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ENG 10: HS Writing & Grammar help!!


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Hello!

I am trying to narrow down English 10 .... My son completed the Elegant Essay and Research Writing with Co-op for 9th grade. That went very well for him, but he needs more of that sort of structure. We also completed Fix It Book 2 Robin Hood and American literature at home. 

It all seemed a bit choppy, which took more time. I'm wondering for 10th grade if I should stick with Fix It Grammar and let him work through Level C of IEW Writing Intensive OR go with something like BJU Writing & Grammar... adding in our World Literature separately.?

This is my last high schooler.... he's not overly academic... Super hands on kid. He's also pursuing law enforcement in the future. I want him to write and read well AND be articulate before enrolling in CC for junior year.  

Please help me! Any advice for a not so choppy English year would be very much appreciated.

Thanks in advance. 😉

Edited by Murrayshire
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  • Murrayshire changed the title to ENG 10: BJU Writing & Grammar or What?
  • Murrayshire changed the title to ENG 10: HS Writing & Grammar help!!

I can tell you that strong knowledge of grammar and syntax are truly important in law enforcement, especially in reporting writing. For that reason alone, I'd recommend Rod & Staff English which is solid in both. However, if your son would like the workbook style and videos, then BJU Writing and Grammar seems like the next runner-up, though I don't have any personal experience with it. If your son enjoys writing, then I'd probably recommend Writing and Rhetoric or Rhetoric Alive! by Classical Academic Press, but the aforementioned get the job done without having to add anything. I've never used IEW, as it never appealed to us.

Also, I found thread that you may be interested in reading: 

 

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On 6/21/2021 at 1:11 PM, cintinative said:

Have you tried calling IEW?

Do you own SWI-C?  If not, you would be buying their new SSS-C

Another option would be:

High school essay intensive (1 semester) and Advanced communication series (1 semester). 

I would call them though--they will know best where to place you.

https://iew.com/sites/default/files/images/IEW_Pathway.jpg

 

Yes, I have spoken with them and they suggested SSS-C Part 1 even though he has gone through the EE and Research writing with an IEW instructor. I will look into your suggestions a little more. Thank you!

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On 6/21/2021 at 12:32 PM, Mom21 said:

I can tell you that strong knowledge of grammar and syntax are truly important in law enforcement, especially in reporting writing. For that reason alone, I'd recommend Rod & Staff English which is solid in both. However, if your son would like the workbook style and videos, then BJU Writing and Grammar seems like the next runner-up, though I don't have any personal experience with it. If your son enjoys writing, then I'd probably recommend Writing and Rhetoric or Rhetoric Alive! by Classical Academic Press, but the aforementioned get the job done without having to add anything. I've never used IEW, as it never appealed to us.

Also, I found thread that you may be interested in reading: 

 

Thank you and I will check out that thread!

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Power in Your Hands (Sharon Watson) -- I'll just throw in this possible suggestion because it is gentle, written to the student (so a lot can be done independently if the student hates having to have "mom involved" in Writing 😉 ), but especially because it covers a wide variety of types of writing, including some that the student will encounter in real life.

A lot of my homeschool co-op class students are not headed to a 4-year degree, so I try and cover a variety of writing that will best equip them for whatever their future may hold. For me, that means: basic paragraph construction; how to build a logical supported argument for a thesis (which may take the for of a contention, opinion, analysis result, etc.); as well as how to revise (add, improve, rearrange), and proof-edit (all the "clean-up" corrections), in order to end up with a solid, error-free piece of writing. 

I also try and include a variety of assignments, some to specifically help them for whatever their future holds:
- create a resume
- write a cover letter (or a business letter of some type)
- give an oral presentation to the class
- "process" (how-to) paper -- helps with ability of explaining how to do or make something, give directions, or "teach"/instruct
- personal narrative essay -- helps with the ability to share in detail about what happened and the "take-away" or "lesson learned" or what was important about the event

One thing that would be very helpful for someone going into law enforcement is report-writing. My DH was a captain in the fire dept. and had to write up a report for every single call -- which is something police officers have to do as well. Reports are summaries of what was encountered on a call and what steps were taken by the emergency service personnel; it's critical to be concise and accurate, as well as provide enough details about the call, because the report is what is used when the occasional call ends up in court for some reason. DH did not have to go to court more than 2-3 times in his career, but his report was all he had to help him remember what happened and what he did on that call. Hence the need for accuracy and details. 

I'm sure police officers end up testifying in court FAR more frequently, so being able to summarize, *think* logically, build a logical argument of support, and understand what are important vs. unimportant details would be important writing skills for law enforcement, so anything you can do in the next few years to strengthen those skills would be of help for a future career.

Just my 2 cents worth! 😉 Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Lori D. said:

Power in Your Hands (Sharon Watson) -- I'll just throw in this possible suggestion because it is gentle, written to the student (so a lot can be done independently if the student hates having to have "mom involved" in Writing 😉 ), but especially because it covers a wide variety of types of writing, including some that the student will encounter in real life.

A lot of my homeschool co-op class students are not headed to a 4-year degree, so I try and cover a variety of writing that will best equip them for whatever their future may hold. For me, that means: basic paragraph construction; how to build a logical supported argument for a thesis (which may take the for of a contention, opinion, analysis result, etc.); as well as how to revise (add, improve, rearrange), and proof-edit (all the "clean-up" corrections), in order to end up with a solid, error-free piece of writing. 

I also try and include a variety of assignments, some to specifically help them for whatever their future holds:
- create a resume
- write a cover letter (or a business letter of some type)
- give an oral presentation to the class
- "process" (how-to) paper -- helps with ability of explaining how to do or make something, give directions, or "teach"/instruct
- personal narrative essay -- helps with the ability to share in detail about what happened and the "take-away" or "lesson learned" or what was important about the event

One thing that would be very helpful for someone going into law enforcement is report-writing. My DH was a captain in the fire dept. and had to write up a report for every single call -- which is something police officers have to do as well. Reports are summaries of what was encountered on a call and what steps were taken by the emergency service personnel; it's critical to be concise and accurate, as well as provide enough details about the call, because the report is what is used when the occasional call ends up in court for some reason. DH did not have to go to court more than 2-3 times in his career, but his report was all he had to help him remember what happened and what he did on that call. Hence the need for accuracy and details. 

I'm sure police officers end up testifying in court FAR more frequently, so being able to summarize, *think* logically, build a logical argument of support, and understand what are important vs. unimportant details would be important writing skills for law enforcement, so anything you can do in the next few years to strengthen those skills would be of help for a future career.

Just my 2 cents worth! 😉 Warmest regards, Lori D.

Lori! It is so fitting that you would mention the report writing/police reporting/court.... my son is currently in the Explorers groups (ages 14-20) through the police department. At one of his meetings, they had a DA visit and staged a mock court. One of the explorers was questioned like he was on the stand... he had to remember all the details of his report. Lots of memorization comes into play here, too!  ** Edit to add:  they actually had to write a report for homework based on a situation they were given. 

I do have the teacher book for "Power in Your Hands" sitting on my shelf that I didn't even think about. My middle child used this at co-op 8th/9th grade, but someone else taught it. I'll see if I can get my hands on the student workbook to look through, or let him look at it to see if this will work. I'm still in that weird choppy route if I go with Power in Your Hands... writing book, grammar book, literature guides..... Trying to consolidate the best I can for him. He has quite the load this year!

Thanks a bunch! 

Edited by Murrayshire
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