Jump to content

Menu

Possibly of interest regarding a “conspiracy” type claim - possibly vaccine related. Or not


Pen
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Penelope said:

Interestingly, I have seen articles that suggest vaccine hesitancy is occurring in many places around the world. I just read something last week about a lot of resistance in India, even among healthcare workers and even in the midst of what they are going through.

I don’t know if there are videos about magnets or 5G being circulated in other languages or not, but I imagine the primary reason for hesitancy everywhere else is the same as it is here: not conspiracies, but questioning of the unknowns and perhaps some misunderstandings. 

 

 

1 hour ago, mathnerd said:

I work with teams of software developers in India and Singapore. There are a lot of them waiting for the travel bans to lift so that they can purchase expensive tickets to the US for their entire families, pay for 3-4 weeks of local stay in the US and get vaccine shots and then fly back. Places like CA have no questions asked for vaccines and they are waiting to take advantage of that! To them it is mind boggling that top notch vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna have people refusing to take it because of suspicion whereas they have severe shortages and different technology that is not so effective. They would pay a huge sum of money for access to the vaccines that are being rejected by many Americans. They think that the US should donate the surplus to them! So, vaccine tourism is something we will see soon!


both are true afaik

 

there is already vaccine tourism 

 

and there is also cv shot skepticism elsewhere in world, not just USA— particularly as I have seen evidence of it in Europe, UK etc . 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Pen said:

 


both are true afaik

 

there is already vaccine tourism 

 

and there is also cv shot skepticism elsewhere in world, not just USA— particularly as I have seen evidence of it in Europe, UK etc . 

 

 

Anecdotally I heard from friends that wealthy mexicans are flying in large numbers to the US to take the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines and that this has become very common in California, though I don't know of any cases personally.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After my coin experiment I have figured it all out:

The coin shortage last year was because Bill Gates was hoarding all the coins while he inserted transponders into them which now communicate with the microchips from the vaccine. 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, mathnerd said:

Anecdotally I heard from friends that wealthy mexicans are flying in large numbers to the US to take the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines and that this has become very common in California, though I don't know of any cases personally.

Yes. That’s my understanding too from So Cal friends, or driving across border to get it done 

 

also wealthy Taiwanese I heard

Edited by Pen
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, wathe said:

 I think its also true that the USA is a bit of a special case, where these sorts of beliefs are way more mainstream than in other places.

There have even been books written about the crazy things people believe, how it's more common in the U.S., and how it's not really new to have crazy beliefs. 

Here are just two books I remembered wanting to read. I'm sure there are more.

Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked Into an Intellectual Black Hole

Idiot America: How Stupidity Became A Virtue In The Land of The Free

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

There have even been books written about the crazy things people believe, how it's more common in the U.S., and how it's not really new to have crazy beliefs. 

Here are just two books I remembered wanting to read. I'm sure there are more.

Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked Into an Intellectual Black Hole

Idiot America: How Stupidity Became A Virtue In The Land of The Free

Just looked at Idiot America and saw it was published in 2009 - imagine an update! I'd also like someone to do an Australian version. We have our own mind-boggling moments of sheer idiocy, too!

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Pen said:

and there is also cv shot skepticism elsewhere in world, not just USA— particularly as I have seen evidence of it in Europe, UK etc .

There is certainly vaccine hesitancy in the UK, but it doesn't seem to be as widespread as in the US.  The following is the current vaccine situation in Scotland, reflecting strict cohort release (mostly by age but also by health status and employment in health/care).  Those aged 30 and over are currently being invited, except in one area that has more cases, where all adults are being invited.  The second shot figures reflect the 8-12 week spacing that is being used.

ETA: here is the key image.png.a83d60053a6f13ea04cd12fa69b90a1a.png

image.thumb.png.421a5021bdc8eedba97b64140ae4e7c4.png

Edited by Laura Corin
  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, mathnerd said:

I work with teams of software developers in India and Singapore. There are a lot of them waiting for the travel bans to lift so that they can purchase expensive tickets to the US for their entire families, pay for 3-4 weeks of local stay in the US and get vaccine shots and then fly back. Places like CA have no questions asked for vaccines and they are waiting to take advantage of that! To them it is mind boggling that top notch vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna have people refusing to take it because of suspicion whereas they have severe shortages and different technology that is not so effective. They would pay a huge sum of money for access to the vaccines that are being rejected by many Americans. They think that the US should donate the surplus to them! So, vaccine tourism is something we will see soon!

People from South America are doing  this and today I saw one about Asians doing this too.

And for me, it is mindblowing too.  Especially since it seems that all too many people end up with a life like mine after COVID.    I was so happy to get the vaccine.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, pinball said:

And politicians...certain politicians made it possible for the vaccine to be produced so quickly

commence thread explosion in 3, 2, 1...

Yes. Sure. I am grateful to EVERYONE who had a part in making this vaccine happen.

I don't have to like everything about certain politicians, but I don't care who gets credit for this, just that it happened is enough for me. 

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

There is certainly vaccine hesitancy in the UK, but it doesn't seem to be as widespread as in the US.  The following is the current vaccine situation in Scotland, reflecting strict cohort release (mostly by age but also by health status and employment in health/care).  Those aged 30 and over are currently being invited, except in one area that has more cases, where all adults are being invited.  The second shot figures reflect the 8-12 week spacing that is being used.

image.thumb.png.421a5021bdc8eedba97b64140ae4e7c4.png

Scotland seems like a pretty awesome place to live 😄 

  • Like 4
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Kanin said:

Scotland seems like a pretty awesome place to live 😄 

I think so, although it certainly has its faults.  It's all a matter of choosing which faults you can live with, I suppose.  For example, it doesn't bother me that there are maybe two days a year when I might consider wearing shorts and sandals.  Sometimes not even that many.  We thought about maybe moving to England on retirement (I'm English) but actually we both breathe a sigh of relief when we come back here.

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

For example, it doesn't bother me that there are maybe two days a year when I might consider wearing shorts and sandals.

Oh... that's my dream! I hate wearing shorts and sandals. 

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

There is certainly vaccine hesitancy in the UK, but it doesn't seem to be as widespread as in the US.  The following is the current vaccine situation in Scotland, reflecting strict cohort release (mostly by age but also by health status and employment in health/care).  Those aged 30 and over are currently being invited, except in one area that has more cases, where all adults are being invited.  The second shot figures reflect the 8-12 week spacing that is being used.

image.thumb.png.421a5021bdc8eedba97b64140ae4e7c4.png


as a general reaction to the graph it looks like Scots have more confidence in NHS than US Americans have in CDC etc. 

 

I am having a hard time with specifics of graphs. The light grey bars seem to be the percent in each age group out of that age group actually vaccinated- is that so?  If not please explain the grey lines.  And what do the dark bars represent? 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

There have even been books written about the crazy things people believe, how it's more common in the U.S., and how it's not really new to have crazy beliefs. 

Here are just two books I remembered wanting to read. I'm sure there are more.

Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked Into an Intellectual Black Hole

Idiot America: How Stupidity Became A Virtue In The Land of The Free


Copied from a review of the latter which copied it from the book:

 

- Any theory is valid if it sells books, soaks up ratings, or otherwise moves units.
- Anything can be true if someone says it loudly enough.
- Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it

 

———

I think these are good points, and can apply in multiple directions. 
 

“Crazy” seems to be whatever lies outside of whatever enough people believe fervently. 


 

(ETA: or perhaps “crazy” is defined by whatever lies outside of whatever enough people fervently believe within a particular group.  So “crazy” means outside the normative ideas of a particular in-group perhaps.) 

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, Mrs Tiggywinkle said:

Correlation does not equal causation.  I did the stick a quarter to my forehead trick a lot as a kid.  Pretty sure I didn’t have a magnet in my forehead.

I’m doing a Pfizer clinic today so I looked at the ingredient sheet. It’s:  mRNA, lipids ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2[(polyethylene glycol)-2000] -N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and cholesterol), potassium chloride, monobasic potassium phosphate, sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate, and sucrose.

So, mRNA, sugars and lipids mostly.  

salts, not sugars  😉   (ETA:  I'm not trying to be a jerk by correcting this. It's not an essential correction. It's just that my chemistry kicked in.  :-) )

Edited by Halftime Hope
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/28/2021 at 10:36 PM, MissLemon said:

The thing I don't understand is why Bill Gates would go to the bother of microchipping the entire planet. Like, to what end? To "control us"? Why? Just to say he did it? Who would he say it to, if we are all under his control? 

Because he wants to give us $500 for forwarding an email about Windows. (Or if we say “Apple is bad!” even if we’re talking about a rotten 🍎 in the frig.)

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Pen said:

and there is also cv shot skepticism elsewhere in world, not just USA— particularly as I have seen evidence of it in Europe, UK etc . 

 

There’s vaccine skepticism everywhere, including in India and across Africa. People are nervous, and everyone has a cell phone to spread nonsense nowadays. However, it also seems like less developed countries are in line for shots with more side effects and/or lower efficacy, and some of those countries haven’t had too many fatal COVID cases, so I can understand having concerns.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

I am having a hard time with specifics of graphs. The light grey bars seem to be the percent in each age group out of that age group actually vaccinated- is that so?  If not please explain the grey lines.  And what do the dark bars represent? 
 

I'm sorry, I cut off the key.  This is it:

image.png.23fb5a9c91a7a91b80c46cf6c45328a4.png

So, for example, in the age 80+ group, 98.5% have had their first jab and 94.3% have had their second.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Pen said:


as a general reaction to the graph it looks like Scots have more confidence in NHS than US Americans have in CDC etc. 
 

Or maybe Scots care more about each other (they have the NHS after all), aren’t as prone to embrace disinformation and conspiracy theories, and had a better leader when the pandemic started.

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Frances said:

Or maybe Scots care more about each other (they have the NHS after all), aren’t as prone to embrace disinformation and conspiracy theories, and had a better leader when the pandemic started.

It's important not to idealise, however. The UK death rate from the virus has been horrendous.  We are all pretty astonished that vaccination is going so well.

  • Like 3
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Kanin said:

Scotland seems like a pretty awesome place to live 😄 

I've only visited, but LOVED it. So very very much. I hated coming home. 

Scotland SMELLS good. I nearly cried when we got back to Orlando and I smelled the air. Ugh. 

My only complaint the whole time was the radio station situation, lol. I'm spoiled by multiple stations of each musical genre. In many places we were we could only pick up ONE station - not per genre - one station total. And it just played a mix of all different musical genres. Was...different. But with sattelite radio and amazon music and such I'm sure it would be fine now. 

Oh, and I gained weight eating so much shortbread. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, stripe said:

There’s vaccine skepticism everywhere, including in India and across Africa. People are nervous, and everyone has a cell phone to spread nonsense nowadays. However, it also seems like less developed countries are in line for shots with more side effects and/or lower efficacy, and some of those countries haven’t had too many fatal COVID cases, so I can understand having concerns.


I think the main reasons for concern for most people I know have nothing to do with magnets, or worries about embedded microchips or anything like that.

I think the main skepticism  relates to a variety of issues that people are concerned about, including — but not at all limited to: 

1) Top issue common to most if not for all people I know who are skeptical: the experimental nature of the new shots of at least all the types available in US and Europe ... I don’t know as much about what’s available in Africa and India ... not wanting to be human lab rats (or lab ferrets, or lab monkeys, or even more strongly, not wanting children to be used as experimental lab rats).

2) past issues with vaccines -  personal and/or not personal; and or past issues with ingredients like PEG 

3) with mRNA specifically, animal deaths from past trials  - and no confidence that the current roll out has solved those issues 

4) concerns about ADE

5) concerns about potential effects on fertility, later autoimmunity, cancers, neurological problems, clots, etc 

6) concerns that prior vaccine rollouts would have been shut down due to deaths and adverse events numbers and that the negatives of the CV19 various new shots types (mRNA, DNA etc) overall will outweigh the positives for many .  (No reason why this came out blue... I’m on my cellphone and have no color control) 

7) not a general top concern of most people I know, but a significant personal concern so I will include it, is about “leaky” vaccines. I don’t think most people I know have even heard of “leaky” vaccines, far less have major concerns about that. It becomes a flip side of the “herd immunity” idea where whole population groups can be important, not just the individual. 

etc 

 

 

In re nervousness, I think it is in part that many people know that all choices and options may be metaphorically like Russian Roulette—but do not know for sure which option has in their case the most chambers loaded with bullets.  And what seems “obvious” to one person about which option metaphorically speaking has more chambers loaded with bullets may be the exact opposite of what seems “obvious” to another person. 

On the positive side for many people having cellphones these days, it allows a variety of information as well as disinformation to be available literally at our fingertips.

So we can make the best personal decisions we can with more information as well as disinformation than usual, or anyway more than many of us had in decades past. We also have freedom to look into what seems to be “information” and what seems to be “disinformation” and to look into whose opinions it makes sense to give what sort of weight to. For ourselves. 

In metaphor we can do our individual best to figure out the Russian Roulette loading for our or our children’s situations, and to choose accordingly. 
 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

I think so, although it certainly has its faults.  It's all a matter of choosing which faults you can live with, I suppose.  For example, it doesn't bother me that there are maybe two days a year when I might consider wearing shorts and sandals.  Sometimes not even that many.  We thought about maybe moving to England on retirement (I'm English) but actually we both breathe a sigh of relief when we come back here.


I have very much wanted to visit Scotland. Had two “almost” chances that I missed. Then got too sick to travel. 
 

Maybe someday though. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

I'm sorry, I cut off the key.  This is it:

image.png.23fb5a9c91a7a91b80c46cf6c45328a4.png

So, for example, in the age 80+ group, 98.5% have had their first jab and 94.3% have had their second.

 

 


Thank you. Makes more sense now!

 

I certainly will pray that the concerns about ADE etc are overblown. If they are not then what looks like excellent rates of getting one or both jabs now, could turn out to be very terrible over next few years.  🙏🙏🙏🌷🌷🌷🕊
 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Pen said:


Thank you. Makes more sense now!

 

I certainly will pray that the concerns about ADE etc are overblown. If they are not then what looks like excellent rates of getting one or both jabs now, could turn out to be very terrible over next few years.  🙏🙏🙏🌷🌷🌷🕊
 

Thanks. I'm not worried

https://www.medpagetoday.com/special-reports/exclusives/91648

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 5/30/2021 at 11:01 AM, pinball said:

And politicians...certain politicians made it possible for the vaccine to be produced so quickly

commence thread explosion in 3, 2, 1...

My only regret is that the very same politicians who made it possible for the vaccines to be produced so quickly did not follow through to ensure that those vaccines they worked for are not regarded with suspicion or derision by many in the US. The vaccine development for Covid by the US is considered one of the greatest (if not the greatest) scientific achievements of humankind by millions of people - just a FYI that people are able to appreciate the good wherever it may originate from ...

Edited by mathnerd
grammar!
  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, mathnerd said:

My only regret is that the very same politicians who made it possible for the vaccines to be produced so quickly did not follow through to ensure that those vaccines they worked for are not regarded with suspicion or derision by many in the US. The vaccine development for Covid by the US is considered one of the greatest (if not the greatest) scientific achievement of humankind by millions of people - just a FYI that people are able to appreciate the good wherever it may originate from ...

I linked this in another thread. It has multiple times where the then-President touted and encouraged the vaccine.

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/mar/04/rachel-maddow/what-trump-said-encourage-covid-19-vaccine-use/

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, pinball said:

I linked this in another thread. It has multiple times where the then-President touted and encouraged the vaccine.

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/mar/04/rachel-maddow/what-trump-said-encourage-covid-19-vaccine-use/

That's great and all, but he should have promoted the vaccines every. single. day. Not just mentioned it here and there. And not simultaneously showed callous disregard for spreading the virus by having huge rallies where people crammed together unmasked, and constantly made fun of masks... he promoted the vaccines when he thought it would benefit his image, not because he cared about how the vaccines would benefit other people

That's probably too political but I don't care. 

 

  • Like 23
  • Thanks 3
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you know that it’s a conspiracy theory, then why disseminate it?  Why aren’t you dissecting and questioning these conspiracy theories as much as you are questioning vaccines?  There should be proof of an actual conspiracy before alleging that one exists. 
 

While I have had my own questions about vaccine safety answered satisfactorily enough for me to get vaccinated, I can have respect for someone who wants to wait for more vaccine research. I have ZERO respect for the dissemination of conspiracy theories.   

  • Like 15
  • Thanks 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, pinball said:

I linked this in another thread. It has multiple times where the then-President touted and encouraged the vaccine.

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/mar/04/rachel-maddow/what-trump-said-encourage-covid-19-vaccine-use/

I said "follow through": that, to me means to take a task to its ultimate conclusion. The politicians who led this remarkable vaccine development effort and made the brilliant move to place their bets on a new technology to save mankind did not follow through in their effort to ensure that the vaccine got into the arms of people. There is much that they could have done and should have done in my opinion.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Pen said:


I think the main reasons for concern for most people I know have nothing to do with magnets, or worries about embedded microchips or anything like that.

I think the main skepticism  relates to a variety of issues that people are concerned about, including — but not at all limited to: 

1) Top issue common to most if not for all people I know who are skeptical: the experimental nature of the new shots of at least all the types available in US and Europe ... I don’t know as much about what’s available in Africa and India ... not wanting to be human lab rats (or lab ferrets, or lab monkeys, or even more strongly, not wanting children to be used as experimental lab rats).

2) past issues with vaccines -  personal and/or not personal; and or past issues with ingredients like PEG 

3) with mRNA specifically, animal deaths from past trials  - and no confidence that the current roll out has solved those issues 

4) concerns about ADE

5) concerns about potential effects on fertility, later autoimmunity, cancers, neurological problems, clots, etc 

6) concerns that prior vaccine rollouts would have been shut down due to deaths and adverse events numbers and that the negatives of the CV19 various new shots types (mRNA, DNA etc) overall will outweigh the positives for many .  (No reason why this came out blue... I’m on my cellphone and have no color control) 

7) not a general top concern of most people I know, but a significant personal concern so I will include it, is about “leaky” vaccines. I don’t think most people I know have even heard of “leaky” vaccines, far less have major concerns about that. It becomes a flip side of the “herd immunity” idea where whole population groups can be important, not just the individual. 

etc 

 

 

In re nervousness, I think it is in part that many people know that all choices and options may be metaphorically like Russian Roulette—but do not know for sure which option has in their case the most chambers loaded with bullets.  And what seems “obvious” to one person about which option metaphorically speaking has more chambers loaded with bullets may be the exact opposite of what seems “obvious” to another person. 

On the positive side for many people having cellphones these days, it allows a variety of information as well as disinformation to be available literally at our fingertips.

So we can make the best personal decisions we can with more information as well as disinformation than usual, or anyway more than many of us had in decades past. We also have freedom to look into what seems to be “information” and what seems to be “disinformation” and to look into whose opinions it makes sense to give what sort of weight to. For ourselves. 

In metaphor we can do our individual best to figure out the Russian Roulette loading for our or our children’s situations, and to choose accordingly. 
 

 

 

You forget about considering others who cannot get vaccinated or for whom it’s known that the vaccines have limited efficacy (eg organ transplant recipients). Your reasons are all based on assuming one is only concerned about themselves and their children and not others. Which makes sense given how a significant portion of the US population reacted to the pandemic. But for some of us, concern about ourselves and our children is only one aspect to consider, not the exclusive thing.

  • Like 12
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

If you know that it’s a conspiracy theory, then why disseminate it?  Why aren’t you dissecting and questioning these conspiracy theories as much as you are questioning vaccines?  There should be proof of an actual conspiracy before alleging that one exists. 
 

While I have had my own questions about vaccine safety answered satisfactorily enough for me to get vaccinated, I can have respect for someone who wants to wait for more vaccine research. I have ZERO respect for the dissemination of conspiracy theories.   

QFT. In order not to have an even darker view of humankind than I do right now, I have to believe the people spreading conspiracy theories and disinformation, whether it’s about covid, vaccines, stolen elections or anything else, truly do not understand how they are being manipulated by people profiting off them (financially and/or in terms of political power) and truly do not comprehend the profound damage they are doing to our country and its citizens. 

  • Like 19
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, mathnerd said:

I said "follow through": that, to me means to take a task to its ultimate conclusion. The politicians who led this remarkable vaccine development effort and made the brilliant move to place their bets on a new technology to save mankind did not follow through in their effort to ensure that the vaccine got into the arms of people. There is much that they could have done and should have done in my opinion.

Plus, when you’ve already spread so many lies and half truths about the virus and regularly undermined public health officials, now everyone is supposed to believe and trust you and them and go get vaccinated? Not to mention the relentless attempts to disparage science and scientists when the facts don’t line up with your opinions. You can’t turn facts on and off to suite your agenda.

Edited by Frances
  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

I think so, although it certainly has its faults. For example, it doesn't bother me that there are maybe two days a year when I might consider wearing shorts and sandals.  Sometimes not even that many.   

There are a number of places (other countries, other states in the U.S.) that I think would be awesome places to live but that right there stops me from even dreaming about them. Nope. No. No. Nope. I need sunshine and warm weather, preferably almost year round. And I need to live where I don't have to wear socks and closed shoes. 🙂 

Edited by Lady Florida.
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

If you know that it’s a conspiracy theory, then why disseminate it?  Why aren’t you dissecting and questioning these conspiracy theories as much as you are questioning vaccines?  There should be proof of an actual conspiracy before alleging that one exists. 
 

While I have had my own questions about vaccine safety answered satisfactorily enough for me to get vaccinated, I can have respect for someone who wants to wait for more vaccine research. I have ZERO respect for the dissemination of conspiracy theories.   


Is this addressed to me?


I was looking for a reason that might make potentially logical sense for magnets to stick if they do. I was trying to title thread in a way that would give a heads up so that people who do not want to read such things - but who perhaps are not wanting to put me on ignore - could give thread a miss entirely  .

Eta: for clarity: No, I do not personally know it to be a “conspiracy theory” - I expect much of WTM would take it as such,  however.  — Two different matters.
I am inclined to believe @Trilliumlady that she personally saw it happen. But that does not mean there is necessarily any “conspiracy theory” beyond trade secrets and proprietary ingredients as is usual in various industries. 

 

I don’t see this as dissemination of a conspiracy theory. Either magnets stick (by magnetic pull) or they do not.  If they do, imo there has to be a logical reason. 
 

I find it interesting. 
 

And I find some other things that you probably consider “conspiracy theories” interesting too. 
 

I would think it has significantly to do with past experiences where my life has been affected by conspiracies. (That is “conspiracy theories” that turn out to be real conspiracies. )  In fact, I owe my life to having taken heed and others before me having taken heed of some situations which were in the uncertainty state rather than waiting for proof positive.  I expect that that is not true of your own experience. But for me it is probably in my epigenetics at this point. 

 

Edited by Pen
Clarity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Pen said:


I was looking for a reason that might make potentially logical sense for magnets to stick if they do. I was trying to title thread in a way that would give a heads up so that people who do not want to read such things - but who perhaps are not wanting to put me on ignore - could give thread a miss entirely  .

I don’t see this as dissemination of a conspiracy theory. Either magnets stick (by magnetic pull) or they do not.  If they do, imo there has to be a logical reason. 
 



 

Magnets do not stick to vaccination sites. And the magnetized nano particles mentioned would not be strong enough to make a magnet stick anyway. 

No logical reason is needed because magnets do not stick to vaccine sites. 

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 4
  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ktgrok said:

Magnets do not stick to vaccination sites. And the magnetized nano particles mentioned would not be strong enough to make a magnet stick anyway. 

No logical reason is needed because magnets do not stick to vaccine sites. 

Fallacy much?

In my partial-lifetime of experience, there have been phenomena that could not be explained, until suddenly they could. There was no woo or supernatural, just physical phenomena that were not apparent until they were.  I suspect that in time, we will know why Trilliumlady's 7 people, and a few people like them, have magnets sticking to their arms.  

Not every phenomena is a conspiracy theory. It's generally something that is explained at some point after the question is asked. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, pinball said:

I linked this in another thread. It has multiple times where the then-President touted and encouraged the vaccine.

https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/mar/04/rachel-maddow/what-trump-said-encourage-covid-19-vaccine-use/

Interesting that so many of his followers are now so vaccine hesitant. Why do you think that is? It seems a bit strange since so many unquestioningly went with his hydroxychloroquine claims, but not the vaccine. 

  • Like 7
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Halftime Hope said:

Fallacy much?

In my partial-lifetime of experience, there have been phenomena that could not be explained, until suddenly they could. There was no woo or supernatural, just physical phenomena that were not apparent until they were.  I suspect that in time, we will know why Trilliumlady's 7 people, and a few people like them, have magnets sticking to their arms.  

Not every phenomena is a conspiracy theory. It's generally something that is explained at some point after the question is asked. 

 

Do you have any evidence that magnets stick to people's arms?  Not anonymous posters, or youtube videos that provide no proof, but actual verified evidence? 

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Pen said:

I was looking for a reason that might make potentially logical sense for magnets to stick if they do. I was trying to title thread in a way that would give a heads up so that people who do not want to read such things - but who perhaps are not wanting to put me on ignore - could give thread a miss entirely

So here’s why that’s frustrating to me.

I have seen people pull quarters out of other people’s ears.  And I’ve seen people pull their own thumbs off and reattach them. I’ve seen people cut in half and jabbed with swords.

I have never looked for a reason that might make potentially logical sense for these things to be real if they are. I *have been impressed with people’s ability to make them seem as though they were, and my brain always tries to figure out how it got tricked.  Sometimes I can figure out or find the answers. Other times, I just accept that, even though I don’t know the details, the laws of nature still apply.

  • Like 12
  • Thanks 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Halftime Hope said:

Fallacy much?

In my partial-lifetime of experience, there have been phenomena that could not be explained, until suddenly they could. There was no woo or supernatural, just physical phenomena that were not apparent until they were.  I suspect that in time, we will know why Trilliumlady's 7 people, and a few people like them, have magnets sticking to their arms.  

Not every phenomena is a conspiracy theory. It's generally something that is explained at some point after the question is asked. 

 

And there are innumerable instances of people claiming that "y" causes "x" (or "y" will lead to "z"), only for those claims to turn out at some point to be complete bunk.

Yet few people ever acknowledge that fallacy.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, TCB said:

Interesting that so many of his followers are now so vaccine hesitant. Why do you think that is? It seems a bit strange since so many unquestioningly went with his hydroxychloroquine claims, but not the vaccine. 

FIrst of all, the latest is that hydroxychloroquine did work and a previous study has been withdrawn.  

Secondly, it is not Trump supporters who are the main non vaccinators.  One of the larger groups that is hesistant is the black community which is why some other methods of distribution are being tried.  Like vaccine drives at barber shops,  and festivals, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...