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The house we just bought has a gas range, which I was excited about, since I have always preferred cooking on a gas stovetop. However, one one of the burners currently lights reliably. I am planning to get a repair person out to look at it, but also trying to think ahead.

Currently, the kitchen is functional but not attractive. The long-term plan is to do a light remodel -- paint the cabinets, add a backsplash, replace countertops and sink/faucet, replace any appliances that prove to be in less-than-good shape once we've had a chance to live with them a bit. Given how much money we are pouring into other, more immediate projects, I would like to hold off on the kitchen remodel for a while and, knowing that the remodel is coming, I would prefer not to invest any significant money into the kitchen until we are ready to do the whole thing.

So . . . with all that said . . .

  • Assuming the current range/stove is fixable for a reasonable cost, I will fix it.
  • If it is not fixable for a reasonable cost, I will probably go ahead and replace it. 
  • If the most cost-effective, least hassle-inducing option is to replace with another gas range (presence or absence of electric hook-ups, etc.), we'll go with that route.

If it turns out I need to replace and there are no structural reasons to go with one or the other, what does the Hive recommend in terms of deciding gas vs. electric?

As I said, my personal preference for cooking is gas. However, I heard a lengthy report on the radio the other day discussing the negative environmental impacts of gas stovetops. Apparently, some municipalities are banning them in new construction. So, from an ethical standpoint I don't want to contribute to global climate change, and from a practical standpoint I don't want to intentionally purchase an expensive appliance that I know is on its way to becoming a dinosaur. 

Knowing that this may be the first domino to fall and push us into doing the remodel sooner rather than later, I also really want to get this decision right.

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21 minutes ago, Jenny in Florida said:

The house we just bought has a gas range, which I was excited about, since I have always preferred cooking on a gas stovetop. However, one one of the burners currently lights reliably. I am planning to get a repair person out to look at it, but also trying to think ahead.

Currently, the kitchen is functional but not attractive. The long-term plan is to do a light remodel -- paint the cabinets, add a backsplash, replace countertops and sink/faucet, replace any appliances that prove to be in less-than-good shape once we've had a chance to live with them a bit. Given how much money we are pouring into other, more immediate projects, I would like to hold off on the kitchen remodel for a while and, knowing that the remodel is coming, I would prefer not to invest any significant money into the kitchen until we are ready to do the whole thing.

So . . . with all that said . . .

  • Assuming the current range/stove is fixable for a reasonable cost, I will fix it.
  • If it is not fixable for a reasonable cost, I will probably go ahead and replace it. 
  • If the most cost-effective, least hassle-inducing option is to replace with another gas range (presence or absence of electric hook-ups, etc.), we'll go with that route.

If it turns out I need to replace and there are no structural reasons to go with one or the other, what does the Hive recommend in terms of deciding gas vs. electric?

As I said, my personal preference for cooking is gas. However, I heard a lengthy report on the radio the other day discussing the negative environmental impacts of gas stovetops. Apparently, some municipalities are banning them in new construction. So, from an ethical standpoint I don't want to contribute to global climate change, and from a practical standpoint I don't want to intentionally purchase an expensive appliance that I know is on its way to becoming a dinosaur. 

Knowing that this may be the first domino to fall and push us into doing the remodel sooner rather than later, I also really want to get this decision right.

Gas, all the way.

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One thing to be aware of is that with a lighter or match gas functions in extended power outages like hurricanes or ice storms. If you get electric or induction you might want a generator as backup.

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16 minutes ago, Jenny in Florida said:

The house we just bought has a gas range, which I was excited about, since I have always preferred cooking on a gas stovetop. However, one one of the burners currently lights reliably. I am planning to get a repair person out to look at it, but also trying to think ahead.

Currently, the kitchen is functional but not attractive. The long-term plan is to do a light remodel -- paint the cabinets, add a backsplash, replace countertops and sink/faucet, replace any appliances that prove to be in less-than-good shape once we've had a chance to live with them a bit. Given how much money we are pouring into other, more immediate projects, I would like to hold off on the kitchen remodel for a while and, knowing that the remodel is coming, I would prefer not to invest any significant money into the kitchen until we are ready to do the whole thing.

So . . . with all that said . . .

  • Assuming the current range/stove is fixable for a reasonable cost, I will fix it.
  • If it is not fixable for a reasonable cost, I will probably go ahead and replace it. 
  • If the most cost-effective, least hassle-inducing option is to replace with another gas range (presence or absence of electric hook-ups, etc.), we'll go with that route.

If it turns out I need to replace and there are no structural reasons to go with one or the other, what does the Hive recommend in terms of deciding gas vs. electric?

As I said, my personal preference for cooking is gas. However, I heard a lengthy report on the radio the other day discussing the negative environmental impacts of gas stovetops. Apparently, some municipalities are banning them in new construction. So, from an ethical standpoint I don't want to contribute to global climate change, and from a practical standpoint I don't want to intentionally purchase an expensive appliance that I know is on its way to becoming a dinosaur. 

Knowing that this may be the first domino to fall and push us into doing the remodel sooner rather than later, I also really want to get this decision right.

I'm going to throw another option into the mix:  Induction.  It's the most energy efficient of any of the options.  It runs off electricity but the heat is produced by magnets that spin under the burner and excite the molecules in the pot itself causing the pot to heat up.  Because of this the heat transfer rate to your food is much higher than standard electricity (even somewhat higher than gas) so less is needed to get the same results.  Add to it that because the pot itself is in essence your burner, there is far less heat that escapes into the air (which means less cooking heat that your air conditioner has to compensate for to keep your house comfortable).  Thirdly, nothing ever burns to the stove top which if you are a messy cook like I am, there is no scrubbing burners or scraping to get burned food off.  I've been using this technology since 2010 (and it's been around much longer than that), there is no way I would consider anything else, I just wish more people knew/understand it because I seriously think it is awesome.

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4 minutes ago, cjzimmer1 said:

I'm going to throw another option into the mix:  Induction.  It's the most energy efficient of any of the options.  It runs off electricity but the heat is produced by magnets that spin under the burner and excite the molecules in the pot itself causing the pot to heat up.  Because of this the heat transfer rate to your food is much higher than standard electricity (even somewhat higher than gas) so less is needed to get the same results.  Add to it that because the pot itself is in essence your burner, there is far less heat that escapes into the air (which means less cooking heat that your air conditioner has to compensate for to keep your house comfortable).  Thirdly, nothing ever burns to the stove top which if you are a messy cook like I am, there is no scrubbing burners or scraping to get burned food off.  I've been using this technology since 2010 (and it's been around much longer than that), there is no way I would consider anything else, I just wish more people knew/understand it because I seriously think it is awesome.

I like my electric range well enough, and have almost no interest in gas. But I'm definitely going to consider induction when it's time to replace the current one.

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Posted (edited)

I love cooking on a gas stove.

If you are concerned about climate change: unless your municipality is sourcing all its power through wind, hydroelectric, or solar, electric is worse. Because it is terribly inefficient to first burn fossil fuels to generate electricity and then convert this electric energy into heat again.

Edited by regentrude
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12 minutes ago, cjzimmer1 said:

I'm going to throw another option into the mix:  Induction.  It's the most energy efficient of any of the options.  It runs off electricity but the heat is produced by magnets that spin under the burner and excite the molecules in the pot itself causing the pot to heat up.  Because of this the heat transfer rate to your food is much higher than standard electricity (even somewhat higher than gas) so less is needed to get the same results.

how does that work in the oven? I find that most of my cooking energy use is through baking.

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I have dual fuel.  I love it.  electric oven, gas range.

if you go for gas, be sure to pay attention to BTU output of burners.  You will also need a higher capacity exterior venting fan.  (if you want a downdraft fan - you need one that will pop up at least 8" - or however much they offer - above the cooking surface.  the fans at the same level will also suck heat off the burner instead of going to what you're cooking.

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5 minutes ago, regentrude said:

I love cooking on a gas stove.

If you are concerned about climate change: unless your municipality is sourcing all its power through wind, hydroelectric, or solar, electric is worse. Because it is terribly inefficient to first burn fossil fuels to generate electricity and then convert this electric energy into heat again.

just from a practicality standpoint, electric is worse.  it takes time to heat up, and time to cool down.  If you need to change the temperature while you're cooking - it's slow to respond.

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26 minutes ago, hjffkj said:

I personally would go with gas. I hate electric cook tops, even though I'm stuck with it at my house since we don't have a gas line in the neighborhood

How do you heat your house?

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Gas not only effects the larger environment. It affects your indoor air quality.

"Yet the EPA’s own science shows that homes with gas stoves have around 50 percent, ranging up to over 400 percent, higher levels of NO2 than homes with electric stoves. Concentrations can often exceed US outdoor pollution standards." David Roberts

"During the hour I was cooking and baking” with a gas stove, he says, NO2 concentrations spiked “close to 200 ppb.” Though concentrations died down afterward, they averaged 140 pub to 150 ppb over the course of the hour, well in excess of the US outdoor NO2 standard of 100 ppb for one-hour exposure." David Lu quoted

https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2020/5/7/21247602/gas-stove-cooking-indoor-air-pollution-health-risks

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1 hour ago, cjzimmer1 said:

I'm going to throw another option into the mix:  Induction.  It's the most energy efficient of any of the options.  It runs off electricity but the heat is produced by magnets that spin under the burner and excite the molecules in the pot itself causing the pot to heat up.  Because of this the heat transfer rate to your food is much higher than standard electricity (even somewhat higher than gas) so less is needed to get the same results.  Add to it that because the pot itself is in essence your burner, there is far less heat that escapes into the air (which means less cooking heat that your air conditioner has to compensate for to keep your house comfortable).  Thirdly, nothing ever burns to the stove top which if you are a messy cook like I am, there is no scrubbing burners or scraping to get burned food off.  I've been using this technology since 2010 (and it's been around much longer than that), there is no way I would consider anything else, I just wish more people knew/understand it because I seriously think it is awesome.

Out of curiosity, does induction cycle on/off, hot/cold? That is my primary objection to electric.

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Posted (edited)
48 minutes ago, Kalmia said:

Gas not only effects the larger environment. It affects your indoor air quality.

I really love cooking on my gas cooktop but it's on its last leg, and we're planning to replace it with electric for exactly this reason. We have people with asthma and environmental illness in the family and it's thus a big priority for us to have a healthy house. But there's no doubt I'll miss cooking with gas.  

Our ridiculous gas oven, on other hand, has never heated well from the top and I can't wait to be able to make properly browned baked goods and roasts without resorting to heroic measures like pan-searing or broiling after baking. 

Edited by Acadie
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Posted (edited)

I had electric for most of my adult life until 1 1/2 years ago.  Personally, I don't notice a great benefit to the gas over electric and it is MUCH more difficult to keep clean.  Glass top electric is super simple to keep clean.  

Then again I am not a gourmet cook....ds20 really likes it.  

Edited to add that it has been nice when power was out a few times and I could still make coffee....boil water and use my camp coffee pot.

Edited by Scarlett
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I feel very unchefy preferring electric, but I do.  I love the actual cooking on a gas flame, but I don't like that whiff of gas smell you get the split second before it ignites. (Dd and I can smell it, Ds and Dh think we're crazy).  I prefer an electric oven, and I like that a flat top stove serves as extra counter space when you're not using the range.  If you have plenty of counter space, aren't a super smeller, and can get dual fuel, then a gas range would be the best for you.  Extended power outages are so rare in my life that I wouldn't own a gas range because of it.  I'd just bust out my camp stove or grill, but our power lines are buried so it almost never happens.  I have gas in my house, and gas heat, but my stove is electric.  

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Thanks, everyone! You've given me lots to chew on. 

I will admit to loving the idea of induction, but it's extremely pricey. And, given that needing to replace the range would likely kick off the broader kitchen remodeling project, I'm having trouble getting comfortable with that cost for a single appliance.

So, it seems like my checklist is now:

  • Can the current cooktop be repaired?
  • If yes, is the repair cost-effective?
  • If no, do I have the (easy/cost-effective) option to choose either electric or gas as a replacement?

Then it just comes down to flipping a coin with my conscience to decide on the way to go.

 

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2 hours ago, cjzimmer1 said:

I'm going to throw another option into the mix:  Induction.  It's the most energy efficient of any of the options.  It runs off electricity but the heat is produced by magnets that spin under the burner and excite the molecules in the pot itself causing the pot to heat up.  Because of this the heat transfer rate to your food is much higher than standard electricity (even somewhat higher than gas) so less is needed to get the same results.  Add to it that because the pot itself is in essence your burner, there is far less heat that escapes into the air (which means less cooking heat that your air conditioner has to compensate for to keep your house comfortable).  Thirdly, nothing ever burns to the stove top which if you are a messy cook like I am, there is no scrubbing burners or scraping to get burned food off.  I've been using this technology since 2010 (and it's been around much longer than that), there is no way I would consider anything else, I just wish more people knew/understand it because I seriously think it is awesome.

Can you speak on how well this works with cast iron?  How about canning, both water and pressure?  I much prefer gas, which is what I have, but I cook a LOT and the health issues with gas have me concerned.  And the oven does not work as well as electric.  So when we go to replace, I'd like to consider other options.  I had a glass top electric way back when and it had many benefits.  The slow-to-heat-and-cool, especially when canning, was a big reason for us to go with gas. 

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I would also second(or third) an induction stove top.   It gets hot so fast and when you turn it off, it’s off.   I had one for a number of years and we just moved to a house with gas and I definitely prefer induction.   As long as your pan is ferromagnetic, it works.   So cast iron works.   Also, because of how induction works, the stove won’t turn on unless there is a pan on that burner.  So no accidentally turning on the stove and melting something or having gas fill your house.  The only time I had a small issue was with a cast iron ebelskiver pan, where the bottom wasn’t flat.  There was kind of a ridge that circled the pan and it kept the pan from touching the stove.   

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We have a newish electric range, and while the oven is fine the sensi-temp elements on the cooktop are awful. It takes at least twice as long to bring a pot of water to boil on it than our old gas range. As soon as the water gets close to boiling the burners sense that the pan is "hot enough" and cycle off. By the time they decide to cycle back on the water has begun to cool off. It also makes cooking rice on the stove top extremely hit or miss since it isn't heated consistently. The rice issue was bad enough we ordered a rice cooker from Japan. Additionally, you can't get the sensors wet which makes soaking, or just thoroughly washing, the elements pretty much impossible. I will never buy another electric range after the headache this one has caused. I would stick with gas or dual-fuel.

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Another vote for induction (in general; I know OP says it won't work for her).

I've been experimenting with a small, countertop induction unit this year while waiting until getting our own small kitchen remodel done. I love it. It's as fast and responsive as gas, while being incredibly easy to clean. Cast iron works great, as long as the pan has a flat bottom. I can wipe up spills immediately, because the unit never gets hot enough to burn a paper towel. After trying this out for a while, there's no way I would go with a different technology. 

2 hours ago, Sneezyone said:

Out of curiosity, does induction cycle on/off, hot/cold? That is my primary objection to electric.

My little Duxtop unit does cycle, at least at the lowest temperature. I don't notice it at higher temperatures (not sure if that's just my faulty observation skills?), so if I don't want it to cycle, I just bump it up a bit. I don't know if full-sized induction units do the same.

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When we bought our house, it had a newish gas stove/oven. I was so excited, because I much prefer to cook on a gas stovetop. For the oven, either is fine. It is harder to clean than a glass-top electric. But I can't use my cast iron on glass-tops without scratching them, and they are the only skillets I have (and want). While I prefer gas, I don't really mind the glass-tops, but they can get scratched so much more easily.

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4 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

Gas. I run indoor air quality meters in the house, and as long as I run my exhaust fan, it’s fine. 

I'm curious about this--what does your meter measure, exactly? And what happens if you turn off the exhaust fan? 

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I vote induction. It can be a difficult switch for those of us used to banging around on gas stoves, but induction is very responsive and worth the investment in time spent adjusting and money. I think of it as an investment in the future. Many, many high end restaurants have switched, at least partially, to induction.

What regentrude mentions about how your electricity is powered is true, but hopefully systems that haven’t already done so will start making the switch to clean energy.

An induction stove is also way cooler (temperature wise) than a gas stove, an important consideration in Florida, I imagine.

And @Jenny in Florida, congratulations on your house purchase!

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Another vote for gas. We’ve had both over the years. When we re-did the kitchen in the current house, we actually had a gas line added just to have the gas stove. So, if you already have the gas line, stick with gas!

 

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What changed the game for me, more than electric or gas, was getting a freestanding range with two ovens.  It has a single shelf oven on top and a regular-sized convection oven on the bottom.  I use them both more than I ever thought I would . . . and I'm not a person who makes cakes or cookies that often. Remodeling to add double ovens would be a huge expense, but I got all of the functionality by just choosing a range with two ovens.  

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21 minutes ago, KungFuPanda said:

What changed the game for me, more than electric or gas, was getting a freestanding range with two ovens.  It has a single shelf oven on top and a regular-sized convection oven on the bottom.  I use them both more than I ever thought I would . . . and I'm not a person who makes cakes or cookies that often. Remodeling to add double ovens would be a huge expense, but I got all of the functionality by just choosing a range with two ovens.  

I loved my double oven slide in range 2 houses back.  I used both ovens a lot too. 

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12 hours ago, regentrude said:

how does that work in the oven? I find that most of my cooking energy use is through baking.

 

4 hours ago, regentrude said:

I asked another poster before but didn't get a reply:  can somebody explain to me how you BAKE?

Sorry for not responding sooner but I had to work out of town today and just got back. I believe this was answered but in case I'm misremembering as I scanned through the thread, the oven is still a standard electric oven.  Only the burners are operated by induction.

I have no idea how to calculate which part of my range uses the most energy but with the oven at least it's contained inside (unless of course one opens the door).  But with the stovetop, a certain portion of it escapes into the air and onto the cook (aka me).  There is an extreme difference between how much heat I feel using a radiant cooktop and how much I feel using induction.  

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11 hours ago, Sneezyone said:

Out of curiosity, does induction cycle on/off, hot/cold? That is my primary objection to electric.

it does cycle (because I hear the clicking) but not in a manner that affects the cooking.  Meaning if you have something on a slow boil, it will continue as a slow boil even as the burner is cycling assuming you leave it set at the same temp.  I can honestly say, I've never had anything affected by the cycling.  And it's amazing to be be able to melt chocolate without a double boiler and without having to worry about it burning either. On the other hand, if you have a rolling boil and you turn down the burner, the boil will stop instantly.  The burners react that fast!  I can't tell you how many near boil overs I have managed to avoid because the response is so fast.   

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, skimomma said:

Can you speak on how well this works with cast iron?  How about canning, both water and pressure?  I much prefer gas, which is what I have, but I cook a LOT and the health issues with gas have me concerned.  And the oven does not work as well as electric.  So when we go to replace, I'd like to consider other options.  I had a glass top electric way back when and it had many benefits.  The slow-to-heat-and-cool, especially when canning, was a big reason for us to go with gas. 

I have this fear that cast iron will scratch my stovetop. I don't know if it will or not just a fear.  So I have a silpat I put on my burner and then put the cast iron pan on that.  And I can say that with that set-up my cast iron works fantastic on induction (and yes it's completely safe to put something between the pan and the glasstop because with induction the glasstop isn't conducting the heat to the pan and thus never gets hot enough to burn.  I will regularly, lift up my pan while cooking to wipe up my boilovers on the burner and then set the pan right back down and keep cooking).

Induction is AMAZING for waterbath canning.  I have never owned gas so I can't compare times but with my old coil stove even when it was brand new, you had to start the waterbath at least an hour in advance of the actual canning to get it to a boil.  On induction I can boil a canning pot of water (for 7 quarts) in 18 minutes.  The glasstop itself never gets hot enough to burn so the only thing that really needs time to cool down is the waterbath itself (unless you don't mind dumping the hot water right away but personally I let it sit).

Pressure canning is the only drawback.  Until recently, the only pressure canner than worked on induction was a model that you could only do 4 quarts at a time.  Recently I have seen the presto is making a bigger one that will work on induction but it seems delayed by some of the materials shortages due to COVID as they have been stuck in "temporarily unavailable" status since the beginning of COVID.

Edited by cjzimmer1
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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Katy said:

One thing to be aware of is that with a lighter or match gas functions in extended power outages like hurricanes or ice storms. If you get electric or induction you might want a generator as backup.

I’ve heard that newer model stoves have a “safety feature” that prevents manual lighting.  
 

Even so, team gas. To the point that an electric range might be a dealbreaker for me. 

Edited by Forget-Me-Not
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22 minutes ago, Forget-Me-Not said:

I’ve heard that newer model stoves have a “safety feature” that prevents manual lighting.  
 

Even so, team gas. To the point that an electric range might be a dealbreaker for me. 

I bought a new one when we moved into this house two years ago.  I've manually lit it many times. We had some weird thing with a breaker on that wall that we needed an electrician to fix.

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1 hour ago, Katy said:

I bought a new one when we moved into this house two years ago.  I've manually lit it many times. We had some weird thing with a breaker on that wall that we needed an electrician to fix.

Oh, huh, maybe just an ugly rumor then! I hope so, as we are hoping to build a house soon 😀

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I have always had gas, and my few experiences with electric have not been good - I hated how slowly the temperature adjusted.  Husband is keen on induction for when we renovate, mostly to make it easier to clean.  As he does most of the kitchen cleaning, that's fine.  I have my fingers crossed that I like induction.

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10 hours ago, cjzimmer1 said:

I have this fear that cast iron will scratch my stovetop. I don't know if it will or not just a fear.  So I have a silpat I put on my burner and then put the cast iron pan on that.  And I can say that with that set-up my cast iron works fantastic on induction (and yes it's completely safe to put something between the pan and the glasstop because with induction the glasstop isn't conducting the heat to the pan and thus never gets hot enough to burn.  I will regularly, lift up my pan while cooking to wipe up my boilovers on the burner and then set the pan right back down and keep cooking).

Induction is AMAZING for waterbath canning.  I have never owned gas so I can't compare times but with my old coil stove even when it was brand new, you had to start the waterbath at least an hour in advance of the actual canning to get it to a boil.  On induction I can boil a canning pot of water (for 7 quarts) in 18 minutes.  The glasstop itself never gets hot enough to burn so the only thing that really needs time to cool down is the waterbath itself (unless you don't mind dumping the hot water right away but personally I let it sit).

Pressure canning is the only drawback.  Until recently, the only pressure canner than worked on induction was a model that you could only do 4 quarts at a time.  Recently I have seen the presto is making a bigger one that will work on induction but it seems delayed by some of the materials shortages due to COVID as they have been stuck in "temporarily unavailable" status since the beginning of COVID.

Thanks!  Bummer on the pressure canning.  I use one of the huge ones from the 1970s that I'd hate to replace.  But I could always use a stand alone burner (outside!) if I ever go this route.  I am intrigued for sure.....and because I am, my gas stove will probably live forever.  

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I love gas and really don't like the electric stove we have now.  You have much more control over cooking/heat with gas.

That said, I've been hearing that gas is much worse for the environment.  (Interestingly, others have said the opposite here so it leaves me wondering!)

Apparently California is considering not even allowing gas in new homes.  

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1 hour ago, J-rap said:

I love gas and really don't like the electric stove we have now.  You have much more control over cooking/heat with gas.

That said, I've been hearing that gas is much worse for the environment.  (Interestingly, others have said the opposite here so it leaves me wondering!)

Apparently California is considering not even allowing gas in new homes.  

Yes, the environmental thing is part of what bothers me. 

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/05/745051104/give-up-your-gas-stove-to-save-the-planet-banning-gas-is-the-next-climate-push

For the moment, it's looking like I will dodge the decision bullet because the current range is likely repairable. And repairing instead of replacing and trashing the old unit is definitely more environmentally responsible. I also did some research and discovered that most of the electricity in my area is generated using natural gas. So, as my husband pointed out, it's done at scale with much better and cleaner processes, but even putting in an electric range doesn't get me away from burning natural gas.

My hope now is that I can keep the current gas range running for long enough to bank the bucks to make purchasing induction a realistic option.

 

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Just an FYI: When we were overseas, and it was going to take a bit to get our gas cylinders, we bought an induction hotplate to tide us over. It was great! I haven't ever used induction for the whole stovetop, but you can get the hotplates on Amazon (though for a lot more than I paid back then). Our boys used it all the time to cook eggs, grilled cheese sandwiches, etc. I only had a couple of pieces of cookware that I could use on it, but now they have mats you can buy to use under regular cookware on them (also available from Amazon).

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16 hours ago, Forget-Me-Not said:

I’ve heard that newer model stoves have a “safety feature” that prevents manual lighting.  
 

NOOOOOO!!!!

I live in a hurricane prone area but outside the evacuation zone. One of the things that makes two weeks without power doable is having a gas range. I do not want to have to fool around with the grill or a camp stove. I hope this is just a rumor.

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Posted (edited)

There's no pilot light to light in new gas ovens, as they have electronic ignition, but you can totally light burners.  My Jenn Air oven is two years old, and I can light it. That's true of Whirlpool and a few other brands I investigated.

 

ETA: the change happened in 1990, so, you know, 31 years ago....

 

 

Edited by prairiewindmomma
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