Jump to content

Menu

Question about Covid transmission via our eyes


Recommended Posts

I have known for quite some time that Covid can be contracted by getting the virus in our eyes — not just from touching our eyes, but also from particles floating in the air, but does anyone know how common that is? 

I just read this today, and it mentions the eyes, but once again, doesn’t specify whether or not this is a likely way to become infected with the virus. I had originally heard that it was rare, but I’m wondering if anyone has more information about it. I’m particularly interested in the aerosol aspect, as it’s easy to avoid touching our eyes, but not so easy to avoid the air, unless we wear goggles all the time when we are out and about.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/07/health/cdc-coronavirus-transmission/index.html

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Catwoman said:

I have known for quite some time that Covid can be contracted by getting the virus in our eyes — not just from touching our eyes, but also from particles floating in the air, but does anyone know how common that is? 

I just read this today, and it mentions the eyes, but once again, doesn’t specify whether or not this is a likely way to become infected with the virus. I had originally heard that it was rare, but I’m wondering if anyone has more information about it. I’m particularly interested in the aerosol aspect, as it’s easy to avoid touching our eyes, but not so easy to avoid the air, unless we wear goggles all the time when we are out and about.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/07/health/cdc-coronavirus-transmission/index.html

I remember an interview of Dr Fauci that said if you’re high risk or working in an ICU you should wear eye protection. But I’ve never seen a study on it.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There was an article awhile back about people who wear glasses being like 35% less likely to contract covid, which makes me think it's not all that uncommon.  I'm sure glasses are less effective than goggles.  

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am paranoid about transmission through eyes, so I have become one of "those" people. You know, the insufferable ones who wear sunglasses indoor thinking they are celebrities.

Pre-COVID, they would be perched on my head. Now, they are firmly a barrier protecting my eyes. I am noticing more and more people doing that. Wearing sunglasses indoor. Unless there is a new fashion trend I am unaware of, I am not alone. DH wears glasses. 

My kids wear sunglasses too the few times they have ventured inside.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

I am paranoid about transmission through eyes, so I have become one of "those" people. You know, the insufferable ones who wear sunglasses indoor thinking they are celebrities.

Koreans and Japanese tend to wear face shields and masks everywhere. They were already wearing mask every flu season preCOVID.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Terabith said:

There was an article awhile back about people who wear glasses being like 35% less likely to contract covid, which makes me think it's not all that uncommon.  I'm sure glasses are less effective than goggles.  

Wow. That seems like a lot. I'd love to see some more on that. Like, one thing I'm aware of is that most people with glasses also tuck their masks under the nose of their glasses so it could also just be that we're getting a better mask fit. But still.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can’t find it now, but I distinctly remember early on in the pandemic a medical person, doctor I think, who got it through her eyes—it was the only possible transmission path given the PPE she was using.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Eye protection is common PPE during Covid among healthcare workers. There are levels of PPE based on your job and what you're likely to encounter, but covering eyes is essential if you're around someone likely to have it. DH had to have eye protection for a while and so did a friend that works in a nursing home, and she didn't even do direct care, generally.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Our hospital standard right now is safety glasses in all clinical areas.  Upgrade to faceshield for interaction with patients on droplet/contact or  aerosol precautions.

I think the mechanism is two-fold: droplets landing on the mucous membranes of the eye, and virus rubbed into the eye when we touch/rub them with less than clean hands.

I wear clear safety glasses when grocery shopping  or any other task in an indoor space with people (they look like sport sunglasses, but with clear lenses).  I look like a dork, but I don't care.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Laurie said:

I have no data/evidence for you.  

But I'll tell you what I do when I get home from my weekly trip to the grocery store.  I wear an N95 mask while I'm shopping, but I still rinse with Listerine mouthwash when I get home.  I also wash my face with Johnson's baby shampoo.  I use this because it's supposed to be gentle on the eyes...and while I'm washing I purposely put some of the lather onto my eyelids and into the corners of my eyes, then I blink a few times to spread it around.  I also wash inside my nostrils and then kind of snort up some water to rinse.  Maybe this is weird and TMI, but there it is...(maybe I should add, "Don't quote; I'll probably delete")

Oh, and I do wear glasses so I clean them with Dawn dish detergent.   

Stop doing that with the baby shampoo.  It can burn your corneas.  I know someone who didn't stop them when one kid poured some baby shampoo over a sibling's head in the tub. Some got in his eyes.  That baby had to be hospitalized.  His vision did return, but the doctors warned that it might not when he was first admitted.  She tried to start some campaign on social media to put a warning on the shampoo bottle that it isn't safe for eyes but found that J&J is an advertiser and every social media company kept removing her campaign.

If you feel the need to flush your eyes (and frankly that sounds OCD to me), get sterile saline solution meant to rinse contact lenses.  That's safe.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I wear goggles to the doctors office, which is still the only thing I do indoors.  Yes, I’m fully vaccinated, no, I do not care how I look.

COVID did a number to me and I’m not interested in picking up *any* virus right now. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Katy Agh! J & J baby shampoo is how my eye doctors told me to treat blepharitis. I haven’t considered the safety of it. I wonder if it’s better that my eyes are closed while washing them with tiny amount versus a direct pour into open eye?

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Acorn said:

@Katy Agh! J & J baby shampoo is how my eye doctors told me to treat blepharitis. I haven’t considered the safety of it. I wonder if it’s better that my eyes are closed while washing them with tiny amount versus a direct pour into open eye?

What you’re doing is fine. I think Katy meant that it’s a bad idea to intentionally get the shampoo in your eyes. 🙂 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Katy said:

Stop doing that with the baby shampoo.  It can burn your corneas.  I know someone who didn't stop them when one kid poured some baby shampoo over a sibling's head in the tub. Some got in his eyes.  That baby had to be hospitalized.  His vision did return, but the doctors warned that it might not when he was first admitted.  She tried to start some campaign on social media to put a warning on the shampoo bottle that it isn't safe for eyes but found that J&J is an advertiser and every social media company kept removing her campaign.

If you feel the need to flush your eyes (and frankly that sounds OCD to me), get sterile saline solution meant to rinse contact lenses.  That's safe.

Thank you for letting me know.   I'm not putting it full-strength into my eyes...I'm adding water/lathering a small amount in my hands and then washing my face, but I will discontinue.    

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Acorn said:

@Katy Agh! J & J baby shampoo is how my eye doctors told me to treat blepharitis. I haven’t considered the safety of it. I wonder if it’s better that my eyes are closed while washing them with tiny amount versus a direct pour into open eye?

Washing your eyelashes & very carefully tear ducts is different than putting it into your eyes.  Just be careful.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...