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Growing microgreens


sheryl
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Maybe 20 years ago or so I used to grow sprouts.  About 5 years ago I stumbled across microgreens at Earthfare and WF.   I'll continue to happily buy them if I can't grow my own but I'd like to know if it's possible to do that.

Have you grown mircrogreens (thicker and beefier)?   Not referring to the thin, hair-like sprouts.  I buy and would want to grow: kale, broccoli, arugula, sunflower to name a few.

If you grow or have grown these, do you have a website you could forward?

Thanks!

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I use Hamama currently too, but have also used a mason jar with a mesh lid.  Both work.  The Hamama has more on-going costs, since you need to buy the seed quilt.  In my climate (very dry) I have trouble finding the right moisture level for the growing sprouts, but if I pay close attention it works well.  If I don't, they either wilt or rot.  

Here's a site with a lot of info and items to consider: https://sproutpeople.org/sprout-kits/

 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks!  I used to grow sprouts but now I'm interested in the microgreens.  I buy "City Roots" brand from WF.  I have a growers lamp but the sprouts needed to be partially in dark conditions.  

Edited by sheryl
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I grow microgreens. I use food take-out containers for the grow tray (I got a stack of them at the grocery store for about $20) and coconut coir as the grow medium. 

We got our seeds from Mountain Valley seed company.  It's a big brassica mix of seeds. 

Growing is pretty easy. They do need to sit in darkness for a few days. We used to watch a lady in YouTube called Tikki O for instructions on growing. It's a family-friendly channel, so no worries about anything weird popping up. 

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I’ve used Hamama for the past few years. It is pricier than other methods, but the extra expense is worth it to me because it is so much less hassle. I currently have twelve trays in my micro garden in my sunroom. I don’t do the subscription, I just buy a big stock up box of quilts a few times a year.

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Posted (edited)

I was going to try this last year but never got around to it. Now that you mention it, maybe I should try it this year.

One tip I recall was putting weight on the seeds to start out, such as putting another tray on top of the soil.  Someone did a side-by-side comparison of various growing conditions. Hmm, let's see ... it wasn't this website, but this one seems to be discussing the same issues:  https://totalgardener.com/which-microgreens-need-weight/#:~:text=Using weights for microgreens is,moisture and hold the weight.

 

Edited to add:  Aha, here's the website I was looking at last year https://homemicrogreens.com/cover-microgreen-seeds/ (Also, I adore reading websites about experiments like this -- almost as fun as reading curriculum reviews)

Edited by GailV
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I used to grow sunflower lettuce in seed trays back when I had somewhere suitable. I found they grew best in indirect light. They did fine in a sunny window at one house, and in a shade house at another place. I bought them from the stockfeed shop.

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We are just now trying microgreens. I bought a kit that has 3 cakes of growing medium and 3 types of seed. The instructions say it takes 7-10 days so we'll grow them one after the other in the kitchen window and see how it goes. This photo was taken yesterday and it is day 8 of broccoli seeds. I'll be harvesting them today or tomorrow and topping our salads with them.

If we like eating the microgreens, I'll use peat moss as our growing medium and buy more seeds.

image.thumb.png.6c7dfc697e6b6b35423a9e87658a13fe.png

 

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16 hours ago, MissLemon said:

I grow microgreens. I use food take-out containers for the grow tray (I got a stack of them at the grocery store for about $20) and coconut coir as the grow medium. 

We got our seeds from Mountain Valley seed company.  It's a big brassica mix of seeds. 

Growing is pretty easy. They do need to sit in darkness for a few days. We used to watch a lady in YouTube called Tikki O for instructions on growing. It's a family-friendly channel, so no worries about anything weird popping up. 

Thanks!  I'm needing to brush up on "how" to do this.  I'm confused though.  Can I grow microgreens from "any" seed packet?  

16 hours ago, Pen said:

Yes imo getting them out into good sun once they sprout is key to beefiness. If there’s not much light they grow spindly. 

Thanks! What have you grown?  

15 hours ago, Selkie said:

I’ve used Hamama for the past few years. It is pricier than other methods, but the extra expense is worth it to me because it is so much less hassle. I currently have twelve trays in my micro garden in my sunroom. I don’t do the subscription, I just buy a big stock up box of quilts a few times a year.

Same question as I asked MissLemon, can I buy "any" vegetable seed packet?  So, broccoli from seed?  Lettuces from seeds?

11 hours ago, GailV said:

I was going to try this last year but never got around to it. Now that you mention it, maybe I should try it this year.

One tip I recall was putting weight on the seeds to start out, such as putting another tray on top of the soil.  Someone did a side-by-side comparison of various growing conditions. Hmm, let's see ... it wasn't this website, but this one seems to be discussing the same issues:  https://totalgardener.com/which-microgreens-need-weight/#:~:text=Using weights for microgreens is,moisture and hold the weight.

 

Edited to add:  Aha, here's the website I was looking at last year https://homemicrogreens.com/cover-microgreen-seeds/ (Also, I adore reading websites about experiments like this -- almost as fun as reading curriculum reviews)

Am going to watch the video now.  Thanks!

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11 hours ago, Rosie_0801 said:

I used to grow sunflower lettuce in seed trays back when I had somewhere suitable. I found they grew best in indirect light. They did fine in a sunny window at one house, and in a shade house at another place. I bought them from the stockfeed shop.

Yes, sunflower is on my list!  Did you buy the seeds - just a regular pack of seeds or is there a special seed to go into microgreens?

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58 minutes ago, CTVKath said:

We are just now trying microgreens. I bought a kit that has 3 cakes of growing medium and 3 types of seed. The instructions say it takes 7-10 days so we'll grow them one after the other in the kitchen window and see how it goes. This photo was taken yesterday and it is day 8 of broccoli seeds. I'll be harvesting them today or tomorrow and topping our salads with them.

If we like eating the microgreens, I'll use peat moss as our growing medium and buy more seeds.

image.thumb.png.6c7dfc697e6b6b35423a9e87658a13fe.png

 

Is a "kit" necessary?  My reason for growing is 1) pleasure of doing so and yielding "fresh" greens, and 2) not spend $4 for a small container from store.   How many seeds are needed to yield 1 pint dry?  I can't find the answer to this.  The box of microgreens I buy is 1 pint.  I'm wondering how many teaspoons or whatnot of seeds I'll need and what that cost would be.  For a savings, the seeds/process would need to be lower than that to enjoy a savings.  

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1 hour ago, sheryl said:

Thanks!  I'm needing to brush up on "how" to do this.  I'm confused though.  Can I grow microgreens from "any" seed packet?  
 

I would only use untreated seeds.  And personally organic ones - or seeds that I have picked myself.  
 

there are seeds sold specifically for micro greens 

it is also possible to get things like peas (not split!) or raw sunflower seeds from a bin in bulk section of store and instead of making a pea soup or eating sunflower seeds as a snack grow them

 

I had been told sunflower seeds had to be in shells to grow but I have found that as long as they are raw and plain (no salt etc) they can grow. 
 

I have grown both peas and sunflowers greens that way

and mixtures of micro greens from seeds sold for that purpose

also micro lettuces from my own saved seeds when lettuce has bolted

 

im currently trying dandelions from picked dandelion fluff

 

1 hour ago, sheryl said:

Thanks! What have you grown?  

 

 

 

 


 

Same question as I asked MissLemon, can I buy "any" vegetable seed packet?  So, broccoli from seed?  Lettuces from seeds?

Am going to watch the video now.  Thanks!

 

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9 hours ago, sheryl said:

Yes, sunflower is on my list!  Did you buy the seeds - just a regular pack of seeds or is there a special seed to go into microgreens?

All unhulled sunflower seeds grow into sunflowers, given the right conditions. I remember someone telling me the black shelled ones have a higher oil content, though, so that's what I usually bought. It's the same as growing pretty much anything, but you eat them earlier. Sprinkle on dirt, cover up with some more for larger seeds, spray water on them so they don't dry out, and eat before they develop any true leaves. 

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10 hours ago, sheryl said:

Is a "kit" necessary?  

No, a "kit" is not necessary. I just bought a $10 kit to try it out and see if I liked it and if the microgreens would grow in my kitchen window - which is the only spot I'd do them in.

I'm going to use peat moss as the planting medium because I've got about a half bag of that (1 cubic foot) from planting in the yard and that will last a good while. For seeds, I'm going to try regular garden seeds after I finish the ones that came with my kit. If the regular garden seeds do ok, I'll try bulk seeds from the Feed and Seed next.

Do you watch YouTube videos? That's where I've been watching videos to learn what to do. Sorry - I have no idea on how many seeds you'd need to yield a pint of microgreens. You might have to figure that out by trial and error until you find the yield you want.

Good luck! I've enjoyed watching my little bag of broccoli microgreens grow.

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On 5/31/2021 at 11:03 AM, Pen said:

I would only use untreated seeds.  And personally organic ones - or seeds that I have picked myself.  
 

there are seeds sold specifically for micro greens 

it is also possible to get things like peas (not split!) or raw sunflower seeds from a bin in bulk section of store and instead of making a pea soup or eating sunflower seeds as a snack grow them

 

I had been told sunflower seeds had to be in shells to grow but I have found that as long as they are raw and plain (no salt etc) they can grow. 
 

I have grown both peas and sunflowers greens that way

and mixtures of micro greens from seeds sold for that purpose

also micro lettuces from my own saved seeds when lettuce has bolted

 

im currently trying dandelions from picked dandelion fluff

 

 

This was helpful, Pen.  So, "garden veggie seeds" are different than "microgreen-specific seeds?  I'm referring to my lettuces as microgreens (kale, arugula, etc).  They are microgreen lettuces, perhaps!  Do you have a link on harvesting lettuce seeds once bolted to re - plant?  

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On 5/31/2021 at 7:36 PM, CTVKath said:

No, a "kit" is not necessary. I just bought a $10 kit to try it out and see if I liked it and if the microgreens would grow in my kitchen window - which is the only spot I'd do them in.

I'm going to use peat moss as the planting medium because I've got about a half bag of that (1 cubic foot) from planting in the yard and that will last a good while. For seeds, I'm going to try regular garden seeds after I finish the ones that came with my kit. If the regular garden seeds do ok, I'll try bulk seeds from the Feed and Seed next.

Do you watch YouTube videos? That's where I've been watching videos to learn what to do. Sorry - I have no idea on how many seeds you'd need to yield a pint of microgreens. You might have to figure that out by trial and error until you find the yield you want.

Good luck! I've enjoyed watching my little bag of broccoli microgreens grow.

I need the trays, soil and seeds.  I think I have regular good-quality potted plant potting soil and that probably won't work.  Let us know how the regular garden seeds grow.  We've grown organic produce on/off for decades.  We're not experts but I can't imagine why regular garden seeds wouldn't work.  

I do watch YB tutorials.  Do you have a link to share? Broccoli is on my list too!  

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, sheryl said:

This was helpful, Pen.  So, "garden veggie seeds" are different than "microgreen-specific seeds?  I'm referring to my lettuces as microgreens (kale, arugula, etc).  They are microgreen lettuces, perhaps!  Do you have a link on harvesting lettuce seeds once bolted to re - plant?  

Veggie seeds may be treated which personally I would not want much as I would not want chemical  Treatments on my lawn (if I had a lawn). 
 

And they may be $1-5 for a small pack of seeds whereas ones meant for growing micro greens or sprouts may be available by the 1/4 pound to whole pound at much more reasonable cost .  It doesn’t matter for micro greens what their final

plant quality will be so long as they can make small quick edibles

 

If lettuce or other plants I have bolt I just keep the seeds. Usually in refrigerator. (eta: garden lettuces if growing several types near each other especially is likely to have been cross pollinated and not necessarily make good full size lettuces, but is likely okay for micro greens. 
 

There are probably sites about it, but I just do it. I do it more or less Like picking a dandelion seed ball (if you  are familiar with that?) and instead of blowing on it, put it in a baggie.
 

  It takes quite a lot of seeds to make micro greens so that’s a reason to save ones own or buy a substantial amount.  A typical seed pack isn’t probably enough to make a substantial covering for a little 3x3” type pot. 

Edited by Pen
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On 6/4/2021 at 6:41 PM, Pen said:

Veggie seeds may be treated which personally I would not want much as I would not want chemical  Treatments on my lawn (if I had a lawn). 
This point and the following are ones I'm trying to understand!

But, organic seeds would not be treated, right?  Or, Heirloom?
 

And they may be $1-5 for a small pack of seeds whereas ones meant for growing micro greens or sprouts may be available by the 1/4 pound to whole pound at much more reasonable cost .  It doesn’t matter for micro greens what their final

plant quality will be so long as they can make small quick edibles
I'm trying to understand this.  LOL!  One link suggests it's not the seed but the growing time.  IOW, take a seed and it first becomes a sprout, next - microgreen, next, next...       

 

If lettuce or other plants I have bolt I just keep the seeds. Usually in refrigerator. (eta: garden lettuces if growing several types near each other especially is likely to have been cross pollinated and not necessarily make good full size lettuces, but is likely okay for micro greens. 
Great, to harvest seeds for next planting. Can you do that imediately?
 

There are probably sites about it, but I just do it. I do it more or less Like picking a dandelion seed ball (if you  are familiar with that?) and instead of blowing on it, put it in a baggie.
So, in a leaf such as a sunflower microgreen, do you dissect the leaf to remove seeds?  I can see this being time-consuming as you mentioned
 

  It takes quite a lot of seeds to make micro greens so that’s a reason to save ones own or buy a substantial amount.  A typical seed pack isn’t probably enough to make a substantial covering for a little 3x3” type pot. 

 

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This point and the following are ones I'm trying to understand!

But, organic seeds would not be treated, right?  Or, Heirloom?


Note, I am speaking my replies into the phone and sometimes transcribes in correctly I think you can probably understand well enough.


Anything which fits organic certification standards can be done w certified organic seeds   From the point of you Viewof treatment, most organic seeds probably are safe.

it may be that you need to experiment and do it yourself in order to understand what I’m trying to tell you Regarding spacehow much it takes to make a quantity of micro greens. sometimes people have to learn from their own mistakes and it doesn’t help to try to learn from somebody else’s knowledge or experience. You may need to make it really your own in order to “get it“. Furthermore what I have found, may be different than what happens for you. So I may have found that a small organic seed pack of seeds is not that goodFor making micro greens but you may find that it’s excellent

so why not just go ahead and give it a try if that’s what you want to do.

 

 

heirloom u need to look up for yourself - I don’t think treatment has anything to do with the term heirloom

 

 

 


 

And they may be $1-5 for a small pack of seeds whereas ones meant for growing micro greens or sprouts may be available by the 1/4 pound to whole pound at much more reasonable cost .  It doesn’t matter for micro greens what their final

plant quality will be so long as they can make small quick edibles
I'm trying to understand this.  LOL!  One link suggests it's not the seed but the growing time.  IOW, take a seed and it first becomes a sprout, next - microgreen, next, next...       

———-

Well yes that’s true in a sense, but you’re paying usually when you’re getting a seed pack for seeds that were carefully grown for the purposes of growing a finished whatever it is that is of interest so for example a finished broccoli head if you were growing a broccoli plant and not for creating in particular a lot of micro greens of broccoli.

Or in the case of lettuce perhaps for making a nice big pretty lettuce.  One that doesn’t bolt quickly and perhaps one that has nice crunch in the case of certain types of lettuce or softness if it’s a butter lettuce. various qualities for the finished lettuce are being chosen for a pack of lettuce seeds and that’s OK if you want to use that but you don’t really need that for micro greens.

So what I have found this in my saved lettuces because I grow a bunch of different types of lettuce is furthermorewhen I try to save their seats seeds if I try to grow them individually to make a new lettuce I don’t end up with a particularly good final result most of the time.  I might end up with something that crosses two qualities in a way that doesn’t turn out especially good. if I were wanting to breed new lettuces that could be interesting because I could be choosing my own best resulting plants’ seeds that I find are good for my area and that I do like the taste of and other qualities of — but that’s not really what I’m trying to do and so I have found that those seeds don’t work super wellDon’t work super well for making new full size lettuces.   but work just fine if they’re part of micro greens.


Answer below picked up your purple I don’t have any way to change that here.

Sometimes seeds have come about from a mixture of several plants that are near each other and the resulting plant will have the worst qualities of both parents not the best qualities of both parents from the point of somebody wanting to eat it later . That tends not to be as big of a problem for micro greens. in addition there may be qualities that are superior for full grown plants that are not excellent for micro greens were some seeds actually intended for micro greens may be better.
 

For example, a very hard strong thick stem may be excellent to support a heavy seed head of a sunflower, whereas a more tender fragile type of stem may be better from the point of eating the greens

 

If lettuce or other plants I have bolt I just keep the seeds. Usually in refrigerator. (eta: garden lettuces if growing several types near each other especially is likely to have been cross pollinated and not necessarily make good full size lettuces, but is likely okay for micro greens. 
Great, to harvest seeds for next planting. Can you do that imediately?
 

once plants have gone to seed you can usually harvest the seeds as soon as they are mature and most such seeds can be planted immediately after harvest. There are a few types of seeds that need to wait in special conditions such as cold for example for a certain length of time before they can sprout.For example I am currently in the process of quotes stratifying” seeds of particular types of trees to be ready to plant in about two months. But in my experience most regular greens  don’t need that

 

 

There are probably sites about it, but I just do it. I do it more or less Like picking a dandelion seed ball (if you  are familiar with that?) and instead of blowing on it, put it in a baggie.
So, in a leaf such as a sunflower microgreen, do you dissect the leaf to remove seeds?  I can see this being time-consuming as you mentioned
 

 
I’m not sure if this is a serious question to be honest!!!!
 

I’ll try to answer it is if it’s serious but I suspect you’re pulling my leg that you don’t understand 

Sunflower seeds — have you seen any In your life? Like a pack in a store? They initially come in shells, shells which when growing are located in the big flower head. There are no seeds to be harvested until there is a mature flower that has gone to seed.  
 

Your suggestion of dissecting microgreen  leaf to remove the seeds Would be somewhat like the idea of dissecting an infant child in order to remove the sperm or eggs  for the next generation — Possibly in either case you could clone cells from a baby or Clone cells cellsfrom an immature micro green leaf but there are no seeds  In a micro green leaf 

 

It takes quite a lot of seeds to make micro greens so that’s a reason to save ones own or buy a substantial amount.  A typical seed pack isn’t probably enough to make a substantial covering for a little 3x3” type pot. 

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On 6/7/2021 at 10:08 AM, Pen said:

 


This point and the following are ones I'm trying to understand!

But, organic seeds would not be treated, right?  Or, Heirloom?


Note, I am speaking my replies into the phone and sometimes transcribes in correctly I think you can probably understand well enough.


Anything which fits organic certification standards can be done w certified organic seeds   From the point of you Viewof treatment, most organic seeds probably are safe.

it may be that you need to experiment and do it yourself in order to understand what I’m trying to tell you Regarding spacehow much it takes to make a quantity of micro greens. sometimes people have to learn from their own mistakes and it doesn’t help to try to learn from somebody else’s knowledge or experience. You may need to make it really your own in order to “get it“. Furthermore what I have found, may be different than what happens for you. So I may have found that a small organic seed pack of seeds is not that goodFor making micro greens but you may find that it’s excellent

so why not just go ahead and give it a try if that’s what you want to do.

 

 

heirloom u need to look up for yourself - I don’t think treatment has anything to do with the term heirloom

 

 

 


 

And they may be $1-5 for a small pack of seeds whereas ones meant for growing micro greens or sprouts may be available by the 1/4 pound to whole pound at much more reasonable cost .  It doesn’t matter for micro greens what their final

plant quality will be so long as they can make small quick edibles
I'm trying to understand this.  LOL!  One link suggests it's not the seed but the growing time.  IOW, take a seed and it first becomes a sprout, next - microgreen, next, next...       

———-

Well yes that’s true in a sense, but you’re paying usually when you’re getting a seed pack for seeds that were carefully grown for the purposes of growing a finished whatever it is that is of interest so for example a finished broccoli head if you were growing a broccoli plant and not for creating in particular a lot of micro greens of broccoli.

Or in the case of lettuce perhaps for making a nice big pretty lettuce.  One that doesn’t bolt quickly and perhaps one that has nice crunch in the case of certain types of lettuce or softness if it’s a butter lettuce. various qualities for the finished lettuce are being chosen for a pack of lettuce seeds and that’s OK if you want to use that but you don’t really need that for micro greens.

So what I have found this in my saved lettuces because I grow a bunch of different types of lettuce is furthermorewhen I try to save their seats seeds if I try to grow them individually to make a new lettuce I don’t end up with a particularly good final result most of the time.  I might end up with something that crosses two qualities in a way that doesn’t turn out especially good. if I were wanting to breed new lettuces that could be interesting because I could be choosing my own best resulting plants’ seeds that I find are good for my area and that I do like the taste of and other qualities of — but that’s not really what I’m trying to do and so I have found that those seeds don’t work super wellDon’t work super well for making new full size lettuces.   but work just fine if they’re part of micro greens.


Answer below picked up your purple I don’t have any way to change that here.

Sometimes seeds have come about from a mixture of several plants that are near each other and the resulting plant will have the worst qualities of both parents not the best qualities of both parents from the point of somebody wanting to eat it later . That tends not to be as big of a problem for micro greens. in addition there may be qualities that are superior for full grown plants that are not excellent for micro greens were some seeds actually intended for micro greens may be better.
 

For example, a very hard strong thick stem may be excellent to support a heavy seed head of a sunflower, whereas a more tender fragile type of stem may be better from the point of eating the greens

 

If lettuce or other plants I have bolt I just keep the seeds. Usually in refrigerator. (eta: garden lettuces if growing several types near each other especially is likely to have been cross pollinated and not necessarily make good full size lettuces, but is likely okay for micro greens. 
Great, to harvest seeds for next planting. Can you do that imediately?
 

once plants have gone to seed you can usually harvest the seeds as soon as they are mature and most such seeds can be planted immediately after harvest. There are a few types of seeds that need to wait in special conditions such as cold for example for a certain length of time before they can sprout.For example I am currently in the process of quotes stratifying” seeds of particular types of trees to be ready to plant in about two months. But in my experience most regular greens  don’t need that

 

 

There are probably sites about it, but I just do it. I do it more or less Like picking a dandelion seed ball (if you  are familiar with that?) and instead of blowing on it, put it in a baggie.
So, in a leaf such as a sunflower microgreen, do you dissect the leaf to remove seeds?  I can see this being time-consuming as you mentioned
 

 
I’m not sure if this is a serious question to be honest!!!!
 

I’ll try to answer it is if it’s serious but I suspect you’re pulling my leg that you don’t understand 

Sunflower seeds — have you seen any In your life? Like a pack in a store? They initially come in shells, shells which when growing are located in the big flower head. There are no seeds to be harvested until there is a mature flower that has gone to seed.  
 

Your suggestion of dissecting microgreen  leaf to remove the seeds Would be somewhat like the idea of dissecting an infant child in order to remove the sperm or eggs  for the next generation — Possibly in either case you could clone cells from a baby or Clone cells cellsfrom an immature micro green leaf but there are no seeds  In a micro green leaf 

 

It takes quite a lot of seeds to make micro greens so that’s a reason to save ones own or buy a substantial amount.  A typical seed pack isn’t probably enough to make a substantial covering for a little 3x3” type pot. 

Pen,  thanks!  I spent this morning going to one of our local farmer's markets and talked with a woman degreed in horticultural sciences, etc.  She used to work as a master gardener as well.  She was very insightful and I have a better idea now how to proceed.  I bought broccoli, kale and sunflower to start with.  I don't want a mix as I might want to use on kale on sandwiches one day and broccoli and next, etc.

Thanks for your help!!

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