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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I for one did not count Bibi out after to failing to secure a majority in--what is it 5 elections in a row now (losing count)?

He is wagging the dog. The raids on Al Aqsa were provocative and he got the response from Hamas that was his only path to remaining in power. And it works for Hamas as well. Extremists benefit from extremism. Feeds their power. 

Bill

Completely agree, and I am revolted by this senseless violence. It is a shonda against all Jews that the government is behaving this way. On MedTwitter, I have seen a Medecins Sans Frontieres location in Gaza that has been shelled. Of course, Hamas responds, endangering Israeli civilians. This cycle of violence is being perpetuated by those desperate to remain in power. 

Edited by SeaConquest
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5 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

I for one did not count Bibi out after to failing to secure a majority in--what is it 5 elections in a row now (losing count)?

He is wagging the dog. The raids on Al Aqsa were provocative and he got the response from Hamas that was his only path to remaining in power. And it works for Hamas as well. Extremists benefit from extremism. Feeds their power. 

Bill

Sadly, this all too true!

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3 minutes ago, Swimmer1112 said:

The violence against Jews been getting worse. After the Jewish synagogue shooting in Poway, my dh told the kids not to wear anything that identifies them as Jewish or tell people that they are Jewish. Which was very sad for my son, who is very proud of being Jewish.

I am sorry that your dh feels that way, but I do understand. My younger DS was at the JCC preschool in La Jolla when they were having the bomb threats a few years ago and had to be evacuated several times. It was very unnerving. My oldest is going to a Jewish camp this summer and I do often worry about the kids being targeted when they are all grouped together. 

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Just now, SeaConquest said:

I am sorry that your dh feels that way, but I do understand. My younger DS was at the JCC preschool in La Jolla when they were having the bomb threats a few years ago and had to be evacuated several times. It was very unnerving. My oldest is going to a Jewish camp this summer and I do often worry about the kids being targeted when they are all grouped together. 

We've dealt with a JCC bomb threat in Austin as well, IIRC. 

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19 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

I am a Jew. I support a strong defense for Israel, as it is surrounded by adversaries whose mission each day is to actively work towards its annihilation. I also pray for a two-state solution that will build a peaceful, liberal democracy for the Palestinians. Perhaps, that is a unicorn.

As for Christian support, I know it is an unpopular opinion, but as Bill said, I don't think most of these fervent Israel supporters give a hoot about Jews. It's all about the second coming of the big man for them, and Jews have no place in that world to come. So, forgive me if I am not impressed by this faux support.  

ETA: I also agree with Yael and Bill re Bibi. Times up, buddy. 

I have questions about your first paragraph but I would prefer to keep it private so you won't have to justify your responses to others if you don't mind my messaging you. 

As for the Christian supporters, I can't speak for everyone but if you had asked me last year I would say I stand with Israel without any real knowledge as to why other than it being  Biblically  the right thing to do which is connected to the second coming.  Yes, it is disingenuous and wrong and something I am trying to rectify now.  

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5 minutes ago, Swimmer1112 said:

The violence against Jews been getting worse. After the Jewish synagogue shooting in Poway, my dh told the kids not to wear anything that identifies them as Jewish or tell people that they are Jewish. Which was very sad for my son, who is very proud of being Jewish.

The members of our family who identity as Orthodox Jews still dress and such like we always have. But I won't lie, I looked at my son's tzitzis (ritual fringes) sticking out from his shirt today on our walk and my anxiety level racheted up a couple notches. My husband and older kids are crack shots but we don't own a gun (yet). In MA it's hard to get an unlimited licence to carry. I hate that even my non-Jewish father offers to give us a gun for our safety.

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22 minutes ago, YaelAldrich said:

It's really nice to think that everyone makes that distinction. Too many people do not. Which is why I fear for my children's and my safety. The people who spat on my friend's child and get friend didn't ask if they were pro-Zionist or even Israeli. They just knew they were Jewish (because of their dress I'm assuming).

I am sorry for that. I didn't make that distinction because of ignorance. Even so I wouldn't stand for mistreatment of a Jew, Israeli, or Zionist or any other label you want. It is so wrong.  So an Israeli can be Jewish but not every Jew is Israeli and not every Israeli is Jewish?  Not every Jew and Israeli is pro-Zionist, correct? Is there a term for one that is anti-zionist? 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, YaelAldrich said:

There are so many times when the Israeli Arab (Christian and Muslim)/ Palestinian Arab people and Israeli Jews come together in peace and just plain old normal, everyday events. They know and we know if many of both sides' leaders would get out of the way some form of peaceful coexistence could happen. But those leaders can't have that happen.

Yes, this is true. For the most part Jewish Israelis and Arab Israelis have lived in peace, and often in friendship.

I've know enough people from both communities to realize how much the two people have in common and that there are more reasons to be friends than enemies. And through history, most of the experience of Jews living with Arabs has been a positive (certainly far better than the average Jewish experience living in Christendom).

The Rambam (aka Maimonides aka Musa bin Maymun) refashioned Judaism, writing extensively in Arabic while living in Islamic Spain during a Jewish "Golden Age."

Many will claim these peoples are born to be at each other's throats and that the conflict is inevitable. I could not disagree more.

Bill

 

 

Edited by Spy Car
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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Swimmer1112 said:

The violence against Jews been getting worse. After the Jewish synagogue shooting in Poway, my dh told the kids not to wear anything that identifies them as Jewish or tell people that they are Jewish. Which was very sad for my son, who is very proud of being Jewish.

It is sad. I also know that in the mid-80's that I was wearing a keffiyeh that was given to me by my dear friend (and current UN ambassador) while I was out for a walk in Sherman Oaks, and I was very nearly run down by people who must have taken it as a political statement on my part against Israel. That keffiyeh remains folded in my closet.

Bill

Edited by Spy Car
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4 minutes ago, LongRamblings said:

I am sorry for that. I didn't make that distinction because of ignorance. Even so I wouldn't stand for mistreatment of a Jew, Israeli, or Zionist or any other label you want. It is so wrong.  So an Israeli can be Jewish but not every Jew is Israeli and not every Israeli is Jewish?  Not every Jew and Israeli is pro-Zionist, correct? Is there a term for one that is anti-zionist? 

Not every Israeli is Jewish. Not every Jew has Israeli citizenship (although anyone who has at least one Jewish grandparent and had not converted to another religion can take automatic citizenship). Not every Jew NOR  Israeli is a pro-Zionist. There are Jews who are not Zionist for religious reasons (Neturei Karta are the most famous group) and for political reasons (usually far left wing).  In history, the Reform movement was not Zionist although that changed around the times of the birth of the country of Israel. Most everyone else is a little to very much Zionist. 

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

It is sad. I also know that in the mid-80's that I was wearing a keffiyeh that was given to me my dear friend (and current UN ambassador) while I was out for a walk in Sherman Oaks, and I was very nearly run down by people who must have taken it as a political statement on my part against Israel. That keffiyeh remains folded in my closet.

Bill

When my dh flew internationally in the 80’s, his parents had him and his siblings wear a Christian cross. They were afraid of all hijackings and violence against Jews.

Edited by SDMomof3
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23 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

Completely agree, and I am revolted by this senseless violence. It is a shonda against all Jews that the government is behaving this way. On MedTwitter, I have seen a Medecins San Frontieres location in Gaza that has been shelled. Of course, Hamas responds, endangering Israeli civilians. This cycle of violence is being perpetuated by those desperate to remain in power. 

Yep. The maximalists need each other to cling to power.

It is a mutually beneficial arrangement for them. Everyone else gets screwed.

Bill 

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26 minutes ago, LongRamblings said:

I have questions about your first paragraph but I would prefer to keep it private so you won't have to justify your responses to others if you don't mind my messaging you. 

As for the Christian supporters, I can't speak for everyone but if you had asked me last year I would say I stand with Israel without any real knowledge as to why other than it being  Biblically  the right thing to do which is connected to the second coming.  Yes, it is disingenuous and wrong and something I am trying to rectify now.  

You do know what the fate of Jews is (if they don't see the light) when there is a second coming, right? I don't mean to sound snarky here, but right-wing Christian support for Israel isn't necessarily rooted in friendship from my perspective.

Bill

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6 minutes ago, SDMomof3 said:

When my dh flew internationally in the 80’s, his parents had him and his siblings wear a Christian cross. They were afraid of all hijackings and violence against Jews.

What a sad commentary. I believe it. 

Bill

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, SDMomof3 said:

When my dh flew internationally in the 80’s, his parents had him and his siblings wear a Christian cross. They were afraid of all hijackings and violence against Jews.

I've been almost blown up twice in Jerusalem and my husband and I missed being blown to smithereens on our anniversary  while visiting there. It's a small country. Everyone knows some someone who has died or been in a terror attack. I'm sure it's possible for Palestinians to have the same thing.

And yet, I'm chomping at the bit to go back. If I would get tickets to go I would. But Israel is smartly not letting in tourists right now.

Edited by YaelAldrich
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13 minutes ago, YaelAldrich said:

Not every Israeli is Jewish. Not every Jew has Israeli citizenship (although anyone who has at least one Jewish grandparent and had not converted to another religion can take automatic citizenship). Not every Jew NOR  Israeli is a pro-Zionist. There are Jews who are not Zionist for religious reasons (Neturei Karta are the most famous group) and for political reasons (usually far left wing).  In history, the Reform movement was not Zionist although that changed around the times of the birth of the country of Israel. Most everyone else is a little to very much Zionist. 

A complex situation to be sure.

The most rabidly anti-Zionist person I ever knew was far-left (communist) Jewish woman.

I found out later that she had an acquaintanceship with one of my best friends here in LA prior to our meeting (a male modern orthodox Zionist Jew) and what a story he told of her being a guest at his Seder and her responses to the "questions."

It was evidently an epic event.

Bill

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13 minutes ago, Catwoman said:

I remember you, too, Kahlanne!!!

It’s great to see you back here again!

When I first saw Kahlanne, I read it as Kahane (due to the context, I suppose) and shuddered a little.

Bill

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13 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

You do know what the fate of Jews is (if they don't see the light) when there is a second coming, right? I don't mean to sound snarky here, but right-wing Christian support for Israel isn't necessarily rooted in friendship from my perspective.

Bill

Oh I understand and honestly I am not well versed in the second coming as a Christian.  I find Revelation and all the dispute about the second coming tiring and honestly it has created more fear in my mind than necessary. I figure that as a Christian I just have to believe Jesus will come back, live according to his commandments, repent more times than imaginable but still not enough, and let Him worry about when to return. I am not saying I shouldn't try to learn about that time but I just am not in the right place with my walk to focus on that time right now. I also see how this is considered unfriendly to unbelievers at the very least but they have the choice to believe in Jesus or not just as I do. They can choose their own religion or lack of one.  I am sure not everything in every religion is favorable to myself as a nonbeliever or Christian. I don't force my beliefs on them. 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, LongRamblings said:

I am sorry for that. I didn't make that distinction because of ignorance. Even so I wouldn't stand for mistreatment of a Jew, Israeli, or Zionist or any other label you want. It is so wrong.  So an Israeli can be Jewish but not every Jew is Israeli and not every Israeli is Jewish?  Not every Jew and Israeli is pro-Zionist, correct? Is there a term for one that is anti-zionist? 

People of goodwill who are anti-Zionist are generally called "anti-Zionist."

Those who are not of goodwill are generally labeled with other terms. I hope that's not too subtle.

Bill

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3 minutes ago, LongRamblings said:

Oh I understand and honestly I am not well versed in the second coming as a Christian.  I find Revelation and all the dispute about the second coming tiring and honestly it has created more fear in my mind than necessary. I figure that as a Christian I just have to believe Jesus will come back, live according to his commandments, repent more times than imaginable but still not enough, and let Him worry about when to return. I am not saying I shouldn't try to learn about that time but I just am not in the right place with my walk to focus on that time right now. I also see how this is considered unfriendly to unbelievers at the very least but they have the choice to believe in Jesus or not just as I do. They can choose their own religion or lack of one.  I am sure not everything in every religion is favorable to myself as a nonbeliever or Christian. I don't force my beliefs on them. 

I'm just trying to convey that there has been the perception of a shift in support among right-wing Christianity (and excuse the generalizations here) over the decades from rather hostile anti-Semitism to today's rather strong support for Israel.

The "support" for Israel on a political level masks some uncomfortable truths in my estimation. I'm endeavoring to give you the unvarnished truth as I see it.

Bill

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I remember watching the news as a child in the 1970s, when it was still required to be factual, and every night seeing kids with stones fighting soldiers with military weapons who had invaded their neighborhoods.  IMO, Israel needs to give the Palestinians back their land and allow them to govern themselves.  I am not anti-Jewish, but I AM anti-whatever-horrors-the-Israeli-government-has-been-doing-for-the-past-50-years.

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I don't support a Jewish state because of the Bible, but because within living memory, Jews were subject to extermination en masse, and the world largely ignored their plight. Never again. The only route to peace must involve recognition of Israel's right to exist, and to defend itself against existential threat and terror. 

Signed,

Long time pro-Palestinian agnostic leftist. Supporting the existence of Israel is not just something for right wing Christians. 

 

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1 minute ago, Melissa Louise said:

I don't support a Jewish state because of the Bible, but because within living memory, Jews were subject to extermination en masse, and the world largely ignored their plight. Never again. The only route to peace must involve recognition of Israel's right to exist, and to defend itself against existential threat and terror. 

Signed,

Long time pro-Palestinian agnostic leftist. Supporting the existence of Israel is not just something for right wing Christians. 

 

I guess the hell--that neither of us believe in--has finally frozen over? :tongue:

Bill

 

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2 hours ago, YaelAldrich said:

It's really nice to think that everyone makes that distinction. Too many people do not. Which is why I fear for my children's and my safety. The people who spat on my friend's child and get friend didn't ask if they were pro-Zionist or even Israeli. They just knew they were Jewish (because of their dress I'm assuming).

 

Well... tbh, I think it's probable that those people were looking for an excuse. They're bad, hateful people who hate Jews, and like to be able to say "Look how awful Israel is!" But if it wasn't for Israel, they'd find some other excuse.

Just like some people are bad, hateful people who just hate Muslims and look at any bad action done by any Muslim person or nation to spit on Muslims.

The advanced move, of course, is to hate both of them while simultaneously blaming both (all) Jews and (all) Muslims for the sorry state in the Mideast and possibly the world.

 

*hugs*

 

I'm  sorry any child has to go through anything like that.

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18 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

 

Well... tbh, I think it's probable that those people were looking for an excuse. They're bad, hateful people who hate Jews, and like to be able to say "Look how awful Israel is!" But if it wasn't for Israel, they'd find some other excuse.

Just like some people are bad, hateful people who just hate Muslims and look at any bad action done by any Muslim person or nation to spit on Muslims.

The advanced move, of course, is to hate both of them while simultaneously blaming both (all) Jews and (all) Muslims for the sorry state in the Mideast and possibly the world.

 

*hugs*

 

I'm  sorry any child has to go through anything like that.

I understand if people don't think that Israel has done the "right" thing now or ever. I might even get that people think Israel as a secular state shouldn't exist. But almost every time those people open their mouths somehow it drifts into age old anti-JEWISH tropes.

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2 hours ago, YaelAldrich said:

I've been almost blown up twice in Jerusalem and my husband and I missed being blown to smithereens on our anniversary  while visiting there. It's a small country. Everyone knows some someone who has died or been in a terror attack. I'm sure it's possible for Palestinians to have the same thing.

My stepsister had to call in a suicide bomber, I believe. As you say, it's a small country -- EVERYONE has some experience with terrorism. 

I can't link the article since it's too political, but I linked an article in the Politics board about the idea of "high fear" and "high trust" social context and what politics they lead to. Quite simply, Israel is not a high trust country. I don't want to live in Israel, because I don't think you can ultimately live with this level of distrust in your neighbors and not be affected. But I am also aware that it's only my luck that allows me to live in a high trust context.

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4 hours ago, Melissa Louise said:

I don't support a Jewish state because of the Bible, but because within living memory, Jews were subject to extermination en masse, and the world largely ignored their plight. Never again. The only route to peace must involve recognition of Israel's right to exist, and to defend itself against existential threat and terror. 

Signed,

Long time pro-Palestinian agnostic leftist. Supporting the existence of Israel is not just something for right wing Christians. 

 

I do always wonder how things would have turned out if they’d gone with the Australian option.

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17 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I do always wonder how things would have turned out if they’d gone with the Australian option.

I'd never heard of an Australian option for a Jewish state.

Ultimately the problem is that while there is justification for Israel to exist given the genocide perpetrated against the Jewish people, does that justify where it is? Why must the Palestinians pay the price for the crimes of Europe? 

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7 hours ago, Faith-manor said:

Whoa!!! I have words. None are polite enough to be shared on this forum.

This is what is scaring me. Fascists coming out of the woodwork. I would prefer they stay in their holes afraid to come out.

Fascists isn't the correct term to use here. These were not Neo-Nazis and don't come from the right-wing. 

What's happening is that opinions about Israel are gradually beginning to change in the USA. Trevor Noah and John Oliver's recent pieces are good examples of changing opinions. I have some issues with both pieces but it seems obvious that the tide is changing. 

Jewish people and Israel are linked in the minds of most Americans. That's not unreasonable. It was defined as a "Jewish state" in its founding document. These people are taking out their anger at Israel on Jewish Americans. It's bigoted and it's wrong but it's not motivated by fascism. This would be like an American being assaulted because of anger at the American government. Or Japanese Americans attacked because of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. 

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

I'd never heard of an Australian option for a Jewish state.

Ultimately the problem is that while there is justification for Israel to exist given the genocide perpetrated against the Jewish people, does that justify where it is? Why must the Palestinians pay the price for the crimes of Europe? 

Yes but I don’t thing it was that black and white.  The Jewish people that originally migrated there had agency and came for their own reasons as I understand it.  It wasn’t purely case of Europe deciding that’s how it should be.  The reason that the Australian option didn’t happen was because not enough people were interested or willing to move there.

Im very willing to be corrected by those more knowledgeable.  I did a fair bit of reading about this bit of history in high school but that was probably one sided and a long time back.

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Yes but I don’t thing it was that black and white.  The Jewish people that originally migrated there had agency and came for their own reasons as I understand it.  It wasn’t purely case of Europe deciding that’s how it should be.  The reason that the Australian option didn’t happen was because not enough people were interested or willing to move there.

Im very willing to be corrected by those more knowledgeable.  I did a fair bit of reading about this bit of history in high school but that was probably one sided and a long time back.

It's not that Europe decided but that Europe is responsible for the holocaust, not the Palestinians. The persecution of the Jewish people is unusually given as justification for a Jewish state. Not unreasonable but why not take Berlin and make that the Jewish state? Obviously there is history here so it's most complicated than that but the people are Berlin were much more responsible for the Holocaust then the people living in Palestine. 

One of the big myths that many of us were taught was a "land without a people for a people without a land." The Jewish people were a "people without a land" because of anti-semitism. Anti-semitism is not unique to Europe but it took its most deadly form in Europe. Palestine, however, was not a "land without a people." People lived there. Why are those people reasonable for the sins of Europe? 

Edited by Ordinary Shoes
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22 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Yes but I don’t thing it was that black and white.  The Jewish people that originally migrated there had agency and came for their own reasons as I understand it.  It wasn’t purely case of Europe deciding that’s how it should be.  The reason that the Australian option didn’t happen was because not enough people were interested or willing to move there.

Im very willing to be corrected by those more knowledgeable.  I did a fair bit of reading about this bit of history in high school but that was probably one sided and a long time back.

This is a good video that goes through the history. 

 

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It has gotten pretty nasty out there and I have seen some, not sure if I should call it borderline anti-semitism, or actual antisemitism.   But pretty disturbing stuff.   Anyway, there were Jews living in the land during the Ottoman rule, which was basically a colonialist force.   It’s also interesting that as Jewish immigration to the area increased so did Arab immigration.   Then the British acquired the area in the aftermath of WW1 and the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.  And the British had made promises both Jews and Arabs before and during WW1.   

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27 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

It's not that Europe decided but that Europe is responsible for the holocaust, not the Palestinians. The persecution of the Jewish people is unusually given as justification for a Jewish state. Not unreasonable but why not take Berlin and make that the Jewish state? Obviously there is history here so it's most complicated than that but the people are Berlin were much more responsible for the Holocaust then the people living in Palestine. 

One of the big myths that many of us were taught was a "land without a people for a people without a land." The Jewish people were a "people without a land" because of anti-semitism. Anti-semitism is not unique to Europe but it took its most deadly form in Europe. Palestine, however, was not a "land without a people." People lived there. Why are those people reasonable for the sins of Europe? 

Isn’t this becoming a more significant problem due to population growth though?  From what I can see statistically the population has increased from around 1 to 5 million in the last 50 years.  I know there are issues with accuracy with early census I’m not sure about the 1950s though.

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There's a ceasefire. We'll see how long it lasts, but Palestinians were celebrating so that's a good sign.

As far as American attitudes changing from unconditionally pro-Israeli to something more nuanced, the President pledged humanitarian aid.

 

Quote

The president said the US "remains committed to working with the United Nations" in providing humanitarian assistance to Gaza and in reconstruction efforts in the enclave. He added that this would be done "in full partnership with the Palestinian Authority, not Hamas".

 

There's a good overview at 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-57195537

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

This is a good video that goes through the history. 

 

Well, I just watched the video and must say that it is a very curious mix of truths combined with very serious omissions that I think could create considerable misimpressions among your average member of Jane Q Public who might not have extensive knowledge of the history of Israel/Palestine.

Too tired to get into the details tonight. Perhaps tomorrow? Maybe.

Parts of this were better than I expected, other parts not so much.

And not that it matters to the substance of the video, but despite his dramatic "emphasis" when pronouncing Arabic names, Dr Foster doesn't speak in a fashion that resembles a native tongue. Petty? Perhaps, but I found it irksome after awhile.

And the video has much bigger issues that his Arabic skills.

Bill

 

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4 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Well, I just watched the video and must saw that it is a very curious mix of truths combined with very serious omissions that I think could create considerable misimpressions among your average member of Jane Q Public who might not have extensive knowledge of the history of Israel/Palestine.

Too tired to get into the details tonight. Perhaps tomorrow? Maybe.

Parts of this were better than I expected, other parts not so much.

And not that it matters to the substance of the video, but despite his dramatic "emphasis" when pronouncing Arabic names, Dr Foster doesn't speak in a fashion that resembles a native tongue. Petty? Perhaps, but I found it irksome after awhile.

And the video has much bigger issues that his Arabic skills.

Bill

 

I did feel like he had some weird quirky non professional stuff going on.  Most of the older info I knew I’m more fuzzy on what’s happened in the last 20 years I guess.  

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1 hour ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Isn’t this becoming a more significant problem due to population growth though?  From what I can see statistically the population has increased from around 1 to 5 million in the last 50 years.  I know there are issues with accuracy with early census I’m not sure about the 1950s though.

Yes, population growth is a problem. The portion of the population that is Arab is increasing. How do you maintain a "Jewish state" when a significant portion of the population is not Jewish? The answer to that is pretty obvious but I'll leave it unsaid. 

 

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8 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I did feel like he had some weird quirky non professional stuff going on.  Most of the older info I knew I’m more fuzzy on what’s happened in the last 20 years I guess.  

Even the older stuff is problematic. I'm limiting myself to one example (as I'm knackered) but Foster at about the 10 minute mark mentions that Haj Amin al-Husseini, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, was "exiled." True, he was exiled.

But where did he go? Whose cause did he take up and promote? The answer matters. It was omitted. Skipped over entirely. One of dozens of such omissions.

Bill

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25 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

Yes, population growth is a problem. The portion of the population that is Arab is increasing. How do you maintain a "Jewish state" when a significant portion of the population is not Jewish? The answer to that is pretty obvious but I'll leave it unsaid. 

 

I think this is fundamentally the problem though isn’t it?  
 

What is the explanation for the population growth?  Is it modern medicine?  

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OP, I recently read City of a Thousand Gates by Rebecca Sacks. It's a fictional account of life in Jerusalem and an adjacent camp, both Israeli and Arab. There are all sorts of characters that interact: an American Jewish woman married to an Israeli, a German freelance journalist, an Israeli settler soccer player, an Arab Israeli soccer player, a Palestinian professor of English and male and female Palestinian college students. It covers the reaction to the murder of a Settler girl, the retaliation against a Palestinian boy who had nothing to do with that and the violence that ensues. The book gives a good overview of the complexity of the situation while still being a good story that you will want to read. The author is an American who got her MA in Tel Aviv, so she has experience living in Israel but the emotional distance to see the conflict as a third party rather than a participant. 

If you're up for a non-fiction account, I'd highly recommend Rise and Kill First by Ronen Bergman, an Israeli journalist who got some amazing interviews with Mossad and Israeli Defense Force sources. It traces the history of Israeli's targeted assassination program and explains its unintended consequence of constantly pushing Palestinian politics to more extreme positions. This book was on a lot of Best Books of 2019 lists because of its startling revelations and the careful analysis of the consequences of Israeli policy.

 

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