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Possibly of interest regarding a “conspiracy” type claim - possibly vaccine related. Or not


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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

FIrst of all, the latest is that hydroxychloroquine did work and a previous study has been withdrawn.  

Secondly, it is not Trump supporters who are the main non vaccinators.  One of the larger groups that is hesistant is the black community which is why some other methods of distribution are being tried.  Like vaccine drives at barber shops,  and festivals, etc.

I think this PBS interview is from April and the statistics mentioned even older, so hopefully they've changed since then.  It doesn't necessarily directly link Trump with conservative Christians (many of whom are Trump supporters) who are hesitating about the Covid vaccine, but it does point to the environment of conspiracy theories, the "no one can tell me what to do" mentality, the push to distrust media, etc. as the main drivers.

At the time, it said 45 percent of white evangelicals were not or would probably not be vaccinated.  (Would be interesting to know what those statistics are now!)

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/pastor-reveals-the-reasons-behind-covid-vaccine-hesitancy-in-the-evangelical-community

I love how cities are being creative about getting the vaccine to other communities that have hesitated though.  From what I've heard, many of those methods have been quite successful!

 

 

Edited by J-rap
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1 hour ago, Laura Corin said:

This large well-designed trial was not withdrawn:

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2022926

There are a number of double blind studies out of reputable institutions showing hydroxychloroquine doesn't work for covid.  Having a single study pulled by peer review isn't really unusual.  It's how science works.  I have yet to see a double blind study showing it is effective or recommended.  Most large organizations are recommending no further funding for study.  

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3 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

FIrst of all, the latest is that hydroxychloroquine did work and a previous study has been withdrawn.  

Secondly, it is not Trump supporters who are the main non vaccinators.  One of the larger groups that is hesistant is the black community which is why some other methods of distribution are being tried.  Like vaccine drives at barber shops,  and festivals, etc.

I do think there’s pretty good evidence now that hydroxychloroquine isn’t helpful, but my point wasn’t really whether it worked or not, but how quickly and tenaciously some of his supporters took it on, mostly because it was promoted by him. Maybe I should say his supporters that I know, because I don’t know all his supporters, but I do know a bunch lol. I did not think so many of his supporters would reject the vaccine as he was strongly supportive of it, at least initially.

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Just now, TCB said:

I do think there’s pretty good evidence now that hydroxychloroquine isn’t helpful, but my point wasn’t really whether it worked or not, but how quickly and tenaciously some of his supporters took it on, mostly because it was promoted by him. Maybe I should say his supporters that I know, because I don’t know all his supporters, but I do know a bunch lol. I did not think so many of his supporters would reject the vaccine as he was strongly supportive of it, at least initially.

He is still strongly supportive of it.  My city voted for Trump.  My city has a very good vaccination rate though less so in the young adult range and also in the black community.  OTOH,  another area of my state also voted for Trump and has a low vaccination rate.  

The one person I know who definitely seems to believe QAnon stuff is against the vaccine- but that goes along with that nutty conspiracy.   That nutty conspiracy is not very popular in my city--- way too many educated and analytical people.

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14 hours ago, Halftime Hope said:

Fallacy much?

In my partial-lifetime of experience, there have been phenomena that could not be explained, until suddenly they could. There was no woo or supernatural, just physical phenomena that were not apparent until they were.  I suspect that in time, we will know why Trilliumlady's 7 people, and a few people like them, have magnets sticking to their arms.  

Not every phenomena is a conspiracy theory. It's generally something that is explained at some point after the question is asked. 

 

We do know. Adhesion.

5 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

So here’s why that’s frustrating to me.

I have seen people pull quarters out of other people’s ears.  And I’ve seen people pull their own thumbs off and reattach them. I’ve seen people cut in half and jabbed with swords.

I have never looked for a reason that might make potentially logical sense for these things to be real if they are. I *have been impressed with people’s ability to make them seem as though they were, and my brain always tries to figure out how it got tricked.  Sometimes I can figure out or find the answers. Other times, I just accept that, even though I don’t know the details, the laws of nature still apply.

Exactly.

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1 hour ago, TravelingChris said:

He is still strongly supportive of it.  My city voted for Trump.  My city has a very good vaccination rate though less so in the young adult range and also in the black community.  OTOH,  another area of my state also voted for Trump and has a low vaccination rate.  

The one person I know who definitely seems to believe QAnon stuff is against the vaccine- but that goes along with that nutty conspiracy.   That nutty conspiracy is not very popular in my city--- way too many educated and analytical people.

Sounds like this might go along with what I’ve noticed. Are you in a city and the low vaccination area of your state is more rural? It seems to me that Republican* voters in cities don’t have the same prevalence of anti vax and conspiracy beliefs as Republican voters in rural areas (and I say that as someone who lives rural—I’m not saying it to put down rural dwellers). I’m in a rural area with a vax rate 30% points lower than the nearest (highly educated) suburb, less than 10 miles away. Extremely different demographics between the two areas. Interestingly, the highly vaxed suburb is way, way more racially diverse. My rural area is shockingly white compared to all the nearest suburbs and the nearest city. Demographics are strange things. 
 

*I debated what word to use here—Trump or Republican. They are obviously not the same thing. I have found in my area, city Republicans are less likely to be Trump voters than rural Republicans. FWIW. 

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11 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

So here’s why that’s frustrating to me.

I have seen people pull quarters out of other people’s ears.  And I’ve seen people pull their own thumbs off and reattach them. I’ve seen people cut in half and jabbed with swords.

I have never looked for a reason that might make potentially logical sense for these things to be real if they are. I *have been impressed with people’s ability to make them seem as though they were, and my brain always tries to figure out how it got tricked.  Sometimes I can figure out or find the answers. Other times, I just accept that, even though I don’t know the details, the laws of nature still apply.


Sure.  I think I can understand that feeling.
 

I have not dismissed the possibility of the magnets sticking (via the magnet aspect, not sweat, glue or so forth) as potentially not a magic trick.  And so I too expect the “laws of nature “ to apply, hence was looking for a potential cause. And it turned out to be a super interesting rabbit hole of its own. Not in some bad microchip conspiracy type way, but as exploration of other potential therapeutic approaches. 

 

I have my own frustrations about some things that most on WTM accept as real, probably real, or potentially real also.  Or the opposite, frustrations with things that most on WTM have dismissed as unreal. I am not talking about magnets sticking or not.

 

There seem to be many areas where people can easily take a live and let live  approach on WTM. However, I suspect anything that  relates to CV19 tends to be more fraught because people are fearful that the wrong decision can lead to death. Or debility. 
 

 

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What’s also frustrating is this idea that there are always two equally legitimate “sides,” and both should be presented, and then viewers/readers will “decide.” Like so:

Is the earth flat? Should women be allowed to wear pants? Can cats do multiplication?

We will now hear from Mrs. Smugglins, who says yes, and Mr. Fancypants, who says no. Viewers, let us know what you think!

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Along the topic of belief in conspiracy claims and misinformation, I read this study today that I thought was really interesting. The short summary is that people are very poor judges of their own ability to spot “fake news” or misinformation, and that those people who most overestimate their ability to determine what things are true are the most likely to accept fake news and the most likely to disseminate it to others. This is a thing I think is going to be really important for our kids all to be well educated in (though if those doing the educating are so poor at it, that begs the question of how the problem will be fixed). It would be cool if there was some online test of some kind people could do to see how they do in their ability to identify false information and evaluate sources.

The study:
Overconfidence in news judgments is associated with false news susceptibility

 

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, KSera said:

Along the topic of belief in conspiracy claims and misinformation, I read this study today that I thought was really interesting. The short summary is that people are very poor judges of their own ability to spot “fake news” or misinformation, and that those people who most overestimate their ability to determine what things are true are the most likely to accept fake news and the most likely to disseminate it to others. This is a thing I think is going to be really important for our kids all to be well educated in (though if those doing the educating are so poor at it, that begs the question of how the problem will be fixed). It would be cool if there was some online test of some kind people could do to see how they do in their ability to identify false information and evaluate sources.

The study:
Overconfidence in news judgments is associated with false news susceptibility

 

It's the Dunning Kruger Effect --

Quote

The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which people wrongly overestimate their knowledge or ability in a specific area. This tends to occur because a lack of self-awareness prevents them from accurately assessing their own skills.

 

Edited by Pawz4me
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11 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

FIrst of all, the latest is that hydroxychloroquine did work and a previous study has been withdrawn.  

Secondly, it is not Trump supporters who are the main non vaccinators.  One of the larger groups that is hesistant is the black community which is why some other methods of distribution are being tried.  Like vaccine drives at barber shops,  and festivals, etc.

Interesting....I heard black people are not the most vaccine hesitant.....the largest group of vaccine hesitant are middle income male republicans.  

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1 minute ago, Scarlett said:

Interesting....I heard black people are not the most vaccine hesitant.....the largest group of vaccine hesitant are middle income male republicans.  

You have to look closely at how the sentence is phrased.  Middle income male Republicans are the most vaccine hesitant group.  But they are a comparatively small percentage of the population, so most vaccine hesitant people aren't middle-income male republicans.  It's a higher percentage of a smaller group.

 

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6 hours ago, KSera said:

Sounds like this might go along with what I’ve noticed. Are you in a city and the low vaccination area of your state is more rural? It seems to me that Republican* voters in cities don’t have the same prevalence of anti vax and conspiracy beliefs as Republican voters in rural areas (and I say that as someone who lives rural—I’m not saying it to put down rural dwellers). I’m in a rural area with a vax rate 30% points lower than the nearest (highly educated) suburb, less than 10 miles away. Extremely different demographics between the two areas. Interestingly, the highly vaxed suburb is way, way more racially diverse. My rural area is shockingly white compared to all the nearest suburbs and the nearest city. Demographics are strange things. 
 

*I debated what word to use here—Trump or Republican. They are obviously not the same thing. I have found in my area, city Republicans are less likely to be Trump voters than rural Republicans. FWIW. 

Well I am not sure what you call Trump voters too.  Did I vote for Trump in the primary in 2016? No, I voted for Marco Rubio.  Did we go to rallies?  No.  Did we wear MAGA hats, etc? No.  But did we vote for Trump- yes.    And yes, I am in a city

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1 hour ago, Danae said:

You have to look closely at how the sentence is phrased.  Middle income male Republicans are the most vaccine hesitant group.  But they are a comparatively small percentage of the population, so most vaccine hesitant people aren't middle-income male republicans.  It's a higher percentage of a smaller group.

 

Hmm....small percentage? I thought they ruled the world. 

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Posted (edited)

So, here is an interesting fact.  My son got his first dose of the vaccine, 16 days ago.  The bandaid fell off today.  That is one seriously powerful bandaid.  It reminded me that mine stayed on until I removed it myself at like 10 days.  So, maybe the magnets are sticking to bandaid residue from some kinda special covid bandaid they are using?  

Also, his covid-shot bandaid tan line is kinda cool.   It might be a good way to pick up girls, as they will know he is an intelligent person who cares about the health of others.  Or at least, they'll know that his mother is those things, since I didn't actually give him a choice.  

 

ETA. Even if he didn't have a choice, my kid is still intelligent and caring and provaccine.  Didn't want to imply otherwise. 

Edited by BaseballandHockey
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8 hours ago, BaseballandHockey said:

So, here is an interesting fact.  My son got his first dose of the vaccine, 16 days ago.  The bandaid fell off today.  That is one seriously powerful bandaid.  It reminded me that mine stayed on until I removed it myself at like 10 days.  So, maybe the magnets are sticking to bandaid residue from some kinda special covid bandaid they are using?  

Also, his covid-shot bandaid tan line is kinda cool.   It might be a good way to pick up girls, as they will know he is an intelligent person who cares about the health of others.  Or at least, they'll know that his mother is those things, since I didn't actually give him a choice.  

 

ETA. Even if he didn't have a choice, my kid is still intelligent and caring and provaccine.  Didn't want to imply otherwise. 

Is this a joke?

if not, why did you keep the bandaids on for so long? 

That can’t be hygienic or good for your skin.

 

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11 hours ago, BaseballandHockey said:

So, here is an interesting fact.  My son got his first dose of the vaccine, 16 days ago.  The bandaid fell off today.  That is one seriously powerful bandaid.  It reminded me that mine stayed on until I removed it myself at like 10 days.  So, maybe the magnets are sticking to bandaid residue from some kinda special covid bandaid they are using?  
 

could be   


 

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11 hours ago, BaseballandHockey said:

So, here is an interesting fact.  My son got his first dose of the vaccine, 16 days ago.  The bandaid fell off today.  That is one seriously powerful bandaid.  It reminded me that mine stayed on until I removed it myself at like 10 days.  So, maybe the magnets are sticking to bandaid residue from some kinda special covid bandaid they are using?  

Also, his covid-shot bandaid tan line is kinda cool.   It might be a good way to pick up girls, as they will know he is an intelligent person who cares about the health of others.  Or at least, they'll know that his mother is those things, since I didn't actually give him a choice.  

 

ETA. Even if he didn't have a choice, my kid is still intelligent and caring and provaccine.  Didn't want to imply otherwise. 

I had one of the super bandaids too!  I usually wait until bandaids start to loosen before pulling them off but that one never did.  No stickiness around the edges or anything even after two weeks of showers.  I finally scraped it off, although I was tempted to just leave it and see how long it stayed pristine.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Danae said:

I had one of the super bandaids too!  I usually wait until bandaids start to loosen before pulling them off but that one never did.  No stickiness around the edges or anything even after two weeks of showers.  I finally scraped it off, although I was tempted to just leave it and see how long it stayed pristine.

No Bandaids/plasters here.  Hold a piece of cotton wool in place for a bit.  Bin and go.

ETA: so  we could use Scottish vaccine people as a control!

Edited by Laura Corin
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11 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

No Bandaids/plasters here.  Hold a piece of cotton wool in place for a bit.  Bin and go.

 

That makes so much more sense. I'm sure they exist, but I can't imagine it's more than a teeny tiny fraction of people who actually need a Bandaid after an injection. For both vaccines I pulled mine off and threw them in the trash before I left the building. I can't fathom leaving one on for an hour, let alone for days and days and days.

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15 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

It's the Dunning Kruger Effect --

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/how-do-you-know/202012/dunning-kruger-isnt-real
 

😂

Quote

Dunning-Kruger Isn't Real

The least knowledgeable people are not the most overconfident.

The Dunning-Kruger effect is commonly invoked in online arguments to discredit other people’s ideas. The effect states that people who know the least about a topic are the most overconfident about that topic while people who know the most tend to be more humble and accurate in their self-assessment. It seems intuitively right, and it’s often a way to undercut people who present their opinions and arguments with "absolute certainty" that they’re right. The only problem is that the Dunning-Kruger effect itself is wrong.

Quote

So now if someone online says something cutting about how the person they're arguing with is too stupid to know they’re wrong, you can point them to this post. There is no Dunning-Kruger. Everyone thinks they’re better than average. How’s that for taking the wind out of a dunk?

 

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1 hour ago, Pawz4me said:

That makes so much more sense. I'm sure they exist, but I can't imagine it's more than a teeny tiny fraction of people who actually need a Bandaid after an injection. For both vaccines I pulled mine off and threw them in the trash before I left the building. I can't fathom leaving one on for an hour, let alone for days and days and days.

I did NOT save my Band-Aid as a little souvenir of my vaccination day.

I DID NOT.

Because that would have been totally weird. ***

 

 

*** Ok, yes, I saved it. But if they would have given me an “I got vaccinated” sticker, I would have saved that instead. Not that I am bitter toward the people who got stickers...  envious maybe.... 

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4 minutes ago, Catwoman said:

 

*** Ok, yes, I saved it. But if they would have given me an “I got vaccinated” sticker, I would have saved that instead. Not that I am bitter toward the people who got stickers...  envious maybe.... 

I'm just happy with my online record.

Screenshot_20210602-171640_Chrome.jpg

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37 minutes ago, Penelope said:

The article was a lot more nuanced than the author's summary of a (apparently raging) debate over the fact that the DK effect was unable to be proven based upon studies that incorporated mathematical modeling and whether it (DK) can be better explained by other factors.

After the blog author posted his summary that there is no DK, he then added this paragraph:

* Incidentally, Vincent argues that this shows that there is a Dunning-Kruger effect, because people are biased, but that’s it’s just a different effect from the one in the literature. Knowing more doesn’t make people less biased: Everyone’s equally biased. I’m saying this means we have a different effect, but the argument is just about whether we shift the meaning of Dunning-Kruger or use a different label.

So, IOW, researchers are still arguing over it.

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35 minutes ago, Happy2BaMom said:

So, IOW, researchers are still arguing over it.

Right. And all of that is aside from the actual effect and findings of the article above that people who demonstrate they are the worst at identifying what is true in the news and what are good sources are the same ones who share, post and forward those stories to others the most. 

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3 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

I'm just happy with my online record.

Screenshot_20210602-171640_Chrome.jpg

Wait, you're allowing THE GOVERNMENT to track your vaccine status?!?!? What kind of psychopath are you?!?!? They have you now!!! It's all over!!! Might as well yeet yourself off a bridge -- you have been pwned by the Illuminati!!!! Q knows all!!!! 

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5 hours ago, Danae said:

I had one of the super bandaids too!  I usually wait until bandaids start to loosen before pulling them off but that one never did.  No stickiness around the edges or anything even after two weeks of showers.  I finally scraped it off, although I was tempted to just leave it and see how long it stayed pristine.

Maybe they are magnetic bandaids?

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6 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

Wait, you're allowing THE GOVERNMENT to track your vaccine status?!?!? What kind of psychopath are you?!?!? They have you now!!! It's all over!!! Might as well yeet yourself off a bridge -- you have been pwned by the Illuminati!!!! Q knows all!!!! 

And this in a country with no ID cards. It was only 13 years ago that driving licences with photos were introduced. People who don’t drive and don’t travel overseas often have no photo ID at all. And yet,  in order to fight a pandemic, making a register of vaccinations seems like a good idea 

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On 6/1/2021 at 11:57 AM, ktgrok said:

We do know. Adhesion.

Exactly.

I would expect TrilliumLady to be able to tell the difference between adhesion and magnetism and to be able to report her observations correctly.  

Look, I have no idea if it's a real thing or not, or if it just happens in a few people, like many other odd physical phenomena. But I do expect that when we as boardies are having an honest conversation about something here, we would be able to discuss it with integrity and without casting aspersions on others' competence on the most basic things.  

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1 minute ago, Halftime Hope said:

I would expect TrilliumLady to be able to tell the difference between adhesion and magnetism and to be able to report her observations correctly.  

Look, I have no idea if it's a real thing or not, or if it just happens in a few people, like many other odd physical phenomena. But I do expect that when we as boardies are having an honest conversation about something here, we would be able to discuss it with integrity and without casting aspersions on others' competence on the most basic things.  

So, if a boardie says something that goes against science and the laws of physics, I should trust her? If a boardie says she saw a sheep levitating I should believe in flying sheep rather than think that there was a realistic sheep balloon? 

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Just now, ktgrok said:

So, if a boardie says something that goes against science and the laws of physics, I should trust her? If a boardie says she saw a sheep levitating I should believe in flying sheep rather than think that there was a realistic sheep balloon? 

So basically you’re saying I should keep my levitating sheep stories to myself?

Note taken. 😉 

But I saw this goat once, and...

Ummm... 

Never mind. 

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1 minute ago, Catwoman said:

So basically you’re saying I should keep my levitating sheep stories to myself?

Note taken. 😉 

But I saw this goat once, and...

Ummm... 

Never mind. 

Goats are weird - I'd believe they are aliens. Forget "birds aren't real" I'm going with goats are not earthlings. 

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1 minute ago, ktgrok said:

Goats are weird - I'd believe they are aliens. Forget "birds aren't real" I'm going with goats are not earthlings. 

But are they magnetic? 

That’s what we really need to know.

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4 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

So, if a boardie says something that goes against science and the laws of physics, I should trust her? If a boardie says she saw a sheep levitating I should believe in flying sheep rather than think that there was a realistic sheep balloon? 

First of all, I don't know how you  can legitimately say that it's "against" science and the laws of physics. Science includes observation and inquiry.  It's a new phenomenon that *may* be occurring in some people.  That is all.  

If Navy pilots say they have seen UFOs that defy all the laws of physics and move in ways never seen before, and they have footage of UFOs on radar, on IR, and on camera, should we tell them they are, in fact, only seeing sheep balloons, because there are in fact no such things as UFOs, but we have seen sheep balloons and can wrap our minds around them?  

Sometimes things are hoaxes, and if TrilliumLady wrote something false to perpetuate a hoax, that's on her, not on those of us who are hoping to have an honest discussion.  Everyone I know is too far out from having their shots, or I'd have asked them, just for the fun of scientific inquiry, to see if anyone had a bonafide magnetic spot.  

 

 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Halftime Hope said:

But I do expect that when we as boardies are having an honest conversation about something here, we would be able to discuss it with integrity and without casting aspersions on others' competence on the most basic things.  

I actually take everything I read here with a grain of salt. Sometimes a large one. I’ve been on various online forums for long enough to know what you see isn’t always what you get. Even with people who have been on a forum for a long time, and are well known, sometimes it becomes evident that they posted a lot of fiction. Some people just enjoy that for some reason 🤷‍♀️.  We’ve had a number of them here on TWTM. So, I might be considered overly suspicious of others, but I don’t just take everyone at their word here. Again, no offense to Trillium Lady, as I really don’t know anything about them. 

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13 minutes ago, Halftime Hope said:

Sometimes things are hoaxes, and if TrilliumLady wrote something false to perpetuate a hoax, that's on her, not on those of us who are hoping to have an honest discussion.  Everyone I know is too far out from having their shots, or I'd have asked them, just for the fun of scientific inquiry, to see if anyone had a bonafide magnetic spot.  

 

 

 

 

You could get the vaccine and then test your theory on your arm.

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7 hours ago, SeaConquest said:

Wait, you're allowing THE GOVERNMENT to track your vaccine status?!?!? What kind of psychopath are you?!?!? They have you now!!! It's all over!!! Might as well yeet yourself off a bridge -- you have been pwned by the Illuminati!!!! Q knows all!!!! 

We had the govt here in the US track our vaccines since we have been in out 20's.  Hahaha.  (We have Tricare)

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31 minutes ago, KSera said:

I actually take everything I read here with a grain of salt. Sometimes a large one. I’ve been on various online forums for long enough to know what you see isn’t always what you get. Even with people who have been on a forum for a long time, and are well known, sometimes it becomes evident that they posted a lot of fiction. Some people just enjoy that for some reason 🤷‍♀️.  We’ve had a number of them here on TWTM. So, I might be considered overly suspicious of others, but I don’t just take everyone at their word here. Again, no offense to Trillium Lady, as I really don’t know anything about them. 

I totally agree.  Honestly I can’t imagine a scenario with vaccinated people I know where a non vaccinated person comes into a public setting saying they want to try a magnet on your arm and everyone just agrees.  She got 7/7 to “stick”.  And you evidently need medical training to do it right?  Sounds legit.    🤔

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6 hours ago, ktgrok said:

People who have voted for Trump in an election are Trump voters. 

Of course.  But what I mean is that often people conflate all Trump voters as being the same in many myriad ways that aren't true.  

My dh is more conservative than me but he is a good scientist and looks at evidence and so of course, he got the vaccine as soon as he did.  I am also super analytical and well educated- much more so than dh on health issues and of course, I got the vaccine.

 Someone else who may have voted for Trump may also be one of those people who believe all sorts of conspiracies---chem stream, anti-vacc, Satanist pedophile world cabal, etc. That person didn't wear masks, didn;t social distance, didn't get a vaccination and believes that Bill Gates is putting microchips in people.   Other than we voted for the same candidate- what in the world do we have in common?

 

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So, I guess if you have a hard time with possible magnets or levitating sheep that holographic aircraft would be outside your realm of potential belief also . ...  Just musing...   😉

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59 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Goats are weird - I'd believe they are aliens. Forget "birds aren't real" I'm going with goats are not earthlings. 

My dh doesn't like goats but I do.  He has an aversion to them since we were at Oxen Hill Farm Park in MD and a goat decided to start eating his camera strap.  I thought it was funny.  Anyway, I actually like goats.  But he always quotes the Bible- "Sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell" just to rile me up.   

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26 minutes ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I totally agree.  Honestly I can’t imagine a scenario with vaccinated people I know where a non vaccinated person comes into a public setting saying they want to try a magnet on your arm and everyone just agrees.  She got 7/7 to “stick”.  And you evidently need medical training to do it right?  Sounds legit.    🤔

ITA.  And "in the medical field" is a pretty meaningless statement. That could mean just about anything.

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16 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

And this in a country with no ID cards. It was only 13 years ago that driving licences with photos were introduced. People who don’t drive and don’t travel overseas often have no photo ID at all. And yet,  in order to fight a pandemic, making a register of vaccinations seems like a good idea 

The US doesn’t have national ID cards. Because, you know, they’re a mark of the beast. You think I’m kidding? Run a search on it. I refuse to link to the websites that reinforce that. But, yeah, that’s one big reason why we don’t have a free form of national ID for all.

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9 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

Of course.  But what I mean is that often people conflate all Trump voters as being the same in many myriad ways that aren't true.  

My dh is more conservative than me but he is a good scientist and looks at evidence and so of course, he got the vaccine as soon as he did.  I am also super analytical and well educated- much more so than dh on health issues and of course, I got the vaccine.

 Someone else who may have voted for Trump may also be one of those people who believe all sorts of conspiracies---chem stream, anti-vacc, Satanist pedophile world cabal, etc. That person didn't wear masks, didn;t social distance, didn't get a vaccination and believes that Bill Gates is putting microchips in people.   Other than we voted for the same candidate- what in the world do we have in common?

 

And no one is saying they have everything in common, or that all Trump voters don't vaccinate. It is just that if you look at people against the vaccine and try to find commonalities, one predictor is being a trump voter. 

9 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

My dh doesn't like goats but I do.  He has an aversion to them since we were at Oxen Hill Farm Park in MD and a goat decided to start eating his camera strap.  I thought it was funny.  Anyway, I actually like goats.  But he always quotes the Bible- "Sheep go to heaven, goats go to hell" just to rile me up.   

Ok, is that in the Bible? I'm on my first sip of coffee, but that seems legit. 

Actually....I'm being defensive because goats don't like me. They just don't. I can't say for sure how sheep feel about me, I haven't been around as many sheep, but goats don't like me. (my boss, a vet, after witnessing me around some, told me I'm better with predator species than prey species)

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15 minutes ago, stripe said:

The US doesn’t have national ID cards. Because, you know, they’re a mark of the beast. You think I’m kidding? Run a search on it. I refuse to link to the websites that reinforce that. But, yeah, that’s one big reason why we don’t have a free form of national ID for all.

We don't have the system of non-driver cards from the DMV either. People use things like birth certificates and utility bills for name and address. No photos.

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