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Two questions:

1.  Do pretty much all OG (Orthan Gillingham) spelling curriculum teach through spelling rules, like All About Spelling does?   (Maybe not same order or methods, but use spelling rules to teach, and don't rely solely on memorization)?

2.   What are some other OG spelling curriculum (love AAS, but just am curious what other OG spelling curriculum there are). 

 

Edited by goldenecho
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#1 - Yes, all OG inspired curricula I've seen use spelling rules and generalizations as one of the primary teaching tools.  Learning all the phonograms and their sounds would be another thing that all OG inspired curricula use, as far as I know.

#2 - Logic of English is a OG-inspired curricula that I've used with my kids.  Writing Road to Reading and Spell to Write and Read are two that pre-date AAS and LOE.  Barton is one that is suggested for dyslexic and kids and others who struggle with the pace of the typical OG inspired curricula.  Wilson and S.P.I.R.E are OG inspired curricula that are more aimed at the public school market and less at homeschoolers.  I'm sure there are others as well.

O-G at its roots is an approach rather than a specific method or curriculum, so what a trained OG tutor does will look somewhat different than what these curricula do.  A trained tutor (some more than others) will look at the students' needs and use a diagnostic/prescriptive approach to deciding what to cover next, how to teach it, and how long to spend before moving on to the next topic.  Neurotypical or mildly dyslexic kids may not need that, but a kid who is really struggling can benefit from something more than just following the next step in a curriculum progression.   (I took an in-depth OG training, though I am not certified - these are the general principles we were taught that explain the approach:  https://www.ortonacademy.org/resources/og-approach-principles/). 

 

 

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One other thought -- OG inspired programs vary in how many "rule breaking" words students are expected to memorize.  Logic of English has their rules and phonograms modified in such a way as to minimize rule breaking words that must be memorized to as few as possible. Some programs have more, from what I understand.  The training program I went through had a long list of "red words" that we were told to have students memorize (some of them actually ARE phonetic, but use advanced concepts a student might not learn until much later in their tutoring sessions).  From what I hear in the OG communities I'm a part of on facebook, the "Heart Words" approach is now being taught by some OG training programs, which focuses on having students find the part of a rule-breaking word that must be memorized "by heart" but also making sure to help students see that other letters of a rule-breaking word actually do follow typical sounds/patterns.

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My kid finished all 12 levels of Wilson, and her spelling always follows the rules.  However, there are many, many sounds out there that can be spelled in multiple ways, even following the rules, especially long vowel sounds.  My kid almost 100% of the time picks the wrong one.  

I think OG was the best approach for making sure her reading was solid, but Apples and Pears was the only program we ever saw real spelling improvement on.  I'm kinda bummed that sending her to school and prioritizing Wilson tutoring meant we couldn't complete the program.  

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On 5/3/2021 at 12:22 PM, Terabith said:

My kid finished all 12 levels of Wilson, and her spelling always follows the rules.  However, there are many, many sounds out there that can be spelled in multiple ways, even following the rules, especially long vowel sounds.  My kid almost 100% of the time picks the wrong one.  

 

Yeah. It's the worst!

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I really like Apples and Pears as well, particularly for older kids. There's a wry British humor to all the Sound Foundations which seems to work well at getting buy in, when other programs don't. And it's easy to do without a lot of little fiddly bits. 

 

 

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