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Does anyone here make homemade Asian noodles?


Amira
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I'm making some different types of noodles right now, but I know there are a lot more out there I've never heard of. What types of noodles do you make at home? Here are a few that I've made or that are on my list to try. 

Laghman 
Thenthuk 
Youmian 
Yi mein
Liang pi
Biang biang
Silver pin noodles, either rolled or made with a spaetzle maker
Ashlyamfu (a noodle dish, but it has two types of noodles)
Shivit oshi (dill noodles with sauce)
Steamed rice noodles

Edited by Amira
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No. I am lazy and just buy off the asian supermarkets.

However, I am guessing laghman is the Chinese noodles 拉面 (lamian). That takes a lot of skills. I like the demo in this YouTube video on lamian and soba 

 

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I was actually going to come here the other day to ask if anyone knows a good place to get different types of Asian noodles online, because my local options are a bit pricier than I like and more limited than I want. 
But now I guess the answer is to learn to make my own. I’m only a little bit mad about it, lol. 

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1 hour ago, Katy said:

I never have, but I’m listening because it would be fun to try if you find some good recipes. 

I’ve made Central Asian laghman often, but this is a similar, easier recipe that makes a smaller amount of pulled noodles.  https://www.thrillist.com.au/eat/nation/xian-famous-foods-recipes-noodles-bone-broth-chili-oil/

The liang pi was a lot easier than I thought it would be. https://thewoksoflife.com/liangpi-noodles/

I can’t remember exactly which youmian recipe I’ve used, but there’s not much variation.  I still haven‘t gotten the hang of smearing the dough though.
 

 

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1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

No. I am lazy and just buy off the asian supermarkets.

However, I am guessing laghman is the Chinese noodles 拉面 (lamian). That takes a lot of skills. I like the demo in this YouTube video on lamian and soba 

 

I’ve watched this video many times because it’s just so beautiful. I’ve never tried pulling noodles this way, especially after learning the “ladies’ method” for laghman in Central Asia, but maybe someday I’ll try it.

I do buy noodles when I’m living in a place I can get them, but usually I’m not.

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From your list I only make laghman because that is what I like to eat. Oh, and I make chow fun noodles, which would be in your steamed rice noodle category. I’ve never heard of many in your list - I’ll have to look them up and give them a try. Thanks!

eta as to what types of noodles I make otherwise, generally just your basic Italian noodles. Also spaetzle, which is hands-down the best noodle for beginners. It doesn’t get any easier than spaetzle!

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25 minutes ago, Amira said:

I’ve watched this video many times because it just so beautiful. I’ve never tried pulling noodles this way, especially after learning the “ladies’ method” for laghman in Central Asia, but maybe someday I’ll try it.

I do buy noodles when I’m living in a place I can get them, but usually I’m not.

What’s the “ladies’ method” for laghman? 

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3 minutes ago, bibiche said:

What’s the “ladies’ method” for laghman? 

It’s similar to the yi mein recipe I linked above (the first link I posted).  You coil the dough into long ropes and oil them and let them rest, then pull them in smaller batches.  How do you make laghman?

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Subscribing.

Just watched the video for pulling laghman. Looks fun.

Other than some soba noodles that I made in the distant past, I've never made Asian noodles.

Surprising, as I have made pasta  for many decades.

Bill

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17 minutes ago, bibiche said:

From your list I only make laghman because that is what I like to eat. Oh, and I make chow fun noodles, which would be in your steamed rice noodle category. I’ve never heard of many in your list - I’ll have to look them up and give them a try. Thanks!

eta as to what types of noodles I make otherwise, generally just your basic Italian noodles. Also spaetzle, which is hands-down the best noodle for beginners. It doesn’t get any easier than spaetzle!

Ah ha. I swear on my life that (feeling very lazy today in the heat) not more than 10 minutes ago I asked my wife if she knew where the spaetzle maker was as I want to make some "pasta" but with minimal effort.

Bill

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2 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Hand torn noodles (Mee Hoon Kueh) is the easy one because it’s meant to be odd shaped pieces.

The recipes are just different Chinese provincial styles

http://nasilemaklover.blogspot.com/2010/06/mee-hoon-kueh-hand-pulled-noodles.html

https://rasamalaysia.com/pan-mee-recipe/

 

These are exactly the kind of thing I’m looking for.  Thank you!  I just don’t know the names to search for.

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21 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Korean

ddeokbokki (cylinder shape) and ddeokguk (oval shape) http://crazykoreancooking.com/recipe/rice-cake-tube (webpage has lots of ads though) 

KalGukSu   http://www .aeriskitchen.com/2017/09/homemade-knife-noodles/

I actually can get garaeddeok here, from a Korean friend.  But I’d never thought to make them myself.  And the Kalguksu looks easy. Thank you!

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3 hours ago, Amira said:

It’s similar to the yi mein recipe I linked above (the first link I posted).  You coil the dough into long ropes and oil them and let them rest, then pull them in smaller batches.  How do you make laghman?

Thanks. I make them similar to that, though I never refrigerate the dough. I went into the kitchen of a Central Asian restaurant once to learn their secrets, but they made them exactly the same way that I did. 😆 

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44 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Do use Asian noodle people use lye water with your noodles?

Bill

I don’t because I am not aiming for restaurant consistency. However, pottasche (penghui 蓬灰, K2CO3) is what is more often used for chinese hand pulled noodles if desired.

ETA: I don’t trust the quality control for lye water (NaOH) and I don’t wish to make my own. 

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I buy all my noodles from the huge asian stores in my community. But, during the lockdown, I learned to make Ramen noodles! They turned out pretty good! I used this video for the recipe:

 

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55 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

I don’t because I am not aiming for restaurant consistency. However, pottasche (penghui 蓬灰, K2CO3) is what is more often used for chinese hand pulled noodles if desired.

ETA: I don’t trust the quality control for lye water (NaOH) and I don’t wish to make my own. 

Potash as in real potash (from the ashes of wood fires) or refined potassium carbonate?

I've read an online source that suggests (link below) in lieu of using (potentially hard to find) potassium carbonate that one can bake sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) on a tray at 200°F/95°C for an hour to transform it into  sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and then use the same way to promote "chewiness" in the noodles.

Bill

https://www.diversivore.com/homemade-chinese-egg-noodles/

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28 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Potash as in real potash (from the ashes of wood fires) or refined potassium carbonate?

I won’t DIY. You could probably use this, especially if you also like baking lebkuchen 

https://www.amazon.com/Edora-Pottasche-Potash/dp/B00NU7S0R0

You could also try using nutritional yeast as a substitute 

https://www.seriouseats.com/homemade-hand-pulled-noodles-lamian

“For optimal extensibility, I found nutritional yeast to be effective between 5 and 8 percent of the total flour weight in my tests. As the protein content of flour increased (up to King Arthur bread flour), I could dial up the amount of nutritional yeast to the top end of that range without compromising structure. As the protein content decreased (to say, Pillsbury cake flour), less yeast was required, and additional yeast made the dough too sticky and slack*.

*If you’re curious, nutritional yeast contains 2.5 milligrams of glutathione per gram.

A Note on Alkali 

What about all that hype around penghui and kansui? For this recipe, I noticed that alkali did make my noodles chewier; but it also made pulling noodles more difficult, and the cooked noodle shape was wavy, curled, and uneven. My noodles had plenty of chew already from high-gluten bread flour, and the added benefit in texture wasn’t worth the regression in dough handling and shaping. In the interest of keeping things simple, I decided to leave alkali out. You could definitely experiment with adding some alkali to your noodle dough to improve chew, but keep in mind that it will negatively impact extensibility.“

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8 hours ago, bibiche said:

Thanks. I make them similar to that, though I never refrigerate the dough. I went into the kitchen of a Central Asian restaurant once to learn their secrets, but they made them exactly the same way that I did. 😆 

Yeah, I don't refrigerate them either and didn't bother to do so when I made the longevity noodles.

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5 hours ago, Spy Car said:

Potash as in real potash (from the ashes of wood fires) or refined potassium carbonate?

I've read an online source that suggests (link below) in lieu of using (potentially hard to find) potassium carbonate that one can bake sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) on a tray at 200°F/95°C for an hour to transform it into  sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and then use the same way to promote "chewiness" in the noodles.

Bill

https://www.diversivore.com/homemade-chinese-egg-noodles/

I've read about this too and am thinking of trying it.  But mostly I just steer clear of recipes that call for some kind of alkali because I can make noodles I'm happy with without it so it doesn't seem to be worth the extra effort.

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10 hours ago, Amira said:

I've read about this too and am thinking of trying it.  But mostly I just steer clear of recipes that call for some kind of alkali because I can make noodles I'm happy with without it so it doesn't seem to be worth the extra effort.

I was just curious if it was the alkalinization that gave some Asian noodles the characteristic "chewiness" that makes them different that Italian pasta?

Bill

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14 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

I was just curious if it was the alkalinization that gave some Asian noodles the characteristic "chewiness" that makes them different that Italian pasta?

Bill

To me, pulled noodles like the ones I’ve made are pretty chewy and definitely different from Italian pasta, even without the alkali. I’m making the biang biang noodles right now and I’m curious if they’ll be chewy.

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23 minutes ago, Amira said:

To me, pulled noodles like the ones I’ve made are pretty chewy and definitely different from Italian pasta, even without the alkali. I’m making the biang biang noodles right now and I’m curious if they’ll be chewy.

Good to know. You definitely have me intrigued.

I did end up making spaetzle last night, as I was feeling uncommonly lazy in the heat, but did mill/sift fresh flour (which helped me feel less slothful). LOL.

Bill

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I once watched a Queer Eye episode where they gave this guy a pasta machine. I didn’t know these existed! Apparently you just add the ingredients and it extrudes noodles. Sometimes I dream about that machine. 🛌 💭 🍜 

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The biang biang noodles were really, really good.  And easy.  Probably the easiest homemade noodle I’ve done.  The recipe I posted above makes way more than 3 servings in my opinion.  I divided the dough into 12 pieces that were about 65 grams each and three three of us ate half of it, so I’ll make the noodles again in a day or two. 

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14 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Good to know. You definitely have me intrigued.

I did end up making spaetzle last night, as I was feeling uncommonly lazy in the heat, but did mill/sift fresh flour (which helped me feel less slothful). LOL.

Bill

I always make spätzle with freshly ground flour. It’s so good.

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18 minutes ago, Amira said:

I was hoping you’d pop in, Rosie! Your post about youmian a while ago was what got me started on this again.

I still haven't tried them myself!
Maybe when my next cooking mood strikes. 🙂

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7 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

I still haven't tried them myself!
Maybe when my next cooking mood strikes. 🙂

I have to wait for cooking moods too, which is why I’m trying to take advantage of this one. 

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