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Minimum needed in kitchen for short stay


Kassia
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Dd is going to be subletting an apartment OOS for one month this summer.  She won't have a car and can't bring much with her since she's flying.  She is renting a storage unit nearby so has a place to store things she buys, but it's a small storage unit and I don't know how much room is left in it (her dorm stuff is in there).  There's a Target and Walmart nearby and I assume she can order from Amazon and use Amazon locker.  

What do you think would be the bare minimum she would need for that month in the kitchen?  

 

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Is this kitchen stocked with anything already?

If she is willing to wash dishes every time she uses them, she could get away with one plate, one bowl, one cup/mug, one fork/spoon/knife. But I think she would prefer to have at least two of each of these, and a set of four of each would let her wash dishes once a day (I would think she would not need four bowls, but it depends on what she likes to eat).

One small frying pan with one spatula. One small pot and a wooden spoon. A ladle. A sharp knife and cutting board. Can opener. Rubber spatula. Dish cloths and towels (2-4 of each). Dish soap. A coffee maker, if she drinks coffee. Colander for draining pasta and rinsing fresh food. A set of Rubbermaid type containers for leftovers (or glass versions, if she prefers to avoid plastic). A vegetable peeler. A set of measuring spoons and measuring cups.

If she will not be making much of her own food and will just microwave things or eat out, she won't need all of these things. But with this list, I could manage easily for a month.

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Minimum for backpacking: A knife.  A pot & pan. Two potholders. A spork. A small cutting board. A couple water bottles.  Dish soap. A scrub brush or sponge.  Dishes if she wants them (rather than eating out of the pans).  Disposable dishes if she’d rather have the convenience than eat out of the cookware.

I’d want a lot more for a family, but if I was alone I’d just do that.

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We've always had a kitchen box available for long moves.  It had:
small baking sheet (dollar store)
pot holder
1 medium pot
1 frying pan
1 cutting board & 2 knives
1 set of mixing bowls (big, medium, small)
spatula, cook spoon, tongs, whisk
strainer
measuring cups and spoons
coffee mugs
set of kitchen ware: plates, bowls, cups, silverware
Can opener/corkscrew

Everything fits in a short rubbermaid tub.  Our first stop is always to pick up those cardboard salt & pepper shakers, foil, paper towels, and coffee, tea, sugar.  I end up buying the Badia(?) spice bags because they're cheap and things we use often, but they take up minimal room and I don't mind ditching them if need be..

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12 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

Is this kitchen stocked with anything already?

 

Kitchen will be empty.  Move-in condition.  

Thank you to everyone for your replies - you have been SO helpful!  I tend to overdo everything and can't do that in this situation.  

 

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44 minutes ago, Katy said:

Minimum for backpacking: A knife.  A pot & pan. Two potholders. A spork. A small cutting board. A couple water bottles.  Dish soap. A scrub brush or sponge.  Dishes if she wants them (rather than eating out of the pans).  Disposable dishes if she’d rather have the convenience than eat out of the cookware.

I’d want a lot more for a family, but if I was alone I’d just do that.

Oh yeah, I forgot caffeine because my favorite source is Diet Coke.  She may need a teakettle or coffee pot and a mug.

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Posted (edited)

I would buy more than anyone else has suggested, and plan on donating it all at the end. 

You can get a whole set of nonstick cookware for a very low price at places like Walmart. Ditto for a 4 place setting set of Corelle. A set of inexpensive flatware would be cheap, too. Things like cookie sheets/baking pans and a colander are inexpensive as well.  If she needs things like coffee mugs, drinking glasses, or other small kitchen things, she can get them at a Goodwill if she wants to keep it cheap, or just buy the basic things like spatulas, slotted spoons, and other little things at Dollar Tree. But get her a decent can opener, because a lot of the super cheap ones don’t work right, and at least one good knife.

Buying one of this and one of that is a nuisance for daily living. I would bet she could get all of the things I mentioned above for under $100 if she is a good shopper, and it will make her life so much easier. 

If she needs things like a toaster, a microwave, a teakettle, or a coffee maker, those don’t cost much, either, if she doesn’t care about name brands — and she shouldn’t, because even cheap small appliances will work fine for short term use.

One other add-on — disposable plates in a few different sizes, plus some napkins and paper towels. 

Edited by Catwoman
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There are kitchen starter sets at places like Target and Wal-Mart that include basic pots, pans, and cooking utensils - often with knives as well. I'd get that, a cheap dishware set, a cheap flatware set, a set of tumblers and a couple of coffee mugs, and a cookie sheet. Plus a coffeemaker if she'll want one.

If you want to try and use less, you could also hit a good thrift store if they have them in the area, but honestly, it'll probably come out more expensive that way, so I'd only do it if you're dedicated to using less.

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Posted (edited)

I was just thinking that some people might think my suggestions are excessive, but Kassia’s dd will be living in this place for a whole month, and I think she will be much happier if she has some basic conveniences. 

Even assuming that she will donate everything at the end of the month, if she spends $100 on her kitchen setup, that only amounts to $25 per week, and $200 is only $50 per week for the use of all of those items, and that would give her a much better experience than if she was trying to make do with as little as a few people here are suggesting. The benefits seem to far outweigh the monetary cost.

Edited by Catwoman
Grammar is not my friend today.
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She might want to get some basics at Goodwill since this is temporary and then donate them at the end.

I would be tempted to buy her an instapot and have it delivered there. It is just so handy for making a variety of healthy, one pot meals.

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For one month you can be very minimal.  (We've done this more times than I can count!)

One medium sauce pan with lid, one frying/saute pan (with or without a lid).  Does she like to bake?   An 8x8 or 9x13 baking dish can be used for a lot of different things. 

A roll of foil on hand to use as lids for frying pan or baking dish, or even a makeshift cookie sheet.  Also, to warm bread in, cover leftovers, etc.

Some kind of coffee maker if coffee is important to her.  (A standard drip, a French press, etc.)

I wouldn't bother with a separate tea kettle.  You can heat water in the sauce pan.

2-4 sets of plates/bowls/glasses/mugs/silverware.

Spatula, paring knife, chopping/butcher-type knife, serrated knife, a large serving/stirring spoon, a whisk, a wooden spoon, a potato peeler, a corkscrew/bottle opener, a can opener.

A toaster.

A microwave is nice but not essential.  (I wouldn't spend money on one for just a month.)

Plastic wrap, boxes of ziplock bags in sandwich size and gallon size.  (Gallon sizes work great for storing leftovers in freezer.)

One large mixing bow.  (Can double as a salad bowl.)

Two of each:  Placemats, dishtowels, hand towels, potholders.

When we're staying somewhere for a month, we do tend to be extra careful about saving things.  If we get anything that comes in a plastic container with a lid, we save the container and use it to store leftovers.  (Like cottage cheese containers, yogurt containers, deli foods, etc.)  I re-wash ziplock bags and plastic produce bags to use again, and save and reuse foil if it didn't get messy.

I tend to use a grater a lot so would probably add that, but could certainly do without it if I had to.

Of course dish soap, sponges, all purpose kitchen cleaning spray, coffee filters...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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it sounds as if this is in the same town as her college.  Does she already have some basic things for her dorm room like plate, cup, bowls?  Are there particular things that she might purchase, like a coffee pot or tea kettle, that she would use once she moved back into her dorm?  Does she have any friends in the town she can borrow a few items from?  

How much will she actually be in the apartment (is she taking a class and will be in the apartment most of the day and night or is she working a summer job that will have her away from the apartment most of the day?)  Does she like to cook and if so what?  Will she be cooking a frozen pizza? Buying a roasted chicken and making several meals off of it? Frying up bacon and egg?  I would start with what she is likely to be wanting to fix to eat and work from there. 

For one month with one person if she has a refrigerator, an oven, stove, and microwave she can get by with very little.  If she has a couple of large mugs they can be used for coffee or tea, but they can also be used to heat oatmeal, serve as a bowl for ice cream or soup, etc.  Sometimes a container (8oz water bottle, liter water bottle, etc.) can be used for an approximate measuring cup device.  

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7 hours ago, Faith-manor said:

\

I would be tempted to buy her an instapot and have it delivered there. It is just so handy for making a variety of healthy, one pot meals.

I have a nice slow cooker here that we're bringing down when we move her into her dorm in August, but there's no way to get it down to her for the one month stay.  

 

 

5 hours ago, Bootsie said:

it sounds as if this is in the same town as her college.  Does she already have some basic things for her dorm room like plate, cup, bowls?  Are there particular things that she might purchase, like a coffee pot or tea kettle, that she would use once she moved back into her dorm?  Does she have any friends in the town she can borrow a few items from?  

How much will she actually be in the apartment (is she taking a class and will be in the apartment most of the day and night or is she working a summer job that will have her away from the apartment most of the day?)  Does she like to cook and if so what?  Will she be cooking a frozen pizza? Buying a roasted chicken and making several meals off of it? Frying up bacon and egg?  I would start with what she is likely to be wanting to fix to eat and work from there. 

 

She'll have a microwave/full kitchen and is working from the apartment.  She has a few basic kitchen items from her dorm - last year she didn't have a kitchen, but this coming year she will.  Unfortunately, she doesn't have a car and will have to put anything she buys into storage until she moves into her dorm later in the summer so she doesn't want many more additional items.  She eats basic, healthy foods most of the time.  We might test out some convenience foods before she leaves just to make things easier once she's there.  More likely to buy a rotisserie chicken and make eggs than buy a frozen pizza.  

 

4 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I would require some means of making coffee, but not everyone is burdened (blessed?) with my addiction :tongue:

@Storygirl (and others) have done a pretty good job outlining the essentials.

Bill

 

She's not a coffee drinker so one less thing to think about!  

 

A big THANK YOU for all the wonderful and helpful responses!  The hive is the BEST! 

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I would look at a kitchen in a box set as a starting point, adding in 2-4 drinking glasses, a colander, a baking pan, a glass measuring cup, pot holders, kitchen towels, chip clips, dish cloths/sponges, and ziplock bags. 

Think about the foods she is most likely to prepare. Rice?  A rice cooker is handy.  Sheet pan meals? She may want two baking pans. Casseroles? Add a couple of casserole dishes.  

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Posted (edited)

I would pare most of these lists down considerably. It’s only a month. I’d take a pot, a pan that can go in the oven, a knife, a cutting board, tongs, chopsticks or cutlery, a bowl and a glass, several bar towels that can serve as potholders, and for washing and wiping.  Realistically, what would she be measuring that she’d need measuring cups and spoons for? She can eyeball it. Or a peeler? She can use the knife.  Or a colander? She can drain things with the lid on the pot. Lettuces can be washed in the pot, shaken with hands and then rolled up in a clean bar towel and popped in the fridge to crisp. Or a can opener? If she must have a can opener, get a camping one that fits in the palm of one’s hand. It’s called roughing it. She’ll learn to be creative. My one concession would probably be both a chef’s knife and a paring knife because no or bad knives are my one huge frustration when I’m traveling and in an ill-equipped kitchen. If she gets desperate she can ask a neighbor or go shopping. 

Edited by bibiche
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Posted (edited)

If there is a Goodwill or other thrift store nearby, she can grab some cheap plates, cups, etc and donate them back in a month.  Same for pots/pans etc.  Otherwise hit a dollar store for a few items.  And if she is working form home, no need for the slow cooker. Get a covered pan and she can slow cook a soup, beans, etc on the stove while she works. 

Edited by JFSinIL
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15 hours ago, Kassia said:

Dd is going to be subletting an apartment OOS for one month this summer.  She won't have a car and can't bring much with her since she's flying.  She is renting a storage unit nearby so has a place to store things she buys, but it's a small storage unit and I don't know how much room is left in it (her dorm stuff is in there).  There's a Target and Walmart nearby and I assume she can order from Amazon and use Amazon locker.  

What do you think would be the bare minimum she would need for that month in the kitchen?  

 

Will she have people over?

I’d want at least a set of four things for eating off of...4 plates, bowls, cutlery, cups, etc

that way, she wouldn’t have to wash right away for the next meal if she was in a hurry.

i also hate crowding food on a plate or putting food items on a plate that run into other foods. I’d rather have 2 plates than have my sauces run into my veggies.

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I am really surprised by how much a number of people are saying is the minimum a single young person needs in a kitchen for a month.  In February 2020 DD moved to Europe for grad school.  She moved into an apartment with a small fridge (no freezer), a stove, and an oven (no microwave).  She loves to cook. When I arrived in March, she had three cups (which had been given to her by the landlord), four plates, 4 wine glasses, some flatware, a paring knife, a bread knife, a pot with a lid, a skillet, a mixing bowl, a few wooden spoons, a cutting board, a corkscrew, a kitchen scale, a french press, and not much more.  She had fresh baked bread for me when I arrived.  We managed to get a few more items before the lockdown occurred, But I was there with her for almost three months without much additional.  

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52 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

I am really surprised by how much a number of people are saying is the minimum a single young person needs in a kitchen for a month.  In February 2020 DD moved to Europe for grad school.  She moved into an apartment with a small fridge (no freezer), a stove, and an oven (no microwave).  She loves to cook. When I arrived in March, she had three cups (which had been given to her by the landlord), four plates, 4 wine glasses, some flatware, a paring knife, a bread knife, a pot with a lid, a skillet, a mixing bowl, a few wooden spoons, a cutting board, a corkscrew, a kitchen scale, a french press, and not much more.  She had fresh baked bread for me when I arrived.  We managed to get a few more items before the lockdown occurred, But I was there with her for almost three months without much additional.  

Yup. You don’t need a lot of equipment to make good food. I’d posit that one becomes a better and more creative cook with fewer things. 

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Posted (edited)

Agreeing with PP to buy secondhand at Goodwill, or garage sales.
Freecycle or FB Marketplace frequently has free stuff like this, when people declutter their kitchens.
She can just use what she finds?!?
We give some start-up cash to each of our kids in this situation, so they get to keep the cash they don't spend.

Also she can buy a few items, then add as needed over the summer.

ETA = I didn't realize she didn't have a car, AND my suggestions are a rabbit trail.  Sorry!

Edited by Beth S
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Bootsie said:

I am really surprised by how much a number of people are saying is the minimum a single young person needs in a kitchen for a month.  In February 2020 DD moved to Europe for grad school.  She moved into an apartment with a small fridge (no freezer), a stove, and an oven (no microwave).  She loves to cook. When I arrived in March, she had three cups (which had been given to her by the landlord), four plates, 4 wine glasses, some flatware, a paring knife, a bread knife, a pot with a lid, a skillet, a mixing bowl, a few wooden spoons, a cutting board, a corkscrew, a kitchen scale, a french press, and not much more.  She had fresh baked bread for me when I arrived.  We managed to get a few more items before the lockdown occurred, But I was there with her for almost three months without much additional.  

Some of us are minimalists. Others are maximalists.

Can you guess which one I am? 😉 

Edited by Catwoman
3 sentences and two typos. I am pathetic.
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1 hour ago, bibiche said:

Yup. You don’t need a lot of equipment to make good food. I’d posit that one becomes a better and more creative cook with fewer things. 

I'd argue that's true. On the other hand, I keep adding things to an already vast arsenal. LOL.

Is that what's called cognitive dissonance?

Bill

 

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I might be weird but I like to use pyrex a lot. You can eat out of it, freeze it, bake in it, and store in the fridge with the plastic lid. I just bought a new set which is on rollback on Walmart right now. I frequently used the pyrex bowls as ordinary bowls (2 cup size or 4 cup size). Just an idea she could get a couple of those. I have also been known to use them as measuring cups in a pinch lol. 

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12 minutes ago, Beth S said:

Agreeing with PP to buy secondhand at Goodwill, or garage sales.
Freecycle or FB Marketplace frequently has free stuff like this, when people declutter their kitchens.
She can just use what she finds?!?
We give some start-up cash to each of our kids in this situation, so they get to keep the cash they don't spend.

Also she can buy a few items, then add as needed over the summer.

She doesn't have a car, but is on a bus route.  I'll have to look to see what is available.  

 

4 minutes ago, Catwoman said:

Some of us are minimalists. Others are maximalists.

Can you guess which one I am? 😉 

I'm very much a buy/bring "in case you need it" and it's always too much.  I need to avoid that kind of thinking in this situation, which is why I asked here! 

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4 minutes ago, Catwoman said:

Some of us are minimalists. Others are maximalists.

Can you guess which one I am? 😉 

In my heart I think of myself as a "minimalist."

However when I look around my kitchen I find it hard to make the claim with a straight face.

I do make a concerted effort to add nothing that I'm not going to use. Only "essential" items. I tell myself.

Bill

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Just now, Spy Car said:

In my heart I think of myself as a "minimalist."

However when I look around my kitchen I find it hard to make the claim with a straight face.

I do make a concerted effort to add nothing that I'm not going to use. Only "essential" items. I tell myself.

Bill

Yes, and it’s only fair that we should all be able to decide for ourselves what counts as “essential.” 😁

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1 minute ago, Spy Car said:

I'd argue that's true. On the other hand, I keep adding things to an already vast arsenal. LOL.

Is that what's called cognitive dissonance?

Bill

 

I have a fairly vast arsenal myself, but I have also rolled out plenty of pastry with wine bottles and pounded pesto with all manner of household objects. It’s an important stage in one’s culinary development. 😉 

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2 minutes ago, bibiche said:

I have a fairly vast arsenal myself, but I have also rolled out plenty of pastry with wine bottles and pounded pesto with all manner of household objects. It’s an important stage in one’s culinary development. 😉 

Agreed. I have done the same and have grown and developed as a cook by being forced to improvise.

Hence, the cognitive dissonance.

Reminds me I'd better go check on my red sauerkraut.

Bill

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11 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Agreed. I have done the same and have grown and developed as a cook by being forced to improvise.

Hence, the cognitive dissonance.

Reminds me I'd better go check on my red sauerkraut.

Bill

What, Bill! You aren't going to recommend a set of Calaphona pans, a French press, and a grain mill??😁😁😁😁

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Most grocery stores sell kitchen tools and supplies.  The store may only offer one or two brands, but if your daughter discovers she can't live without a larger frying pan, a whisk, an egg timer, or whatever, she can pick one up when she does her grocery shopping.   If the grocery doesn't have what she wants, she (or you) can order it from an online retailer and have it sent to her apartment.

 

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1 minute ago, Sherry in OH said:

she (or you) can order it from an online retailer and have it sent to her apartment.

 

That's what I told her.  She can't have stuff sent to her apartment, but I'm sure there is an Amazon locker close enough.  I should actually check. 

 

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1 hour ago, Faith-manor said:

What, Bill! You aren't going to recommend a set of Calaphona pans, a French press, and a grain mill??😁😁😁😁

The number of items that flashed across my mind was rather vast (and included the last two items) I must admit, but I kept striking things from my mental list.

But I enjoy the challenge of cooking with almost nothing. On occasion.

Bill

 

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I totally agree with paying for grocery delivery and check out which local groceries have the best deli ready to eat options.   Stuff like aluminum foil, parchment, paper plates, etc can be easily added to a grocery order.

I'd try to set her up initially for her breakfast of choice and warming up basic stuff and ship more or add stuff on to a grocery order as needed.  4 weeks will go SO fast.  I can't even tell you what kind of shoe string kitchen stuff my son and his 2 roomies were getting by on this fall.  They've slowly added things as needed all year.  They finally have a colander!  😂

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18 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

 

But I enjoy the challenge of cooking with almost nothing. On occasion.

Bill

 

My solution would always be to just have cereal.  I hate cooking. 

 

17 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Could I add a roll of parchment paper to the aluminium foil request? Or am I pushing it?

Bill

Pushing it.  😛

 

12 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

With one month and no car, it might be nice to have a short-term Instacart Express account or similar that your daughter could use to have groceries delivered.

Bill 

Definitely.  I might just get a longer account since she may need it in college, too.  She won't have a meal plan this year and no car, but at least two of her roommates have cars.  

 

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1 minute ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I totally agree with paying for grocery delivery and check out which local groceries have the best deli ready to eat options.   Stuff like aluminum foil, parchment, paper plates, etc can be easily added to a grocery order.

I'd try to set her up initially for her breakfast of choice and warming up basic stuff and ship more or add stuff on to a grocery order as needed.  4 weeks will go SO fast.  I can't even tell you what kind of shoe string kitchen stuff my son and his 2 roomies were getting by on this fall.  They've slowly added things as needed all year.  They finally have a colander!  😂

I agree and we already told her grocery delivery is available if she wants.  It will be summer in TX and too hot to use public transportation or Uber for perishables, IMO.  And I want us to explore different convenience foods while she's home so she knows what she likes.  

 

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Kassia said:

My solution would always be to just have cereal.  I hate cooking. 

When I first met my future wife--who is a beautiful, intelligent, lovely woman--I discovered she was commonly having cereal for dinner. Broke my heart.

So the first time I had her over to my place I make her homemade raviolis (she's Northern Italian) and she never left. LOL.

Bill

 

 

 

Edited by Spy Car
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Just now, Kassia said:

I agree and we already told her grocery delivery is available if she wants.  It will be summer in TX and too hot to use public transportation or Uber for perishables, IMO.  And I want us to explore different convenience foods while she's home so she knows what she likes.  

 

Awesome!  Grocery delivery was the single best use of funds for our college kid this year!   I think he ate and planned better and it took WAY less time than for him to run around and get stuff.   Not to mention, extra public transit during late covid doesn't sound awesome either.  He now has a small repertoire of things he will cook and gets things like quiche, chicken breasts, soup, rotisserie chicken etc out of the deli.  He does stuff like cereal, bagels, fruit, toast, peanut butter for breakfast.  I bet she'll find a good groove fast for that short period of time.  🙂  

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8 minutes ago, Kassia said:

My solution would always be to just have cereal.  I hate cooking. 

 

Pushing it.  😛

 

Definitely.  I might just get a longer account since she may need it in college, too.  She won't have a meal plan this year and no car, but at least two of her roommates have cars.  

 

Here, Instacart Express is month by month. A good deal if one needs it.

Bill

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5 minutes ago, Kassia said:

I agree and we already told her grocery delivery is available if she wants.  It will be summer in TX and too hot to use public transportation or Uber for perishables, IMO.  And I want us to explore different convenience foods while she's home so she knows what she likes.  

 

It depends upon where she is in TX for how convenient public transportation will be.  But, I am not understanding how the TX heat would make it too hot for Uber for perishapbles? I would think an Uber driver would have the car running with AC which when she was picked up at the store compared to my going grocery shopping and getting into the car that has been sitting in the parking lot in the sun iwth my groceries to drive home.  And, I am not sure how grocery delivery is going to change to be any better.  The perishables still must be transported (some of that is done in refrigerated truck, but not all)

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6 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

When I first met my future wife--who is a beautiful, intelligent, lovely woman--I discovered she was commonly having cereal for dinner. Broke my heart.

So the first time I had her over to my place I make her homemade raviolis (she's Northern Italian) and she never left. LOL.

 

LOL, I would never ever cook if I were single.  Maybe eggs...      

Your raviolis sound amazing!  That's one of the real foods that I love, but I make frozen.

 

3 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Here, Instacart Express is month by month. A good deal if one needs it.

I didn't know that, thanks (never used it).

2 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

It depends upon where she is in TX for how convenient public transportation will be.  But, I am not understanding how the TX heat would make it too hot for Uber for perishapbles? I would think an Uber driver would have the car running with AC which when she was picked up at the store compared to my going grocery shopping and getting into the car that has been sitting in the parking lot in the sun iwth my groceries to drive home.  And, I am not sure how grocery delivery is going to change to be any better.  The perishables still must be transported (some of that is done in refrigerated truck, but not all)

She's near you, Bootsie.  She'll be practically on her college campus and has used the bus there - it goes to Walmart and I think Target.  

I've never used Uber before, so I don't know how it works.  I was thinking the driver would take her to the store and then she'd have to order another Uber to take her back to the apartment after checkout. I guess she could wait in the store with her groceries until the driver arrived?  

 

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7 minutes ago, Kassia said:

LOL, I would never ever cook if I were single.  Maybe eggs...      

Your raviolis sound amazing!  That's one of the real foods that I love, but I make frozen.

 

I didn't know that, thanks (never used it).

She's near you, Bootsie.  She'll be practically on her college campus and has used the bus there - it goes to Walmart and I think Target.  

I've never used Uber before, so I don't know how it works.  I was thinking the driver would take her to the store and then she'd have to order another Uber to take her back to the apartment after checkout. I guess she could wait in the store with her groceries until the driver arrived?  

 

Generally, there will not be a long wait for an Uber, and she should be able to schedule ahead of time or near the time she is ready to check out to arrive when she needs it.  

The Tom Thumb grocery chain near me has been doing first delivery free and other discounts during COVID

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6 minutes ago, Kassia said:

LOL, I would never ever cook if I were single.  Maybe eggs...      

Your raviolis sound amazing!  That's one of the real foods that I love, but I make frozen

Lately my wife has been ordering frozen ones from a brand called Rana. I must admit that they are quite good.

I'm just glad these were not around when i met my future wife, as my life might have turned out very differently. LOL.

As to Instacart, I'm pretty sure you can order deliveries w/o and "Express" account, and that you just pay a higher delivery fee. With Express ($10 a month IMS) the delivery charge is small ($3?) plus tips

You could run the math to see which makes sense.

Bill

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

 

I'm just glad these were not around when i met my future wife, as my life might have turned out very differently. LOL.

As to Instacart, I'm pretty sure you can order deliveries w/o and "Express" account, and that you just pay a higher delivery fee. With Express ($10 a month IMS) the delivery charge is small ($3?) plus tips

 

 

What do you recommend for tipping?  Would you do a percentage or a flat fee?  I imagine that her orders would be pretty small. 

Yes, your life could have been so different if the frozen raviolis had been around at that time!  

 

@Bootsie I hadn't thought of promos for free delivery for first order.  That would be nice!  

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