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Ohio offering financial incentive including full ride scholarship for vaccination; also ending most health orders June 2nd


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23 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

Just to answer my own question, AARP is saying 83% of age 65+ are vaccinated nationally, which means this is below average. 

I don't know where the AARP is getting their number. NPR is saying it is 71.9% nationwide of 65 & olders.

Chart way down the page: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/01/28/960901166/how-is-the-covid-19-vaccination-campaign-going-in-your-state

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Posted (edited)

This thread inspired me to look up my local vaccination rates. These numbers are from April:

“Nearly 80% of all people i65 or older are fully vaccinated, the highest percentage in the state, according to county health data. In addition, 99% of those 75 or older and 90% of people 65 to 74  have received at least one shot.”


Since these numbers were published, a lot of the mass vaccination sites have become walk-up and now they’re open to some younger kids.  It was The Hunger Games trying to get appointments in March. I can’t even wrap my brain around large populations being so hesitant after going through all that. 
 

Can’t they do some “Get vaccinated like Trump” campaign or something in places where people are hesitant?

Edited by KungFuPanda
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11 hours ago, Faith-manor said:

I happily directed a young man at the Shell station to where he could get it. He apparently doesn't watch the news and had not seen online that it is free. He does not get health insurance with his job and assumed he couldn't afford it. When I told him that it was free at the pharmacy two blocks away and they do walk ins until 7 pm, he said he wished it wasn't a pandemic and he could shake my hand. Poor guy. No idea. I know it is out there somewhere in social media, but if the young folks are not connected to the right groups on social media, they probably aren't seeing the message. I wish it was on billboards in our area. He just didn't know, and that is really sad because he works an essential job and wanted it. I am glad we had that brief conversation outside my car while pumping gas.

This just makes me tear up. I hate how much it's taken for granted that we'll all see/learn/hear things through social media. And, in the early days of trying to secure vaccine appointments, that is EXACTLY where I learned when/where/how to get appointments for all the people I was assisting. People very much like this young man - who just didn't have the right social media connections, or know where to look for this information - people who wanted to get vaccinated, but just don't know how! 😕 I don't know how to fix the problem, but it makes me sad to hear that people are sort of information stranded for sheer lack of know how. I'm so glad you were able to point him in the right direction to get the vaccine!

1 hour ago, KungFuPanda said:

It was The Hunger Games trying to get appointments in March. I can’t even wrap my brain around large populations being so hesitant after going through all that. 
Can’t they do some “Get vaccinated like Trump” campaign or something in places where people are hesitant?

Boy, wasn't it, though?! I spent hours upon hours refreshing the computer over and over for days and days trying to get appointments secured for older (and, later, vulnerable) family members, neighbors, and friends.

We know a lot of people who didn't get vaccinated because it was all "too much" to keep up with. Now that there's a vaccine on pretty much every corner, though, those same people are still lazy about it. They're not particularly "against" getting the vaccine... they just can't be bothered. These are people who've pretty much been living life as normal for the past year, so I guess the vaccine didn't carry the promise of "freedom" like it did for me, yk?

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9 hours ago, JennyD said:

I am all in favor of states and localities trying different strategies. Will be very interested to see how this one works out.

 

We don't have cash incentives in the UK. GPs in some areas are calling up people who haven't taken up their appointments to listen to their concerns.  Sympathy and gentle information seems to work well, but there isn't the political aspect to refusal here.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-56253139

So far overall take up in eligible groups is over 90 percent. 

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I think up take will increase once a regular doctor can offer it at a normal appointment.  Your own doctor recommending it and offering it right there on the spot will work with some people.  I can see it swaying my parents who are adamantly against getting it right now.

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18 minutes ago, HeartString said:

I think up take will increase once a regular doctor can offer it at a normal appointment.  Your own doctor recommending it and offering it right there on the spot will work with some people.  I can see it swaying my parents who are adamantly against getting it right now.

Agreed. I'd much rather have the vaccine at the doctor than elsewhere. That's where I ended up getting mine and where my parents got theirs and it gives a feeling of security.

 

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48 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

Agreed. I'd much rather have the vaccine at the doctor than elsewhere. That's where I ended up getting mine and where my parents got theirs and it gives a feeling of security.

 

I had mine from a recently-retired GP in a town hall vaccination centre.  A wide variety of people have been used for the vaccinations, and I was pleased to be assigned a doctor.

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9 hours ago, KungFuPanda said:

 

Can’t they do some “Get vaccinated like Trump” campaign or something in places where people are hesitant?

Right! Given that the biggest indication of being against the vaccine is being a Trump supporter, you'd think having him vaccinated would help! Do they not know he was vaccinated, I wonder?

1 hour ago, HeartString said:

I think up take will increase once a regular doctor can offer it at a normal appointment.  Your own doctor recommending it and offering it right there on the spot will work with some people.  I can see it swaying my parents who are adamantly against getting it right now.

See, for me I think it would be having the places like Publix, Walmart, etc be no appointment needed, like flu shots. So you can be picking up your prescription, be offered it right then, and get a coupon off your groceries. 

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20 hours ago, Faith-manor said:

 

I happily directed a young man at the Shell station to where he could get it. He apparently doesn't watch the news and had not seen online that it is free. He does not get health insurance with his job and assumed he couldn't afford it. When I told him that it was free at the pharmacy two blocks away and they do walk ins until 7 pm, he said he wished it wasn't a pandemic and he could shake my hand. Poor guy. No idea. I know it is out there somewhere in social media, but if the young folks are not connected to the right groups on social media, they probably aren't seeing the message. I wish it was on billboards in our area. He just didn't know, and that is really sad because he works an essential job and wanted it. I am glad we had that brief conversation outside my car while pumping gas.

That was so nice of you. I don’t understand why there aren’t public health messages about the vaccine on every media outlet, Facebook, youtube, billboard, side of a bus, wherever, all the time, making sure every single person knows that these are free and where you can get them. I think most people know but aren’t interested or don’t want to make the effort, but it still needs to be out there.

I read about some money being designated for some sort of campaign, but it’s a little late to be just starting on it. 

29 minutes ago, ktgrok said:


 

See, for me I think it would be having the places like Publix, Walmart, etc be no appointment needed, like flu shots. So you can be picking up your prescription, be offered it right then, and get a coupon off your groceries. 

Yes! 

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Posted (edited)

I don't have really strong feelings about this.  Governor was about to be stripped of powers to make/enforce health orders, so he looked for another way to influence behavior.  I'm sure some people will get very philosophical about the pros and cons, but I have a sick kid and too much work right now.

Regardless of whether a lottery type incentive is appropriate, I really don't think it needed to be $1M each.  I think the majority of that money could have been better spent elsewhere, but nobody asked me.

As for the mask orders, I still don't think they were done right, and cases did nothing but increase after he created that mandate.  (And don't even get me started about the curfew.)  I am sure the mask mandates made some people feel better psychologically, made some people isolate more than they otherwise would, made some people talk and sing less than they would.  I will be very glad to move from irrational mask requirements to potentially rational decision-making, which can include masks depending on the situation.  I'm also sure he will clamp down again if cases go up much.

Edited by SKL
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40 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Right! Given that the biggest indication of being against the vaccine is being a Trump supporter, you'd think having him vaccinated would help! Do they not know he was vaccinated, I wonder?

See, for me I think it would be having the places like Publix, Walmart, etc be no appointment needed, like flu shots. So you can be picking up your prescription, be offered it right then, and get a coupon off your groceries. 

No appointments are necessary at many of the sites in my area.  Last week when I was at the local Walmart Supercenter, there were annoyingly frequent announcements that customers could just walk over to the pharmacy for free COVID vaccines.   

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57 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Right! Given that the biggest indication of being against the vaccine is being a Trump supporter, you'd think having him vaccinated would help! Do they not know he was vaccinated, I wonder?

I'm vaccine hesitant and I am most definitely not a Trump supporter.

These MAGA/Trump/evangelical/idiot assumptions are talking right past people like me.

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11 minutes ago, Hyacinth said:

I'm vaccine hesitant and I am most definitely not a Trump supporter.

These MAGA/Trump/evangelical/idiot assumptions are talking right past people like me.

It makes sense to target messaging towards the largest groups.  The largest group of vaccine hesitant people are Trump supporters.  

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4 minutes ago, HeartString said:

It makes sense to target messaging towards the largest groups.  The largest group of vaccine hesitant people are Trump supporters.  

Sure. I guess I'm just not sure that the two are as closely related as is being suggested. I mean, Trump started Operation Warp Speed. As has been stated, Trump got vaccinated himself. Trump supporters know and love people who have been impacted by COVID just as any other demographic has. Maybe there's a different reason beyond "Trump good / vaccine bad."

 

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3 minutes ago, Hyacinth said:

Sure. I guess I'm just not sure that the two are as closely related as is being suggested. I mean, Trump started Operation Warp Speed. As has been stated, Trump got vaccinated himself. Trump supporters know and love people who have been impacted by COVID just as any other demographic has. Maybe there's a different reason beyond "Trump good / vaccine bad."

 

Plus it alienates those of us Trump supporters who are already vaccinated.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ktgrok said:

Right! Given that the biggest indication of being against the vaccine is being a Trump supporter, you'd think having him vaccinated would help! Do they not know he was vaccinated, I wonder?

See, for me I think it would be having the places like Publix, Walmart, etc be no appointment needed, like flu shots. So you can be picking up your prescription, be offered it right then, and get a coupon off your groceries. 

Around here the some claim he was tackled by secret service and given it against his will because he would never take it willingly! I give up. Sigh. But, he doesn't exactly advertise it or promote it either, nor does Melania.

Edited by Faith-manor
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In my metropolitan county the percentage of people vaccinated is very much tied to socioeconomic status. North of me (a richer area 81 % of eligible people are vaccinated. South of me (including my area) where people aren’t as well off its 61 %. 
 

But you also see a city vs rural divide. Rural counties have less (though I can’t remember the percentages off the top of my head). Some of that might be political but some is still socioeconomic. 

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, HeartString said:

It makes sense to target messaging towards the largest groups.  The largest group of vaccine hesitant people are Trump supporters.  

I am not sure about that. It depends on the area, probably.

10 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

In my metropolitan county the percentage of people vaccinated is very much tied to socioeconomic status. North of me (a richer area 81 % of eligible people are vaccinated. South of me (including my area) where people aren’t as well off its 61 %. 
 

But you also see a city vs rural divide. Rural counties have less (though I can’t remember the percentages off the top of my head). Some of that might be political but some is still socioeconomic. 

Yes, I think this seems about right to me.

But regardless, I don’t think this idea or messaging of “if only these stupid white evangelical MAGA/QAnon/whatever people would get it, everything would be better” is helping. Saying they are idiots and don’t care about anyone else is not going to help either. There are also large numbers of people of color in some communities who are hesitant. Think about trying to persuade those people in the same way as “white evangelicals” are talked about, and how that would sound. 🙁
It doesn’t really matter what the reasons are in one group or the other, and the reasons are not monolithic; nothing is that simple. Listening and being empathetic about that while sharing honest information goes a long way.

Edited by Penelope
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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

In my metropolitan county the percentage of people vaccinated is very much tied to socioeconomic status. North of me (a richer area 81 % of eligible people are vaccinated. South of me (including my area) where people aren’t as well off its 61 %. 
 

It is here too, plus there are ethnic differences too.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55274833

image.png.d0e8bf27425f52f1559393e8b87c6543.png

image.png.1464b8e36e0331c333a25ee15eabddb0.png

 

 

 

Edited by Laura Corin
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1 minute ago, Penelope said:

I am not sure about that. It depends on the area, probably.

Yes, I think this seems about right to me.

But regardless, I don’t think this idea or messaging of “if only these stupid white evangelical MAGA/QAnon/whatever people would get it, everything would be better” is helping. Saying they are idiots and don’t care about anyone else is not going to help either. There are also large numbers of people of color in some communities who are hesitant. Think about trying to persuade those people in the same way as “white evangelicals” are talked about, and it doesn’t go over so well. It doesn’t really matter what the reasons are in one group or the other, and the reasons are not monolithic; nothing is that simple. Listening and being empathetic about that while sharing honest information goes a long way.

It’s just like all advertising, you need different messages for different people. One group will be swayed by Fox and Friends talking about being vaccinated(which happened last week.  One by local ministers.  One group by personal stories. One by their own doctors.  We need an all of the above approach.  

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, HeartString said:

It’s just like all advertising, you need different messages for different people. One group will be swayed by Fox and Friends talking about being vaccinated(which happened last week.  One by local ministers.  One group by personal stories. One by their own doctors.  We need an all of the above approach.  

Would you be swayed to change your opinion by talk about those "stupid <Something you support> people who aren't getting with the program"?

 

Edited by vonfirmath
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53 minutes ago, Hyacinth said:

I'm vaccine hesitant and I am most definitely not a Trump supporter.

These MAGA/Trump/evangelical/idiot assumptions are talking right past people like me.

No one said all people who were vaccine hesitant are. But we have data showing that there is definitely a strong correlation. Tailoring the message makes sense. 

11 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

Would you be swayed to change your opinion by talk about those "stupid <Something you support> people who aren't getting with the program"?

 

Well no, that would be about the worst advertisement ever. But looking at who is not vaccinated, and trying to find incentives that fit them, or finding spokespeople they look up to to get the message across does seem wise. 

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

Would you be swayed to change your opinion by talk about those "stupid <Something you support> people who aren't getting with the program"?

 

I’m sure some ppl are saying that out of frustration but I think that’s different than saying there should be messaging tailored to hesitant people who hold being Republican or being MAGA nation as a large part of their identity.  No one on this board is in charge of public health messaging as far as I know. 
 

I occasionally say other drivers are idiots.  Thst doesn’t affect the safety messaging of the people who do that.   I’m not moved by sports figures advertising sneakers, but someone is. 

Edited by HeartString
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21 hours ago, vonfirmath said:

Which just isn't fair for those who are vaccinated. It's not fair in school to punish the whole class for one kids' misbehavior and its not fair in the population.

 

While the governor of Oregon also lifted mask mandates for the vaccinated, so they did get something extra. But since there’s no way to tell who is vaccinated or not, I’m just assuming most who don’t plan to get vaccinated will also not wear a mask. I’m not sure I see it the same way as you, since I’m guessing that those who chose to be vaccinated are generally the same group who wants high vaccination rates. At this point, I don’t feel personally punished by her plan, I just hope the incentive works. 

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3 hours ago, HeartString said:

I think up take will increase once a regular doctor can offer it at a normal appointment.  Your own doctor recommending it and offering it right there on the spot will work with some people.  I can see it swaying my parents who are adamantly against getting it right now.

Maybe for a moderate group, which is all you can aim for anyway I suppose. 

We have had vaccines at doctor's offices since early April.

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As someone with 6 parents who all adore Trump I really can't see them as a group.

One has a doctorate and understands safety data fine. She does not believe that the vaccine is unsafe. Her husband chose to get it only to make travel easier. She is stubborn and ticked off for how overreaching the gov't was and the businesses it destroyed etc. She knows her chances of dying from it are very very small and I don't think much will change her mind. 

One set of parents are simply misinformed. They have no real education in analyzing the constant lies they are fed. The step mom is more open to learning but just got too much exposure to a ex sister in law who is a front line health care worker but also susceptible to conspiracies by nature. They want to make sure things are safe first. Out of all of them, I'd think there is the most possibility of changing step moms mind but with real info not gimmicks. Dad will just follow along with what she says for health stuff.

 

In laws are deep in Q-Anon quackery. It feels like there is no hope for them. They run on pure adrenaline and anger. 

Trump voters are not one big group just as Biden voters are not one big group.

I do wish our nation could become less tribal.

 

 

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4 hours ago, HeartString said:

I think up take will increase once a regular doctor can offer it at a normal appointment.  Your own doctor recommending it and offering it right there on the spot will work with some people.  I can see it swaying my parents who are adamantly against getting it right now.

I would have much preferred getting the vaccine through my doctor's office that has access to my medical history, especially given that I have had a severe allergic reaction that place me in the "caution" group.   That wasn't a possibility where I am several months ago.  I did get vaccinated at a pop-up clinic, but I knew a lot about the setting of the clinic-who was running it and the emergency precautions that were being taken.  I would not have been comfortable getting the vaccine in the setting in which DH did (a CVS in a small town with no hospital, no waiting area to check for reactions, etc.).

If I were having to make a decision of whether to vaccinate a child (which thankfully I am not in that position as my children are older), I do not think I would vaccinate without a discussion with their trusted pediatrician.

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9 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

I would have much preferred getting the vaccine through my doctor's office that has access to my medical history, especially given that I have had a severe allergic reaction that place me in the "caution" group.   That wasn't a possibility where I am several months ago.  I did get vaccinated at a pop-up clinic, but I knew a lot about the setting of the clinic-who was running it and the emergency precautions that were being taken.  I would not have been comfortable getting the vaccine in the setting in which DH did (a CVS in a small town with no hospital, no waiting area to check for reactions, etc.).

If I were having to make a decision of whether to vaccinate a child (which thankfully I am not in that position as my children are older), I do not think I would vaccinate without a discussion with their trusted pediatrician.

I was able to get vaccinated through my doctor's office (technically down the hall).  But they had access to my records and I felt that they were best equipped to help me if I had a medical emergency.  (I am immunocompromised and have gone through vaccine trials in the past to make sure that I wouldn't have a reaction so I knew that they had good protocol in place.) 

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29 minutes ago, frogger said:

As someone with 6 parents who all adore Trump I really can't see them as a group.

One has a doctorate and understands safety data fine. She does not believe that the vaccine is unsafe. Her husband chose to get it only to make travel easier. She is stubborn and ticked off for how overreaching the gov't was and the businesses it destroyed etc. She knows her chances of dying from it are very very small and I don't think much will change her mind. 

One set of parents are simply misinformed. They have no real education in analyzing the constant lies they are fed. The step mom is more open to learning but just got too much exposure to a ex sister in law who is a front line health care worker but also susceptible to conspiracies by nature. They want to make sure things are safe first. Out of all of them, I'd think there is the most possibility of changing step moms mind but with real info not gimmicks. Dad will just follow along with what she says for health stuff.

 

In laws are deep in Q-Anon quackery. It feels like there is no hope for them. They run on pure adrenaline and anger. 

Trump voters are not one big group just as Biden voters are not one big group.

I do wish our nation could become less tribal.

My conservative family is very mixed also on mask/vax.  None are Q-anon as far as I know.  Many are vaccinated - including some who were among the first takers.  Some are declining because they believe that for them, personally, the vax is more risky (and they may be objectively right).  Some are anti because they are extremely offended by the government overreach.  Some have had Covid (mild cases only).  Of those, some went on to get vaxed, and others, not so far.  As hard as it may be to believe, people are individuals with their own reasons for doing or not doing things.

I've also seen liberal groups that have mixed vax uptake.  Most of them are in the "too early" camp, but some have said they don't trust the vax because Trump pushed it into existence.

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I am not necessarily opposed to providing incentives for vaccinations.  I don't understand, however, the incentive of a chance at a college scholarship for the 12-17 year old group.  Who is making the decision regarding vaccination for this group, the parent or the child?  College is not the best path, best choice, for all young people; using this as the carrot seems to me to encourage the idea that EVERYONE should go to college.  

Personally, I would prefer a lower, broader incentive to everyone who chooses to vaccinate (gift card, zoo tickets, t-shirt, etc.)  Then those who are just not taking the time to get around to vaccinate would do so.  I would prefer it not to be something that someone has a chance for a life-changing outcome.  There are some people who, based on their particular medical situation, should not be vaccinated.  I would not like for someone in that situation to take a risk of being vaccinated because the payout is so high if they are the winner.  

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I think for young healthy people they are actually providing a service to society versus protecting their own health. Well, some of both are involved but it certainly isn't entirely for the person being vaccinated. Because the person benefitting is not the person consuming most economists (I would think) would agree that their are externalities involved and providing subsidies to make up for those externalities makes sense. 

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50 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

 

Personally, I would prefer a lower, broader incentive to everyone who chooses to vaccinate (gift card, zoo tickets, t-shirt, etc.)  Then those who are just not taking the time to get around to vaccinate would do so.  I would prefer it not to be something that someone has a chance for a life-changing outcome.  There are some people who, based on their particular medical situation, should not be vaccinated.  I would not like for someone in that situation to take a risk of being vaccinated because the payout is so high if they are the winner.  

My two sons who received their first shots last night each got a free t-shirt!  I was jealous, I didn't get a t-shirt!  This week I have seen a bakery offering a free donut to those who come get the vaccine in a mobile unit in the parking lot and an ice cream store offering free cones for the same at their lot.  If that had been going on earlier I definitely would have picked one or the other instead of just getting a shot 🤣

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3 hours ago, Sherry in OH said:

No appointments are necessary at many of the sites in my area.  Last week when I was at the local Walmart Supercenter, there were annoyingly frequent announcements that customers could just walk over to the pharmacy for free COVID vaccines.   

There are walk-up appointments at my mall, so access is getting easier and easier.

3 hours ago, Hyacinth said:

I'm vaccine hesitant and I am most definitely not a Trump supporter.

These MAGA/Trump/evangelical/idiot assumptions are talking right past people like me.

There is probably a whole group of people who are hesitant for medical reasons.  I'm assuming they spoke to their own doctors and, due to their particular health concerns, they've been advised to wait, or skip, the vaccine.  As far as I know, nobody has any issues with this group.  They are a known quantity and need to be protected by herd immunity.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, vonfirmath said:

Plus it alienates those of us Trump supporters who are already vaccinated.

 

I worry about this issue. I feel like the more people make a point of Trump supporters being the most hesitant group, the more people in that group will dig into being anti-vax, because that’s their group identity and whatever identities them as such is what they want to project. If they were hearing that Trump supporters are the most eager group to get vaccinated and liberals were hesitant because of Trump’s involvement of Operation Warp Speed, I would expect a large proportion of the Trump-supporting reluctant vaxers would have raced to get vaccinated. 

3 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

It is here too, plus there are ethnic differences too.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55274833

image.png.d0e8bf27425f52f1559393e8b87c6543.png

image.png.1464b8e36e0331c333a25ee15eabddb0.png

 

 

 

That’s interesting. The racial differences are very different in the places I’ve looked at them in the US. Asian groups have had the highest uptake (ours doesn’t separate South Asian vs East Asian), with many places as high as 30% higher uptake among Asians than among whites. Your rates are much higher for whites there than here (although they are high among elderly whites here as well, regardless of political affiliation). 

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I think in general, having vaccine pop up clinics at churches on a Sunday would be helpful. Not just evangelical, but in general. You just listened to a sermon about doing "for the least of these" if the pastor knows what he's doing, and then you walk out and there are people ready and waiting to vaccinate you. 

This could work well in Catholic parishes, in Evangelical churches, in historically Black churches, etc. It's a place where people gather and a time they are hopefully feeling charitable. Give out "Vaccinated for Jesus" stickers or buttons or something - I'd wear one, lol. 

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, KSera said:

 

That’s interesting. The racial differences are very different in the places I’ve looked at them in the US. Asian groups have had the highest uptake (ours doesn’t separate South Asian vs East Asian), with many places as high as 30% higher uptake among Asians than among whites. Your rates are much higher for whites there than here (although they are high among elderly whites here as well, regardless of political affiliation). 

The Asian population of the UK is about 7.5 percent, of whom over five percent are of Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi origin. Chinese origin is less than 1 percent. Other Asian ethnicities are smaller. People of Pakistani and Bangladeshi origin are quite likely to live in 'persistent poverty', so there is a big crossover between ethnicity and deprivation. 

Edited by Laura Corin
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21 hours ago, PeterPan said:

How does this compare to a national average? I haven't seen stats, but I just naively assumed that group would be higher.

Just to answer my own question, AARP is saying 83% of age 65+ are vaccinated nationally, which means this is below average. 

I found this:

As of May 12, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 84.0% of adults 65 and older have gotten at least their first dose and 71.9% have been fully vaccinated.

So my county reporting 73.6% fully vaccinated would be a bit above the national average.

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Talladega Speedway is having a vaccine clinic and offering all people who drive a drive on the speedway.  DH and I already are fully vaccinated and we aren't  wuto racing fans but he thinks that is a great incentive and wishes he could just get another vaccine.

 

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20 hours ago, KungFuPanda said:

This thread inspired me to look up my local vaccination rates. These numbers are from April:

“Nearly 80% of all people i65 or older are fully vaccinated, the highest percentage in the state, according to county health data. In addition, 99% of those 75 or older and 90% of people 65 to 74  have received at least one shot.”


Since these numbers were published, a lot of the mass vaccination sites have become walk-up and now they’re open to some younger kids.  It was The Hunger Games trying to get appointments in March. I can’t even wrap my brain around large populations being so hesitant after going through all that. 
 

Can’t they do some “Get vaccinated like Trump” campaign or something in places where people are hesitant?

Well most of the unvaccinated are not Trump fans

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9 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

In my metropolitan county the percentage of people vaccinated is very much tied to socioeconomic status. North of me (a richer area 81 % of eligible people are vaccinated. South of me (including my area) where people aren’t as well off its 61 %. 
 

But you also see a city vs rural divide. Rural counties have less (though I can’t remember the percentages off the top of my head). Some of that might be political but some is still socioeconomic. 

Some of it may be logistical too. The MRNA vaccines need special freezing that may not be available in rural areas.

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21 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

Wrong

I'd love to see reporting to the contrary.  There is plenty showing that COVID vaccine hesitancy is strongly correlated with being republican.

 

https://thehill.com/homenews/sunday-talk-shows/544206-arkansas-gov-vaccine-hesitance-among-trump-voters-is-natural

program, Bash noted that half of Trump supporters have said they do not plan on getting a coronavirus vaccine.

 

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/why-41-percent-of-republicans-dont-plan-to-get-the-covid-vaccine

https://www.businessinsider.com/white-republicans-more-likely-to-reject-covid-19-vaccine-2021-3

https://news.northeastern.edu/2020/09/15/trust-in-covid-19-vaccines-aligns-with-political-parties-new-national-study-finds/

 

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33 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

Well most of the unvaccinated are not Trump fans

I don't know what the breakdown is.  A lot of people who aren't vaccinated are children and the percentage of the population that is under age varies from place to place, so that's going to shift the vaccine rates quite a bit.  I know there are marginalized communities that have legitimate historic mistrust of the medical system and there are targeted campaigns in place to reach them and get them on board.  There are also people who just don't have internet access or transportation, so their efforts to reach those groups too.  As far as I know, there isn't really an equivalent for the vaccine hesitant red state crowd.  Even if they're not the largest group, they are statistically significant, clustered together, and an effort needs to be made.  

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23 hours ago, kbutton said:

People from church were predictably complaining on social media about this being manipulation. 

They’ve now upped their opinion to “it’s like the Hunger Games.”

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49 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

Wrong

NPR/PBS/MaristPoll on vaccine refusal:
Trump supporters: 47%
Biden supporters: 10%

Civiqs poll: "56% of white Republicans said they were either unsure or would not take a COVID-19 vaccine if it were available to them, compared to 31% of Black Americans, 30% of Latinx Americans, and just 7% of white Democrats."

CNN poll: "Republicans remain the group most likely to say that they will not try to get a vaccine. Almost half of Republicans, 44%, feel that way, compared with 28% of independents and 8% of Democrats."

Monmouth poll: "Partisanship remains the main distinguishing factor among those who want to avoid the vaccine altogether, with 43% of Republicans versus just 5% of Democrats saying this."

Quinnipiac poll: "Republicans show the most hesitancy out of all listed groups toward getting a COVID-19 vaccine with 45 percent saying they do not plan to receive one"

Sources: hereherehere, here, and here

 

 

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3 hours ago, Corraleno said:

NPR/PBS/MaristPoll on vaccine refusal:
Trump supporters: 47%
Biden supporters: 10%

Civiqs poll: "56% of white Republicans said they were either unsure or would not take a COVID-19 vaccine if it were available to them, compared to 31% of Black Americans, 30% of Latinx Americans, and just 7% of white Democrats."

CNN poll: "Republicans remain the group most likely to say that they will not try to get a vaccine. Almost half of Republicans, 44%, feel that way, compared with 28% of independents and 8% of Democrats."

Monmouth poll: "Partisanship remains the main distinguishing factor among those who want to avoid the vaccine altogether, with 43% of Republicans versus just 5% of Democrats saying this."

Quinnipiac poll: "Republicans show the most hesitancy out of all listed groups toward getting a COVID-19 vaccine with 45 percent saying they do not plan to receive one"

Sources: hereherehere, here, and here

 

 

 I know these statistics have been pretty true all along, but I still worry that repeating them just makes the hesitant Republicans even more so, because their decision is already primarily political, and this just reinforces that (not saying you shouldn’t share them, just sharing how I anticipate people responding to them). 

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