Jump to content

Menu

Possibly of interest regarding a “conspiracy” type claim - possibly vaccine related. Or not


Pen
 Share

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Trilliumlady said:

Very interesting.  So, really, as with many things in life it boils down to - who really knows? 🙂

New update, I made it work (sort of) if I hold my arm just right, the circle whiteboard magnet will stay on my skin (there's no magnetic pull it's just hanging on to my skin because it's a little humid here I think) I also stuck a nickle on and it worked (actually much better than the magnet), and the magnet "stuck" just as well to my other arm. 

To be perfectly clear, there is no magnetic pull, I cannot get this to work with any of the magnets we have that are magnet only (no plastic around the edge). It is the plastic sticking to my skin. If falls off very easily when I move.

20210529_092513.jpg

20210529_092427.jpg

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 3
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Trilliumlady said:

It’s hit or miss who will be at class when I’m there next week, but I’m willing to ask and see if they wouldn’t mind!  I had Covid within the past two months and am not vaccinated by recommendation of my healthcare provider d/t knowledge of personal health history.

I’m sorry to hear that you had Covid, but I’m glad you seem to have made a full recovery! I hope your immunity lasts a long time, since you aren’t able to be vaccinated.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, amiesmom said:

New update, I made it work (sort of) if I hold my arm just right, the circle whiteboard magnet will stay on my skin (there's no magnetic pull it's just hanging on to my skin because it's a little humid here I think) I also stuck a nickle on and it worked (actually much better than the magnet), and the magnet "stuck" just as well to my other arm. 

To be perfectly clear, there is no magnetic pull, I cannot get this to work with any of the magnets we have that are magnet only (no plastic around the edge). It is the plastic sticking to my skin. If falls off very easily when I move.

20210529_092513.jpg

20210529_092427.jpg

So there I was, thinking it was so cool that your magnet looked exactly like a nickel. 😃

I really have to start reading posts before I look at the pictures! 

Thanks for posting this!

 

Edited by Catwoman
Forgot to thank Amiesmom for posting this!
  • Haha 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Catwoman said:

So there I was, thinking it was so cool that your magnet looked exactly like a nickel.

I really have to start reading posts before I look at the pictures!

I meant to put the pictures in the other order, but I goofed!

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Happy2BaMom said:

Depends on whether one includes the diluent (usually saline) in the measurement. Your listed doses are the actual vaccine, I included the diluent. Not that it matter much either way. 🙂

0.3mL is the actual injected volume for the Pfizer covid vaccine (the volume is 0.3mL after dilution).  I administer these. We use 1cc syringes that are filled to the 0.3 mark.  They are a tiny, tiny volume.

From the monograph:  "Multiple Dose Vial(after dilution each vial contains 6doses of 0.3 mL)"

I'm working a covid vaccine clinic later this afternoon, actually.  Maybe I'll bring a magnet 🙂

And, as you stated upthread, they are clear too.  I'm pretty sure microchips and magnetic materials aren't transparent!

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, FuzzyCatz said:

This article does not refer to RNA vaccines, so not sure what the point of this is?


It’s the first thing I have seen thus far with a potentially rational explanation (potentially rational as it seems to me, ymmv)  toward how magnets might be able to stick to someone after a vaccine.  
 

My working assumption is that if there are some people (it’s apparently a small percentage so may also have to do with the person — high body iron load?) who are having magnets stick on for awhile following injection , then there has to be something to explain it.  
 

I didn’t previously know nanomagnetics existed like this as potentially injectable at all.  
 

I do know that some magnets are much more powerful than others. Even just ones in my kitchen have highly variable amounts of magnetic attraction despite being same size.  Some will barely stick to fridge to hold a single piece of paper, while others can support a big skillet. 
 


 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids of course had to do this they used a variety of magnets from fridge to dad's large magnet that is strong enough it's kept in shielding.  One of the small magnets did stick to the two year olds are.  She has never had an injection in her arm period.  Pretty sure she is just randomly sticky.   The big girls were both able ,with some experimenting, to make a small magnet stay for a second if they held there arm just right but it slid right off if they moved at all.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, wathe said:

0.3mL is the actual injected volume for the Pfizer covid vaccine (the volume is 0.3mL after dilution).  I administer these. We use 1cc syringes that are filled to the 0.3 mark.  They are a tiny, tiny volume.

From the monograph:  "Multiple Dose Vial(after dilution each vial contains 6doses of 0.3 mL)"

I'm working a covid vaccine clinic later this afternoon, actually.  Maybe I'll bring a magnet 🙂

And, as you stated upthread, they are clear too.  I'm pretty sure microchips and magnetic materials aren't transparent!

 


So far I haven’t heard any report of the full vials themselves showing magnetic attraction as if, assuming anything is actually happening, it is something that takes place when in body (which is why I have wondered if people it allegedly happens to could have high body iron). 

But yes, Please! I would love a report from someone with access to at least one type of Covid vaccine vials!  
 

The type magnets that allegedly stick for some people (not most, I have now heard of it allegedly sticking on one family member getting same type shots, but not others) seem to be very small lightweight yet very powerful neodymium type. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, wathe said:

0.3mL is the actual injected volume for the Pfizer covid vaccine (the volume is 0.3mL after dilution).  I administer these. We use 1cc syringes that are filled to the 0.3 mark.  They are a tiny, tiny volume.

From the monograph:  "Multiple Dose Vial(after dilution each vial contains 6doses of 0.3 mL)"

I'm working a covid vaccine clinic later this afternoon, actually.  Maybe I'll bring a magnet 🙂

And, as you stated upthread, they are clear too.  I'm pretty sure microchips and magnetic materials aren't transparent!

 


there are apparently transparent magnets in existence 

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/291/5505/785.5.full

 

but I have not been able to get in to Science mag to read about it

 

also, I expect that “nano” size particles would be invisible to naked eye

 

(the tiny quantity of injectable material seems a better argument to me than that you can’t see anything) 

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, mathnerd said:

Since so many conspiracies are referencing Bill Gates, 5G, microchips and Covid Vaccine in the same sentence, for those who are interested in what is actually going on:

Engineers at Columbia University first developed a tiny microchip that can be used for monitoring vital signals and it is 0.1 cubic mm in size which makes it small enough to be injected. But, it has not yet been tested on humans, not approved for use, has limited capabilities and it is still under R&D and it certainly has nothing to do with injectable vaccines. Some guy on facebook put a magnified image of a hypodermic needle with a tiny microchip resting on it and wrote the text: "Did you get yours yet?" referencing the Columbia microchip.

Poor Bill Gates mentioned that we need to have "Digital Certificates" to check who has been vaccinated and who has not been vaccinated as part of the plans to reopen the economy. He meant something other than microchips when he said that. The conspiracy theorists jumped on the bandwagon and claimed that Gates engineered the Coronavirus pandemic so that he could microchip us all using the vaccine. There are a lot of politicians who have repeated this (I will not post politics here) and the Russian Communist Party has repeated this and so on.

Here is the much talked about chip:

 https://www.engineering.columbia.edu/press-releases/shepard-injectable-chips-monitor-body-processes

My Google Maps app knows every single trip that I make, it sends me a monthly summary on what places I visited, gives me an automatic prompt on where I might be headed based on the past several weeks of travel history (e.g. pick up kid at 3:45 pm from sports practice etc). Why waste money on microchipping me?


I don’t think I would use “poor” to describe Bill Gates, however, thank you for the interesting links! 
 

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Trilliumlady said:

I’m in the medical field and know where vaccines are administered.  My exercise class instructor was talking about this one day two weeks ago.  Since then we have tested 7 people there at class or in the building who were curious about this since they did get the vaccine.  Only a couple of them were able to do this to themselves (perhaps because they weren’t sure or didn’t remember the exact spot where they were vaccinated).  When I did it for them (knowing where would be the most likely spot for administration), it stuck.  7 out of 7 people so far.  Both Moderna and Pfizer, with second dose having been received 2-4 weeks prior to us testing this.  We used one of those inch round magnets that often come with marker boards, if you know what I mean.  We were all floored.  So, though I do not pretend to know they how or why behind this, I am 100% convinced that those magnets stuck, independently, and they stayed there until they were physically removed from said person’s arm.


Thank you.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Trilliumlady said:

That is a good question - doing it within 4 weeks of receiving any other vaccine.  We did not try testing anyone there who had not be vaccinated, so no idea if that would have been found or not!


I haven’t been CV vaccinated, and tried myself, including where I know smallpox was given long ago because of scar still there, and all around vicinity of where I think my most recent vaccine was (not very recent) and got no sticking. 
 

But within 4 weeks of something else would be interesting experiment. 

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Trilliumlady said:

Again, for purposes of scientific research 😉 These people all had received both doses.  No idea if that would be a difference or not.

I had one shot per arm - right hand side the first shot, left arm the second. Neither arm has any magnetic powers. DH had both shots in the left arm - no magnets stuck to him. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tried it for sh*ts and giggles. I had Pfizer. Fully vaxed since early January. DH had Moderna. Fully vaxed since April. Older DS had his first Pfizer vax two weeks ago. I have given tons of IM injections in the deltoid. None of us stuck. Boo. My 5G could stand to be faster. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

Tried it for sh*ts and giggles. I had Pfizer. Fully vaxed since early January. DH had Moderna. Fully vaxed since April. Older DS had his first Pfizer vax two weeks ago. I have given tons of IM injections in the deltoid. None of us stuck. Boo. My 5G could stand to be faster. 

Are you holding your phone against your arm? That’s how you make it faster. 😉 

  • Haha 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Trilliumlady said:

Again, for purposes of scientific research 😉 These people all had received both doses.  No idea if that would be a difference or not.

Hubby and I have both received both doses. No magnet stick here. 

And it’s not scientific research unless you are following every step of the Scientific Method. 😉

Edited by Happy2BaMom
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Trilliumlady said:

 I had Covid within the past two months and am not vaccinated by recommendation of my healthcare provider d/t knowledge of personal health history.

It’s interesting I haven’t seen anyone who had actually been vaccinated themself report that they believe this magic magnet theory. (Well, not actually that interesting, as it’s thoroughly unsurprising.)

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

Wait, what?

You don’t know how to moisten skin and stick things to it?


Apparently not-  afaik magnets don’t stick to me even if my skin is moist. 
 

I guess I’m just not a magnetic person

 

Eta: sand, a flower petal, German Shepherd fur  ... those types of things will stick to me if my skin is moist

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Show me a picture of someone with a slip of tissue paper between their skin and the magnet and then maybe I’ll waste another thought on this. 

I'm sure it would never work. I am tempted to send my SIL this photo just to make her go bananas, but I probably shouldn't. She already believes some pretty off the wall stuff, I shouldn't add to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, KSera said:

It’s interesting I haven’t seen anyone who had actually been vaccinated themself report that they believe this magic magnet theory. (Well, not actually that interesting, as it’s thoroughly unsurprising.)

I know it seems odd.  Were I on the other side in a similar conversation I’d be saying and thinking the same things.  I am not saying I believe anything untoward was in the vaccine at all.  All I’m saying is what we saw.  And these were women (and one man) who for the most part were very excited to get the vaccine (a couple were a bit more hesitant, but chose to do so anyway).  

I am intrigued by the piece of tissue paper under the magnet idea, though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Trilliumlady said:

I know it seems odd.  Were I on the other side in a similar conversation I’d be saying and thinking the same things.  I am not saying I believe anything untoward was in the vaccine at all.  All I’m saying is what we saw.  And these were women (and one man) who for the most part were very excited to get the vaccine (a couple were a bit more hesitant, but chose to do so anyway).  

I am intrigued by the piece of tissue paper under the magnet idea, though...

By what mechanism are you thinking this is plausible? And what made you think it was related to being vaccinated, considering you didn’t try it on any unvaccinated people? (Not that I’m asking you to. Quite honestly, I wouldn’t believe any random person who said they did this and it stuck to vaccinated people and not to unvaccinated. There are people saying all kinds of whackadoodle things these days, so frankly, “someone said it on the internet” doesn’t carry  any weight unless said person has a reason for me to see them as a reliable source. No offense to you personally, just sharing that’s my general approach to reading things random people say on the Internet.)

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/28/2021 at 4:52 PM, regentrude said:

There are people who have massive metal plates and screws in their bodies from orthopedic surgeries. Magnets don't stick to their bodies.

I have titanium in my spinal column.  You're right, nothing magnetic sticks to my neck. My kids would prank me with every freaking magnet in the house if they did stick-especially my middle daughter's husband. He's that kind of guy. If magnets did stick I would have my grocery list and other reminders on it right now so I wouldn't forget them. I need all the help I can get.
 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Trilliumlady said:

I know it seems odd.  Were I on the other side in a similar conversation I’d be saying and thinking the same things.  I am not saying I believe anything untoward was in the vaccine at all.  All I’m saying is what we saw.  And these were women (and one man) who for the most part were very excited to get the vaccine (a couple were a bit more hesitant, but chose to do so anyway).  

I am intrigued by the piece of tissue paper under the magnet idea, though...


If  you get another chance to test, I am interested in the tissue paper too.  And I’d love a video not just still photo if it were to happen again and someone were willing. 7 out of 7 is way more than  I was hearing people say  ...  though maybe catching right time, place, makes a difference.   Seems like it’s time for a Shakespeare quote about stranger things than our philosophies have dreamt of

 

 

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mrs Tiggywinkle said:

Um....this isn’t really how vaccines, magnetism, or nano-magnetic particles that are used in biomedicine work....like, this isn’t how any of that works....

I'm at the point I am saying the bolded phrase WAY too much. Maybe I need it on a t-shirt. Or a tattoo...on my forehead so I can just point to it. 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When people are saying that they can't imagine how it could have worked like that in the video.  Are they including things like double sided tape and glue?  I mean, my assumption is straight up fraud.  

Like, I don't understand the thinking that Bill Gates, and the entire pharmaceutical industry, and the CDC are lying to us, but there's no way some youtuber is telling anything less than the truth.  

  • Like 26
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Again, not that I give any credence to all the Bill Gates conspiracies but although I totally don’t get it either there are people that seem to thrive on controlling other people for whatever reason.   And we have Napoleon or Alexander or others etc.  I don’t get it because I don’t like responsibility and I figure power and responsibility go hand in hand.  But there does seem to be a personality type that does.  I don’t think it’s impossibile that a narcissistic type person could want to control people that way.  I just don’t see Bill Gates as being that kind of person.

I get that some people are wired that way.  It's more like, a pandemic and microchips-in-the-vaccine scheme seems like an awfully complicated and inefficient way of going about world domination.  

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Homeschool Mom in AZ said:

 If magnets did stick I would have my grocery list and other reminders on it right now so I wouldn't forget them. I need all the help I can get.
 

Now that would be a practical use of magnetic implants. If only Bill Gates thought of that instead of wanting to use chip technology to track random people throughout the world.

3 hours ago, Mrs Tiggywinkle said:

Um....this isn’t really how vaccines, magnetism, or nano-magnetic particles that are used in biomedicine work....like, this isn’t how any of that works....

Oh, but you're being rational. People who believe these batsh!t ideas don't want rational rebuttals.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Mrs Tiggywinkle said:

Um....this isn’t really how vaccines, magnetism, or nano-magnetic particles that are used in biomedicine work....like, this isn’t how any of that works....


so is it your assumption is that it is all made up including the person who posted on this thread that she has seen it happen? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 5/28/2021 at 5:07 PM, AngelaR said:

I would be interested in reading a summary by you, the OP, of what you think this article is about?  


using magnetic nanoparticles to facilitate dna vaccine transfection —  iirc for this particular article.
 

I got interested and have read about 10 different articles or article abstracts at this point. Some were about using magnetic nanoparticles to facilitate specific targeted therapy such as of a cancer by being able to use magnetic fields to direct the drug that includes the magnetic nanoparticles to where the cancer is located, or other similar uses

there seem to be several different forms of magnetic nanoparticles not all iron based    Some become magnetic in the presence of a magnet and are not magnetic when not in the presence of a magnet according to one article.

In addition to being made of a variety of materials they also come in different sizes and shapes. Some seem activated by light or heat. Some flip their polarities in certain circumstances...

 

It’s quite fascinating imo

 

(ETA: I strongly prefer whole articles to abstracts, but many on this subject that I was able to find were not allowing access to the full article. I started with transfection of vaccines because the current magnet thing led me there, but then got more interested in the targeted therapy use articles. )

 

And you? 

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 

13 hours ago, Pen said:


so is it your assumption is that it is all made up including the person who posted on this thread that she has seen it happen? 

No, she is saying is that you/we can not rule out that what the poster experienced was not due to some other variable, including user error. Until someone can (at the very least) *specifically* define what the physical substance is and how it is (or might be) measured as well as outlining & conducting an experiment(s) (control groups are necessary) where the results can then be reliably reproduced by other people using those same steps, one cannot claim causation.

The fact that someone on the internet claimed something to be true is not a baseline for truth, nor is referencing readings (especially from unnamed sources). You can certainly use those those things for your personal determination of truth, of course, but other people don't need to follow suit.

 

Edited by Happy2BaMom
  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

This whole thread (along with others of a similar vein) remind me of Brandolini's Law: "The amount of energy needed to refute bullsh*t is an order of magnitude larger than that to produce it."

********************************

ETA: However, I will add that all of it also points to the underlying crisis in science that is occurring right now. Much is due to scientific illiteracy, of course, but it's also true that "science" has lost a lot of credibility over the years due to corporate misuse of scientific results. My friends who have worked in science over the past few decades have told me of the pressure(s) they face to make their results line up with a desired end result. So, I am not unsympathetic to those who cast a caustic glance toward scientific claims. It's at that point, however, that a whole lot starts to go wrong, because the next step for too many people is to then just toss out the entire scientific method, or even any verifiable form of evidence.

It's possible to maintain skepticism while also understanding that we can't throw out the most basic steps of verifying claims. At least not unless we want to enter a new intellectual Dark Age (which, IMHO, we are already well on our way).

Edited by Happy2BaMom
  • Like 14
  • Thanks 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was already discussed in the vaccine thread.   This doesn't "challenge" my worldview in any way.

One of the things I mentioned in that thread was that vaccines have always been "challenged," even over 100 years ago, and yet, most of us are thankful many of the diseases have been eradicated in the USA.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/history-shows-americans-have-always-been-wary-vaccines-180976828/

Get the vaccine, don't get the vaccine, but when you add something this outlandish, don't expect people not to react.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Catwoman said:

I’m sorry to hear that you had Covid, but I’m glad you seem to have made a full recovery! I hope your immunity lasts a long time, since you aren’t able to be vaccinated.

I know that in the paperwork here I got before the vaccine it said you have to be at least 3 months from last positive COVID test to get the vaccine.  This was for Pfizer.  So she can get it next month, I guess.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Happy2BaMom said:

This whole thread (along with others of a similar vein) remind me of Brandolini's Law: "The amount of energy needed to refute bullsh*t is an order of magnitude larger than that to produce it."

So true. I fear people sharing the results of trying the magnet trick themself only lends credence to this being an actual phenomenon that needs investigation (even though all who have tried have found no truth to it). No amount of evidence is going to convince someone who thinks this is true. As you’ve seen, they just come up with an alternative explanation in order to maintain their belief.  

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even if all the people who made videos and pictures came out and said it was a hoax their would still be people who believe.  They would say the government/bill gates got to them or something.  

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, rebcoola said:

Even if all the people who made videos and pictures came out and said it was a hoax their would still be people who believe.  They would say the government/bill gates got to them or something.  

That’s actually been shown in research. Even after telling someone something was a lie, there’s a tendency for people to continue to believe it’s true. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

People in India and Brazil and Africa and all over the world are desperate to get the vaccine, and here in the USA there are all sorts of suspicions about how it's being used to "control" people, making them magnetic, secretly inserting microchips, etc. So many people have suffered and died. Why are more people not jumping for joy that brilliant scientists have finally gotten us out of this mess? 

Wondering if these sorts of things are happening in other countries, or if it's a phenomenon unique to the US. 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Kanin said:

People in India and Brazil and Africa and all over the world are desperate to get the vaccine, and here in the USA there are all sorts of suspicions about how it's being used to "control" people, making them magnetic, secretly inserting microchips, etc. So many people have suffered and died. Why are more people not jumping for joy that brilliant scientists have finally gotten us out of this mess? 

Wondering if these sorts of things are happening in other countries, or if it's a phenomenon unique to the US. 

I think it's both.  A certain amount of skepticism, mistrust of government, and susceptibility to conspiracy theories is universal.  I think its also true that the USA is a bit of a special case, where these sorts of beliefs are way more mainstream than in other places.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Pen said:


so is it your assumption is that it is all made up including the person who posted on this thread that she has seen it happen? 

Correlation does not equal causation.  I did the stick a quarter to my forehead trick a lot as a kid.  Pretty sure I didn’t have a magnet in my forehead.

I’m doing a Pfizer clinic today so I looked at the ingredient sheet. It’s:  mRNA, lipids ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2[(polyethylene glycol)-2000] -N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and cholesterol), potassium chloride, monobasic potassium phosphate, sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate, and sucrose.

So, mRNA, sugars and lipids mostly.  

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Pen said:


using magnetic nanoparticles to facilitate dna vaccine transfection —  iirc for this particular article.
 

How do you think this applies to the covid vaccines, which the manufactures, FDA and CDA all say aren't DNA vaccines?

I can look at a YouTuber and think of a motivation for them to make a fake video.  Maybe they have monetized their channel, and they want views.  Maybe they want to be famous.  Maybe they believe the vaccine is dangerous and are making things up to convince people to avoid them.  I can imagine that a small number of people might choose to make false videos because of these motivations.

On the other hand, I can't imagine what would motivate an enormous community medical researchers to make a DNA vaccine using one really cool technology (magnetic nanoparticles), and then claim to have made an mRNA vaccine.  Why wouldn't they tell the truth?  How did they convince the FDA to go along with the lie?  

What are you thinking happened?   How do you get from believing that it's possible to make a vaccine that includes magnetic nanoparticles, to believing that there's this giant conspiracy to hide the fact that they used this technology?

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Kanin said:

People in India and Brazil and Africa and all over the world are desperate to get the vaccine, and here in the USA there are all sorts of suspicions about how it's being used to "control" people, making them magnetic, secretly inserting microchips, etc. So many people have suffered and died. Why are more people not jumping for joy that brilliant scientists have finally gotten us out of this mess? 

Wondering if these sorts of things are happening in other countries, or if it's a phenomenon unique to the US. 

And politicians...certain politicians made it possible for the vaccine to be produced so quickly

commence thread explosion in 3, 2, 1...

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, BaseballandHockey said:

How do you think this applies to the covid vaccines, which the manufactures, FDA and CDA all say aren't DNA vaccines?

I can look at a YouTuber and think of a motivation for them to make a fake video.  Maybe they have monetized their channel, and they want views.  Maybe they want to be famous.  Maybe they believe the vaccine is dangerous and are making things up to convince people to avoid them.  I can imagine that a small number of people might choose to make false videos because of these motivations.

On the other hand, I can't imagine what would motivate an enormous community medical researchers to make a DNA vaccine using one really cool technology (magnetic nanoparticles), and then claim to have made an mRNA vaccine.  Why wouldn't they tell the truth?  How did they convince the FDA to go along with the lie?  

What are you thinking happened?   How do you get from believing that it's possible to make a vaccine that includes magnetic nanoparticles, to believing that there's this giant conspiracy to hide the fact that they used this technology?

1) my understanding is that JandJ is DNA based inside the adenovirus (DNA to code for spike protein)

2) I don’t see any reason why if magnetic nanoparticles help a vaccine to transfect into a cell more easily that would not also apply to mRNA based version.  (The nanoparticles could be in with the nano lipid envelope, or on, or in a gel form - I do not know that it is, but so far in my article reading see no reason it could not be.  With no “conspiracy” particularly needed, just trade secret* protection for some details on how it might have gotten done.) 
 

* afaik not all ingredients need to be revealed to public - some can be considered “proprietary “

Edited by Pen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Pen said:

1) my understanding is that JandJ is DNA based inside the adenovirus (DNA to code for spike protein)

2) I don’t see any reason why if magnetic nanoparticles help a vaccine to transfect into a cell more easily that would not also apply to mRNA based version. 
 

afaik not all ingredients need to be revealed to public

The videos that I have seen have referenced "second shot" which means they aren't J & J.  

Why would they hide this ingredient?  Why wouldn't they want to take credit for using super cool technology?

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, BaseballandHockey said:

The videos that I have seen have referenced "second shot" which means they aren't J & J.  
 

I had not seen it specified that magnets were sticking to injection sites after the mRNA type ones only

 

Eta: could you link something that shows that it’s the mRNA type only? 
 

Quote

Why would they hide this ingredient?  Why wouldn't they want to take credit for using super cool technology?


Perhaps to keep more market share, slow down competing manufacturers from getting more competing versions to market. I think that’s the usual reason behind trade secrets and proprietary ingredients. 
 

also they already had a novel mRNA form to get news coverage ... perhaps holding back another novel system for more buzz  to be revealed later - at booster time perhaps — might be an idea for maintaining interest and articles and TV footage when novel mRNA (at least novel in regard to use as a system to try to vaccinate humans) was no longer so buzz generating

Edited by Pen
Clarity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Pen said:

I had not seen it specified that magnets were sticking to injection sites after the mRNA type ones only

🤦‍♀️ They’re not sticking to injection sites at all! This illustrates perfectly how despite providing nothing but evidence against this “theory”, this thread is still serving to reinforce some people’s belief that this is a real thing. 
 

 

1 hour ago, Pen said:

 

also they already had a novel mRNA form to get news coverage ... perhaps holding back another novel system for more buzz  to be revealed later - at booster time perhaps — might be an idea for maintaining interest and articles and TV footage when novel mRNA (at least novel in regard to use as a system to try to vaccinate humans) was no longer so buzz generating

And all of this is a more logical, rational explanation than that the videos are fake and the vaccine is just a vaccine?

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Kanin said:

People in India and Brazil and Africa and all over the world are desperate to get the vaccine, and here in the USA there are all sorts of suspicions about how it's being used to "control" people, making them magnetic, secretly inserting microchips, etc. So many people have suffered and died. Why are more people not jumping for joy that brilliant scientists have finally gotten us out of this mess? 

Wondering if these sorts of things are happening in other countries, or if it's a phenomenon unique to the US. 

Interestingly, I have seen articles that suggest vaccine hesitancy is occurring in many places around the world. I just read something last week about a lot of resistance in India, even among healthcare workers and even in the midst of what they are going through.

I don’t know if there are videos about magnets or 5G being circulated in other languages or not, but I imagine the primary reason for hesitancy everywhere else is the same as it is here: not conspiracies, but questioning of the unknowns and perhaps some misunderstandings. 

 

Edited by Penelope
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Penelope said:

Interestingly, I have seen articles that suggest vaccine hesitancy is occurring in many places around the world. I just read something last week about a lot of resistance in India, even among healthcare workers and even in the midst of what they are going through.

I don’t know if there are videos about magnets or 5G being circulated in other languages or not, but I imagine the primary reason for hesitancy everywhere else is the same as it is here: not conspiracies, but questioning of the unknowns and perhaps some misunderstandings. 

 

I work with teams of software developers in India and Singapore. There are a lot of them waiting for the travel bans to lift so that they can purchase expensive tickets to the US for their entire families, pay for 3-4 weeks of local stay in the US and get vaccine shots and then fly back. Places like CA have no questions asked for vaccines and they are waiting to take advantage of that! To them it is mind boggling that top notch vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna have people refusing to take it because of suspicion whereas they have severe shortages and different technology that is not so effective. They would pay a huge sum of money for access to the vaccines that are being rejected by many Americans. They think that the US should donate the surplus to them! So, vaccine tourism is something we will see soon!

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...