 minutes ago, Wheres Toto said:

I hope that woman enjoys her fame.   Her picture/video is now out there showing how heartless and rude she is.

That poor kid.

Who wants to bet that, within the next few months, we will read about a Go Fund Me for some family member of hers begging for money? Karma has a way of catching up to these people. 

 

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23 hours ago, cintinative said:

No, it's a whole other thread really.   He also is of the opinion that the mask mandates (which OH doesn't have anymore, but I digress), etc. are all part of slippery slope that will lead us all into communism.  It's that whole "freedom as an individual" versus "responsibility to the community" debate that we have been discussing for months. 

This made me flash back to some discussions here early March 2020, at the very beginning of the pandemic. Masking wasn't a generalized thing yet, though many of us were doing so, and I recall there being posters saying that mask wearing is something they do in Asian countries, but it's not something "we do here" and they didn't want the US to become like those countries. I wonder if that is still underlying some of the mask aversion in certain groups, either in a subliminal way, or in an overt but unspoken way.

23 hours ago, SKL said:

Yeah, I personally don't consider mandates to have anything to do with my personal responsibility to the community.  If I have no choice, I do what I have to do because I have to, not because I'm responsible.  If I have a choice, I do a thing based on my feeling of responsibility.

I think freedom as an individual is very compatible with responsibility to the community.

That may be true for you and for some others, but in general we have seen over this pandemic that it's not that way for a whole lot of people. There are a lot of places where no one will wear a mask unless/until it's mandated, and then they put the masks on, for example. I was actually just in such a place. A part of the state that has had higher covid rates and aversion to mitigation measures, yet waiting outside the grcoery store for a curbside delivery, I saw people pulling out their masks and putting them on to go inside, because there in an indoor mandate. I never saw a single mask the rest of the time, even in close contact outdoor situations that people would definitely be wearing them in my area. I am certain very few people would be masking in the grocery store if not for the mandate. If the pandemic has taught me anything, it's that there's a whole huge portion of our population that feels no responsibility to their community whatsoever.

22 hours ago, Corraleno said:

This is the kind of bullshit OpEd piece that really ticks me off. This is the headline:

I'm so tired of bad headlines that give the wrong idea to the 95% of people who are never going to read the piece itself. I see so much of that. That's one problem I see with just sharing news headline pieces without any quotes or thoughts about them, because more often than not, people are just going to read the title of the link without clicking, and then whatever the headline says is just going to get integrated as truth for a lot of people. (It's worth mentioning as an aside for people without journalism experience that headlines in print journalism are added later by someone other than the person who wrote the piece, which is what sometimes leads to headlines being a really poor (or even totally wrong) representation of what the piece says.)

18 hours ago, Shoes+Ships+SealingWax said:

Well, crap - DS8 is positive. Still totally asymptomatic, so no idea if it’s a new development or not. 

DH is vaccinated & positive. DS is unvaccinated & positive. I am vaccinated & negative. We’ve been quarantining for 10 days already, with DH isolated in a bedroom - but I’ve been caring for DS largely unmasked. Now we have at least another 10 days on our clock.

 

Was that the first test your DS took? I'm still thinking it's quite possible your DS was the index case. Either way, I agree with what you have decided to do. At this point, I would expect you have passed peak exposure and your vaccine must be holding well. You said it was a rapid test your DS took? That does indicate a higher level of infectiousness than would necessarily be true for a PCR, though.

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1 hour ago, Wheres Toto said:

I hope that woman enjoys her fame.   Her picture/video is now out there showing how heartless and rude she is.

Every day, there are people openly putting their names out there in laughing faces on articles about people’s Covid tragedies. They’re perfectly happy to be known. 🥺🤢

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35 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Sounds like the study was a bit iffy, but I kind of wouldn't be upset if this was true....having those taking horse paste reproduce is probably not a great benefit to society. 

It's like a less deadly version of the Darwin award...

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2 hours ago, Wheres Toto said:

I hope that woman enjoys her fame.   Her picture/video is now out there showing how heartless and rude she is.

Some people on TikTok/Twitter were able to identify her, and she is a registered nurse. Supposedly, a hospice nurse. She was easily identified because she attended other board meetings and spoke. 

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3 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

That's a harsh lesson to learn about your fellow human beings. And then we turn around and demand kids respect their elders... 

Agreed. Sad to say, but I think kids today have very little reason to respect adults in general in society. The world is on fire, they have not had a hand in that but suffer the consequences of the adults in charge, and then are sent to school like it is an exercise in child sacrifice because half the adults in this country are too damn self centered to give a crap. 

I weep for that student. I cannot imagine the sorrow, the horror of witnesses and hearing that cruelty in person. Laughing at this child's anguish? 100% depraved, sociopathic depraved. I hope people accept this person verbally at every opportunity, online, in the workplace, everywhere. The end result should be someone so ostracized that they seek to hide underneath a rock!

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45 minutes ago, OH_Homeschooler said:

Some people on TikTok/Twitter were able to identify her, and she is a registered nurse. Supposedly, a hospice nurse. She was easily identified because she attended other board meetings and spoke. 

A hospice nurse?!??  Horrible.

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54 minutes ago, OH_Homeschooler said:

Some people on TikTok/Twitter were able to identify her, and she is a registered nurse. Supposedly, a hospice nurse. She was easily identified because she attended other board meetings and spoke. 

That’s so weird and sad.

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Editor’s note: Following audience concerns over the efficacy and accuracy of the scientific methods used in the ivermectin study performed in Nigeria in 2011, the original publishing station, KTSM, issued the following correction:

FOR THE RECORD: A national story regarding Ivermectin and a study regarding its effect on men’s reproductive health that KTSM published, has been removed from our website.  

Concerns over the scientific research methods, the veracity of the original, peer-reviewed report and public statements by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) saying that infertility is not a known side effect of Ivermectin all led to our editorial decision to remove the story.

2 hours ago, ktgrok said:

Sounds like the study was a bit iffy, but I kind of wouldn't be upset if this was true....having those taking horse paste reproduce is probably not a great benefit to society. 

So you’re saying the study looked at men who took the animal version of Ivermectin? 
 

2 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

It's like a less deadly version of the Darwin award...

The story was taken down due to veracity issues

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3 hours ago, ktgrok said:

Sounds like the study was a bit iffy, but I kind of wouldn't be upset if this was true....having those taking horse paste reproduce is probably not a great benefit to society. 

Medical/sciencey people on Twitter are really encouraging people to stop sharing it because it’s bad science.  Apparently too many people were excluded due to poor quality sperm in the first place to make it reliable or something?

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6 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Medical/sciencey people on Twitter are really encouraging people to stop sharing it because it’s bad science.  Apparently too many people were excluded due to poor quality sperm in the first place to make it reliable or something?

Then we should stop sharing it. It’s always easier to be critical of information one doesn’t agree with, which makes it MORE important to be critical of information one does agree with.

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1 minute ago, Not_a_Number said:

Then we should stop sharing it. It’s always easier to be critical of information one doesn’t agree with, which makes it MORE important to be critical of information one does agree with.

Oh, I agree it is a terrible study, obviously something else was going on if that many were excluded for low sperm count. 

I won't be sharing, just was commenting. 

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5 hours ago, mommyoffive said:

I can't even imagine acting like that ever!  Nuts.  You are laughing about someone dying?  How is that funny ever?  That has just made me lost respect and be so sadden to be here with people like that.  I feel sorry for whenever someone dies and someone is talking about it.  I mean I feel bad for the people who are not vaccinated that are dying.  And their family that is left behind and in pain.  I don't laugh at their deaths. 

That makes me feel so angry. I really can’t help but hope that that woman gets sufficient feedback about her behavior that she is thoroughly ashamed of herself. What a jerky way to behave!

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2 hours ago, OH_Homeschooler said:

Some people on TikTok/Twitter were able to identify her, and she is a registered nurse. Supposedly, a hospice nurse. She was easily identified because she attended other board meetings and spoke. 

if this twitter thread is to be believed, she was a case manager with Cigna and was fired after the video surfaced.

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ErikaCasher

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2 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Medical/sciencey people on Twitter are really encouraging people to stop sharing it because it’s bad science.

Which, fwiw, I have seen from medical/sciencey people on Twitter throughout this pandemic when bad research is shared, even if it supports a conclusion otherwise agreed with. Most scientists really are looking for truth and do hold research to a high standard, contrary to the beliefs of conspiracy theorists.

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1 hour ago, cintinative said:

if this twitter thread is to be believed, she was a case manager with Cigna and was fired after the video surfaced.

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ErikaCasher

Good. SAP fired the coughing Karen in the grocery store too, Janene Hoskovec.

About time we get serious with these people. Play stupid games; win stupid prizes. 

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27 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

Good. SAP fired the coughing Karen in the grocery store too, Janene Hoskovec.

About time we get serious with these people. Play stupid games; win stupid prizes. 

I am conflicted on this trend.  On one hand, I don't think that people should be able to get away with such bad behavior.  And the threat of "being thought badly of" is no longer a deterrent from bad behavior.  But on the other hand, I don't really like the thought of people being doxed and shamed.  So I am conflicted. 

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8 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I am conflicted on this trend.  On one hand, I don't think that people should be able to get away with such bad behavior.  And the threat of "being thought badly of" is no longer a deterrent from bad behavior.  But on the other hand, I don't really like the thought of people being doxed and shamed.  So I am conflicted. 

I get it, Jean. I am conflicted, too. Certainly more conflicted than my post above expressed. But, I also think that I am far more exasperated by the pandemic, and the toll that it is taking on humanity, than I am conflicted right now. Under normal circumstances, I am not a fan of doxing. People make mistakes, They should be allowed to own up to them and not lose their livelihood. But, this is life and death stuff. That one lady was literally coughing on people and laughing maniacally, so I am not so sure that I care about her being made an example of by her employer, at this point.

Edited by SeaConquest
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I think an employer making a choice about an at will employee is completely different than stalking, threats, etc.  People get quietly fired daily for all sorts of stupid reasons.  It isn't unreasonable that a business would not want certain employees representing them loudly out on social media or in the community.  Obviously freedom of speech exists and should prevail.  That doesn't mean you shouldn't suffer logical legal consequences of your choices.  

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So it is homecoming week. Facebook is full of pep rallies at high school and junior high . Stands are packed inside the gyms, no masks.  A senior adult group is packed in a bus to go to Branson. Life goes on.  

Our positivity for the two counties is close to 20 percent.  One county 234 cases per 100,000 the other 175. 

Edited by TexasProud
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4 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

That’s so weird and sad.

Some of the biggest Freedumb, anti-vax (sometimes only Covid, sometimes not), and anti-maskers where I live are nurses. 

30 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I am conflicted on this trend.  On one hand, I don't think that people should be able to get away with such bad behavior.  And the threat of "being thought badly of" is no longer a deterrent from bad behavior.  But on the other hand, I don't really like the thought of people being doxed and shamed.  So I am conflicted. 

Me too. I wonder what a good alternative would be. If we go back far enough, people were doxed/fired for things like getting pregnant out of wedlock (presumably with morality clauses at work). It's not new behavior, it's just more public now and more a form of mob behavior now. 

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3 minutes ago, kbutton said:

 

Some of the biggest Freedumb, anti-vax (sometimes only Covid, sometimes not), and anti-maskers where I live are nurses. 

Me too. I wonder what a good alternative would be. If we go back far enough, people were doxed/fired for things like getting pregnant out of wedlock (presumably with morality clauses at work). It's not new behavior, it's just more public now and more a form of mob behavior now. 

Yes, the mob behavior aspect is what bothers me. What happens if the employers/ mob switches over to favoring being anti-mask, pro-let-er-rip (or whatever the current issue might change to)?  I might agree with the "mob" right now but I don't agree with mobbish behavior. 

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10 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Yes, the mob behavior aspect is what bothers me. What happens if the employers/ mob switches over to favoring being anti-mask, pro-let-er-rip (or whatever the current issue might change to)?  I might agree with the "mob" right now but I don't agree with mobbish behavior. 

Yep, though I really can understand what motivates it--when people are so brazenly mean, it's just astonishing. 

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27 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Yes, the mob behavior aspect is what bothers me. What happens if the employers/ mob switches over to favoring being anti-mask, pro-let-er-rip (or whatever the current issue might change to)?  I might agree with the "mob" right now but I don't agree with mobbish behavior. 

Well, in this case it effects her job. If she has zero empathy for family members who have a dying or deceased loved one, you REALLY don't want her representing your hospice, you know? Like, respect and dignity in death, and compassion toward the patient AND the family are the whole purpose of hospice, and this woman displayed the exact opposite traits in public. No hospice wants that behavior associated with their program. 

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3 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Well, in this case it effects her job. If she has zero empathy for family members who have a dying or deceased loved one, you REALLY don't want her representing your hospice, you know? Like, respect and dignity in death, and compassion toward the patient AND the family are the whole purpose of hospice, and this woman displayed the exact opposite traits in public. No hospice wants that behavior associated with their program. 

If she's a case manager for Cigna, isn't that health insurance?  It's not a hospice, is it? 

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17 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

If she's a case manager for Cigna, isn't that health insurance?  It's not a hospice, is it? 

If she's a nurse and a case manager, she might be assigned to a specific case load as a point of contact and essentially a gatekeeper. I had one assigned by BC/BS during my pregnancy with L with the goal of both keeping me out of the hospital (and less expensive to the insurance company) and providing extra monitoring. And I'm very glad she was assigned, because she was able to pick up, over the phone, that my "Feeling odd" was important and sent me straight to L&D. She was right-less than 12 hours later, I was being prepped for an emergency c-section. 

 

So, she might be a nurse assigned as a case manager for hospice/terminal patients-and if so, that is someone who definitely needs compassion!!

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School outbreaks and what it means for hospital capacity - by Katelyn Jetelina - Your Local Epidemiologist (substack.com)

Well, to no one’s surprise, we’re setting records for kids across the nation as schools re-open. We have no national COVID19 school surveillance program in place, so we’re relying on anecdotal evidence, state-level data, and data gurus in the private sector to piece together an epidemiological picture.

Mississippi also has a pretty great school case tracker. Schools reported 1,118 COVID-19 outbreaks infecting 18,825 students and 3,600 teachers/staff in the month of August. In the past week, they reported 123 school-related outbreaks infecting 2,869 students and quarantining more than 15,000 students.

Thanks to Burbio's K-12 School Opening Tracker — which actively monitors 1,200 districts, including the 200 largest school districts in the U.S.— we have a national picture of school closures. More than 1,400 schools across 278 districts have closed in 35 states. Unfortunately, this is just the beginning as many schools in the West and Northeast have yet to start.

Last week there were 251,781 new pediatric cases in the United States. This is an all time record for the pandemic. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, kids represented 1 in 4 Americans testing positive for COVID-19 last week. Unfortunately, this isn’t a complete picture; it’s likely an underestimate because Texas only reports 3% of pediatric cases and Nebraska isn’t reporting COVID-19 data since June.

As COVID19 is introduced into pediatric populations, we should closely follow the capacity of pediatric ICUs’ (PICU). While the pediatric hospitalization rate is holding steady at 0.8% (1 of ~125 pediatric cases are hospitalized), this could really start adding up. If an estimated 34 million kids are susceptible to COVID19 and 33% of the hospitalized kids go to the PICU, that means we will need 6,800 PICU beds. The U.S. only has 4,500.

I tried to get an understanding of where we are at with PICU capacity. Unfortunately, the CDC and/or AAP and/or anyone else isn’t publicly reporting this data. The NYT ICU bed map is fantastic, but doesn’t allow the reader to display just pediatric ICU’s.

If we zoom on specific hospitals, we can start seeing the problem emerge. For example, Texas Children’s Hospital — a Houston hospital system that has more than 4.3 million annual patient encounters — currently has 150 COVID19 patients and reporting zero available PICU beds. Their PICU is at 100% capacity.

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18 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

It's like a less deadly version of the Darwin award...

The Darwin Award considers self-sterilisation through seriously bad ideas as valid grounds for awarding a Darwin Award (not just an honourary mention, which can be awarded for seriously bad ideas that nearly resulted in removal from the gene pool).

Unfortunately, if correctly-done research solidly concludes that ivermectin (in general or - more plausibly - just at animal dosage), it sounds like taking ivermectin to the point of self-sterilisation (without other factors to make it unusually foolish compared to others taking ivermectin) will not be valid because it is too common 😞

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FYI--new initiative from the President to provide at -cost home COVID testing kits:

To improve access to rapid tests for all consumers, top retailers that sell at-home, rapid COVID-19 tests—Walmart, Amazon, and Kroger—will offer to sell those tests at-cost for the next three months. This means that Americans will be able to buy these tests at their local retailers or online for up to 35 percent less starting by the end of this week. The Administration has also taken action so that Medicaid must cover at-home tests for free for beneficiaries, and that states should ensure that any tools they use to manage at-home testing do not establish arbitrary barriers for people seeking care.

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8 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

One the one hand, asking them to prove it reduces viral load, if they are saying it reduces viral load, makes sense. 

On the other hand, asking for the specific farm the grapefruit was picked and on what day, meh. And asking for safety data is weird - shouldn't that already exist if they were already on the market? OR, are they considered a supplement so never had FDA approval for the original intention, so having to start from scratch?

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Back to the lockdown question, we've decided we're about to the point with high cases and high hospitalizations that extra car trips will be off. We had to do this during the last surge as well, which really delayed my son getting his driving hours for his permit. Last time, the police were not doing as many traffic stops, and it got really hairy to drive at all. So far, they are out, and it makes a big difference in the number of reckless drivers.

DH still has quite a bit of driving time for work--last time, he worked in a facility very close to home. 

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12 hours ago, mommyoffive said:

School outbreaks and what it means for hospital capacity - by Katelyn Jetelina - Your Local Epidemiologist (substack.com)

Well, to no one’s surprise, we’re setting records for kids across the nation as schools re-open. We have no national COVID19 school surveillance program in place, so we’re relying on anecdotal evidence, state-level data, and data gurus in the private sector to piece together an epidemiological picture.

Mississippi also has a pretty great school case tracker. Schools reported 1,118 COVID-19 outbreaks infecting 18,825 students and 3,600 teachers/staff in the month of August. In the past week, they reported 123 school-related outbreaks infecting 2,869 students and quarantining more than 15,000 students.

Thanks to Burbio's K-12 School Opening Tracker — which actively monitors 1,200 districts, including the 200 largest school districts in the U.S.— we have a national picture of school closures. More than 1,400 schools across 278 districts have closed in 35 states. Unfortunately, this is just the beginning as many schools in the West and Northeast have yet to start.

Last week there were 251,781 new pediatric cases in the United States. This is an all time record for the pandemic. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, kids represented 1 in 4 Americans testing positive for COVID-19 last week. Unfortunately, this isn’t a complete picture; it’s likely an underestimate because Texas only reports 3% of pediatric cases and Nebraska isn’t reporting COVID-19 data since June.

As COVID19 is introduced into pediatric populations, we should closely follow the capacity of pediatric ICUs’ (PICU). While the pediatric hospitalization rate is holding steady at 0.8% (1 of ~125 pediatric cases are hospitalized), this could really start adding up. If an estimated 34 million kids are susceptible to COVID19 and 33% of the hospitalized kids go to the PICU, that means we will need 6,800 PICU beds. The U.S. only has 4,500.

I tried to get an understanding of where we are at with PICU capacity. Unfortunately, the CDC and/or AAP and/or anyone else isn’t publicly reporting this data. The NYT ICU bed map is fantastic, but doesn’t allow the reader to display just pediatric ICU’s.

If we zoom on specific hospitals, we can start seeing the problem emerge. For example, Texas Children’s Hospital — a Houston hospital system that has more than 4.3 million annual patient encounters — currently has 150 COVID19 patients and reporting zero available PICU beds. Their PICU is at 100% capacity.

It's getting harder and harder for me to be patient about kid vaccine approval. 

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3 hours ago, ktgrok said:

One the one hand, asking them to prove it reduces viral load, if they are saying it reduces viral load, makes sense. 

On the other hand, asking for the specific farm the grapefruit was picked and on what day, meh. And asking for safety data is weird - shouldn't that already exist if they were already on the market? OR, are they considered a supplement so never had FDA approval for the original intention, so having to start from scratch?

FDA approval of a drug includes approval of very strict manufacturing methods. They inspect factories, look very closely at supply chains, standardization of materials, etc., and any changes to manufacturing methods or materials must be submitted to the FDA in writing. This nasal spray company is basically saying "we just buy grapefruit seeds from some company, we have no idea where they're from or when they're harvested," which may be fine for an OTC nasal spray with no medical claims, but not for an FDA-approved drug.

I haven't read much about XClear in the last few months, but when I last looked into it, the evidence for efficacy consisted of an in vitro study showing it could kill the virus and a study with only 3 subjects (not blinded, no placebo). And I believe the guy who conducted that study was associated with Xclear in some way (consultant or former employee or something). It would be great if it works, but we've seen plenty of substances that seemed plausible in a test tube but were ineffective in proper RCTs. And if Xclear wants FDA approval as a drug, then they need to meet the manufacturing requirements that go along with that.

ETA: People can still buy Xclear over the counter, if they want to use it, so the lack of FDA approval isn't preventing anyone from getting or using it.

Edited by Corraleno
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17 hours ago, TexasProud said:

So it is homecoming week. Facebook is full of pep rallies at high school and junior high . Stands are packed inside the gyms, no masks.  A senior adult group is packed in a bus to go to Branson. Life goes on.  

Our positivity for the two counties is close to 20 percent.  One county 234 cases per 100,000 the other 175. 

Well, not for everyone. There will be deadly consequences for many. Needless deaths, at this point.

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School started this week here in upstate NY. I’m a teacher- sent home a sick kid this week, have another out on quarantine. My own child was quarantined today from a positive case in her classroom from the second day of school.   The first time she’s been in a classroom since March 2019 😞

People- keep your kids home if they have symptoms. 
It’s going to be another long year.

We didn’t even make it a full 5 days before we had kids with Covid in our rooms. At least we have mask mandates and testing or vaccinations required here. 

(we chose not to homeschool this year because my parents who were watching/ homeschooling the kids during the day can’t do it any longer, it’s just too much for them)

But going on year 3 of this from the teacher side is feeling overwhelming today. I really thought about taking a year leave of absence…

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2 hours ago, Dynamite5 said:

Well, not for everyone. There will be deadly consequences for many. Needless deaths, at this point.

The posted who said that has been careful and stressed about the pandemic. I think it was an expression of frustrated futility about how others view their libertine actions, not saying that she agrees. 

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7 hours ago, cintinative said:

FYI--new initiative from the President to provide at -cost home COVID testing kits:

To improve access to rapid tests for all consumers, top retailers that sell at-home, rapid COVID-19 tests—Walmart, Amazon, and Kroger—will offer to sell those tests at-cost for the next three months. This means that Americans will be able to buy these tests at their local retailers or online for up to 35 percent less starting by the end of this week. The Administration has also taken action so that Medicaid must cover at-home tests for free for beneficiaries, and that states should ensure that any tools they use to manage at-home testing do not establish arbitrary barriers for people seeking care.

This is fantastic news!! Ds came home from the first day of school with a fever of 102F and other symptoms. We ran a Binax—negative—but those are pricey—especially if you do the proper followup three days later.

ETA: his only outings in the past few weeks were to the dentist and to school for orientation—so I am feeling 0% excited about all of the exposures our kids are having right now. 
 

 

Edited by prairiewindmomma
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20 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Yes, the mob behavior aspect is what bothers me. What happens if the employers/ mob switches over to favoring being anti-mask, pro-let-er-rip (or whatever the current issue might change to)?  I might agree with the "mob" right now but I don't agree with mobbish behavior. 

In my estimation the "mob" is already where you fear they might be: anti-mask and pro-let-er-rip.

Nothing remotely mob-like about those in positions of authority acting to defend lives in alignment with the science.

There is no equivalence in the positions.

Bill

 

 

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17 hours ago, Spy Car said:

In my estimation the "mob" is already where you fear they might be: anti-mask and pro-let-er-rip.

Nothing remotely mob-like about those in positions of authority acting to defend lives in alignment with the science.

There is no equivalence in the positions.

Bill

 

 

I was referring to the mob behaviors of doxxing and publicly shaming people who behave badly. I never said or even intimated  that authorities putting into place and enforcing policies to protect public health was mob like. 

Edited by Jean in Newcastle
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