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What games/apps would you suggest for drilling addition?


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Thank you very much for your input, all! I'm deleting posts to remove identifying data, but please keep your suggestions up -- they are very helpful! (If you delete my quotes, that'd be much appreciated, though.) 

Edited by Not_a_Number
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1 minute ago, HomeAgain said:

Probably Dragonbox Numbers.  It's pretty solid.  If they don't want to pay for an app, then I would definitely do Odd Squad games on PBS Kids.

Hmmm, so I really just want drill -- nothing fancy. I just looked Dragonbox numbers up and it looks a bit fancier than that. But I haven't downloaded it, so I'm not sure if I'm misreading. 

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Hmm...let me think.
I tend to go more hands on so just drill is hard.  If it was in person, I'd suggest the stacking flash cards I make for my littles.  I have them working on automation right now with those in multiplication and practice adding/subtracting with a board game.
What about Reflex Math?

Edited by HomeAgain
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Reflex Math only caters to schools now. For homeschoolers and parents, it was bought by time4mathfacts.com and it is $40 a year.

There is XtraMath but most kids wouldn't call that fun I don't think. My kids didn't/don't anyways.

This website has some games about midway down the article.

If you don't mind really, really, really retro games (like 5.25" floppy disk games from the 80's retro), archive.org has the old MECC math games. Here are a couple of the addition ones

Early Addition

Circus Math

My kiddo likes the retro games but he's a bit of a weird unsocialized homeschooler lol.

There used to be some really fun games and websites for math facts but they've all slowly disappeared. 

 

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2 minutes ago, sweet2ndchance said:

Reflex Math only caters to schools now. For homeschoolers and parents, it was bought by time4mathfacts.com and it is $40 a year.

There is XtraMath but most kids wouldn't call that fun I don't think. My kids didn't/don't anyways.

This website has some games about midway down the article.

Yeah, my Googling took me here, lol! I sent her the "alien spaceship" game for now: 

https://www.arcademics.com/games/alien

I also found this random dice game: 

https://www.abcya.com/games/sum_of_all_dice

 

2 minutes ago, sweet2ndchance said:

There used to be some really fun games and websites for math facts but they've all slowly disappeared. 

That's weird 😞 . Why did that happen?? Any idea? 

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3 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

That's weird 😞 . Why did that happen?? Any idea? 

I would imagine cost of upkeep could be a factor. Plus many of them were done in Flash which is obsolete now. A lot of the old websites just didn't bother to update. Some like Reflex Math and Big Brainz math went exclusively to the school market. Schools can afford to pay more for the product and remain customers for longer since there is always a constant influx of new young elementary kids needing to learn math facts unlike families which will eventually outgrow the product and no longer need it.

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3 minutes ago, sweet2ndchance said:

I would imagine cost of upkeep could be a factor. Plus many of them were done in Flash which is obsolete now. A lot of the old websites just didn't bother to update. Some like Reflex Math and Big Brainz math went exclusively to the school market. Schools can afford to pay more for the product and remain customers for longer since there is always a constant influx of new young elementary kids needing to learn math facts unlike families which will eventually outgrow the product and no longer need it.

Maybe I should make an app for that, too, when I start writing apps. How unfortunate. 

I was digging around the apps today and couldn't find anything that looked functional. Annoying. 

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I was just thinking about this for my kinder; she sounds a lot like your tutoring student. I have Math Speed Drill on my phone. It is not something she would choose to do on her own. 🙂

Do you have an opinion on old fashioned paper speed drills @Not_a_Number? I guess that wouldn't work for your student since you want something more engaging, but I was wondering if you would consider them a useful exercise for fluency? I'm conflicted as I did tons of paper speed drills as a kid and it was NOT effective practice with a procedural math education. As soon as I no longer had to produce, my brain released all those "memorized" facts. 

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Also the “yellow is the Sun” song from Right Start Math— all you want to addition of numbers under 10, right?

 Sorry I can’t put a link in right now but it’s easy to find on YouTube

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For drilling on iOS, some of the best apps aren't there any more.  What I can see is:

1. "Quick Math - Mental Arithmetic" Publisher is Shiny Things, I think addition is free.  We mainly did Quick Math Jr. back when.  You can set it to four levels, from beginner onwards.  Drilling, gamified.

2.  Also, you could look at Addimals, published by Teachley.  "Teachley - Addimal Adventure"  It's more of a drilling fun app, a bit of suspense.  My son did that one for a while. There's Teachley Subtractimals now as well, I see. 

3.  Have a look at Duck Duck Goose apps like Pet Bingo.  Free. Not pure drilling, but at least a bit gamified.  

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Still iOS, you could have a look at "Operation Math" - but it might ramp up pretty quickly from what I remember.  Publisher is "Little 10 Robot"

Same publisher, another app called "YodelOh Math Mountain" - we don't own this one, but I've always thought about buying it.  Carnival game style drilling.

Can't speak to the world of apps, lots of development work keeping up with new iOS changes, can only assume the revenue isn't there.

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Are her parents the type to do it with her?  If so, Kate Snow's addition facts that stick could work.  It teaches a few at a time to automaticity, uses games to practice, and includes printable cumulative review worksheets to practice.  You can find it here on the WTM website; once or twice a year it goes on significant sale.

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It's not quite what you're looking for (work on specific facts), but one of my kids used this for addition facts. It starts them with the easier facts and builds up to the harder ones.
Medieval Math Battle – The Best Math App for Kids | SPIN FALL

It doesn't appear to be available on android anymore, but is available for iOS:
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/medieval-math-battle-gold/id736769258
 

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I missed all the personal data, so my suggestions may be less useful. We like the game Rat-aTat Cat for getting fluent with units addition in your head and then Zeus on the Loose for larger numbers. I also sometimes could use the version of 24 that was just addition and subtraction. None are just flat out drilling, though.

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RightStart has an app with their Go To Ten game.  It's mostly for making pairs of 10, but that's a start.

https://rightstartmath.com/our-curriculum/apps/

ETA: Their corners app would work sums of 5, 10, 15, and 20.  We play corners with other sums as well, but I don't know if the app has that flexibility.  Corners is on of my kids' favorite games.

Edited by medawyn
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16 minutes ago, medawyn said:

RightStart has an app with their Go To Ten game.  It's mostly for making pairs of 10, but that's a start.

https://rightstartmath.com/our-curriculum/apps/

ETA: Their corners app would work sums of 5, 10, 15, and 20.  We play corners with other sums as well, but I don't know if the app has that flexibility.  Corners is on of my kids' favorite games.

That might be useful, actually. Thank you! 

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The only math facts drill that has worked for us is Reflex Math/Time4MathFacts.  (Yes, they changed the name for homeschoolers, but the app is the same.  I used it a couple years ago for my older kids to get really fast at their facts, and YDS is using it now.)  IMHO it's totally worth the $40 for a year.  Any other apps/programs we tried either were not structured enough (too much ability to play around, so not enough actual drill to get the facts stuck) or the timing element was too stressful.  Four things I like about Reflex/T4MF:

1. They have the kid take a typing speed test EVERY DAY before they start to see how long it takes them to read a number and then type it.  This is great because it means that the timer element is completely customized, designed to be achievable by your child on that particular day.   One of my kids has a really low processing speed, and the other two got really stressed by other time-limited games, but Reflex seems to have found the magic level that offers challenge without stressing them.

2. It's focused and keeps building.  They introduce one new fact family at a time, and then they continue reviewing the old stuff as they add the new.

3. It's fun and varied.  You keep getting to choose new games to try, and it has the added fun of having an avatar.

4. It's got a clear daily goal, and you know how far you've progressed and when you're done for the day by watching the little circle fill with green.

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7 minutes ago, eternallytired said:

The only math facts drill that has worked for us is Reflex Math/Time4MathFacts.  (Yes, they changed the name for homeschoolers, but the app is the same.  I used it a couple years ago for my older kids to get really fast at their facts, and YDS is using it now.)  IMHO it's totally worth the $40 for a year.  Any other apps/programs we tried either were not structured enough (too much ability to play around, so not enough actual drill to get the facts stuck) or the timing element was too stressful.  Four things I like about Reflex/T4MF:

1. They have the kid take a typing speed test EVERY DAY before they start to see how long it takes them to read a number and then type it.  This is great because it means that the timer element is completely customized, designed to be achievable by your child on that particular day.   One of my kids has a really low processing speed, and the other two got really stressed by other time-limited games, but Reflex seems to have found the magic level that offers challenge without stressing them.

2. It's focused and keeps building.  They introduce one new fact family at a time, and then they continue reviewing the old stuff as they add the new.

3. It's fun and varied.  You keep getting to choose new games to try, and it has the added fun of having an avatar.

4. It's got a clear daily goal, and you know how far you've progressed and when you're done for the day by watching the little circle fill with green.

Would it be able to just do addition? I was looking at it and I couldn’t tell how much control it would give.

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29 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

Would it be able to just do addition? I was looking at it and I couldn’t tell how much control it would give.

It pairs the functions, so addition and subtraction are combined and multiplication and division are combined.  It introduces new facts via fact families, so two addition paired with the corresponding two subtraction facts.  So maybe that's not helpful...

For pure addition, my kids were really motivated when I printed out a number line 1-12 and put an M&M on each number 2-12.  I gave them two dice and they got to eat the M&M on the sum they rolled.  They had to keep rolling until they had gotten every sum.  (We called it "Eat It!") I sat with them to make sure they got their facts right, but they got pretty quick at addition within 6!  (It's harder beyond that, since then your dice have too many numbers to make for good practice.  Maybe the old "War" card game?)

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, eternallytired said:

Maybe the old "War" card game?

Yes, that was my initial suggestion for them!! No idea if they tried it, alas. 
 

2 minutes ago, eternallytired said:

It pairs the functions, so addition and subtraction are combined and multiplication and division are combined.

That’s what I saw 😞 . I don’t love number bonds, to be honest, except in the context of robust visuals. Otherwise, kids wind up thinking subtraction is commutative, which is a huge problem later on.

Edited by Not_a_Number
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3 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

That’s what I saw 😞 . I don’t love number bonds, to be honest, except in the context of robust visuals. Otherwise, kids wind up thinking subtraction is commutative, which is a huge problem later on.

Well, I guess I'll hope for the best with my crew... 😬

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From the older kids, I got a look like I was crazy.  (And ultimately a, "Uh, no!")  From the youngest, I got, "Yes. ... Oh, wait a minute...  Noooooo.  It's negative five."  (Hand slaps head.)

Sigh.  That's not the best news, since the youngest is the one who tends to get weird ideas from who-knows-where and be absolutely convinced that they're fact.  I guess I just have to keep hoping that his understanding develops.  Of course, I also think there might be some weird auditory processing thing going on there, due to other issues we've had...

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, eternallytired said:

From the older kids, I got a look like I was crazy.  (And ultimately a, "Uh, no!")  From the youngest, I got, "Yes. ... Oh, wait a minute...  Noooooo.  It's negative five."  (Hand slaps head.)

Sigh.  That's not the best news, since the youngest is the one who tends to get weird ideas from who-knows-where and be absolutely convinced that they're fact.  I guess I just have to keep hoping that his understanding develops.  Of course, I also think there might be some weird auditory processing thing going on there, due to other issues we've had...

Sounds like they are just fine, honestly. They have a reasonable mental model of subtraction as "you're taking away the second number from the first." Great! (Since your younger kiddo corrected himself, it sounds like he's aware of this distinction, too. I wouldn't worry about the fact that he didn't get it right immediately.) 

I think about half of my homeschool classes thought that equation is right. I'm pretty sure it depends on how you TALK about subtraction at home. If you say things like "OK, we're doing 5 - 4... which one are we taking away?" then the kid gets to think about the directionality of subtraction. If you just talk about "the difference between 5 and 4," then a kid can easily absorb that there's only one "difference" and it's 1. 

You know what I mean? The wording one uses changes the mental model. 

Edited by Not_a_Number
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I really liked the Addition Facts that Stick series sold here on Well Trained Mind.   Really short, good, visual/tactile lessons followed by playing printable board games for practice (printable if you get the PDF...which I suggest so you can replace the game boards/pieces if they get messed up).

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Another vote for Time4MathFacts. We've done XtraMath too, and I like that it's free, and it works. But it gets groans, whereas Time4MathFacts gets excitement, which is worth the $40 for me 🙂

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RightStart has apps for some of their games. Go to the Dump and Corners are ones we have used. 

They also have a great game kit that goes through all of elementary mathematics topics. 

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On 4/30/2021 at 11:27 AM, eternallytired said:

 

Maybe the old "War" card game?)

We got a lot of mileage out math war card game.  I would edit the deck at first (combine 2 decks, and use only cards numbered 1-5), then add higher numbered cards in, then take out the 1's and 2's etc.  We used it to drill subtraction and multiplication too.  (and fractions).  Denise Gaskins has a page devoted to variations on math war.

Eternallytired's "Eat it" dice game could be extended with role playing dice (10-sided or 20-sided dice).  I wish I'd thought of this idea, my kid's would have loved it.

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8 minutes ago, wathe said:

We got a lot of mileage out math war card game.  I would edit the deck at first (combine 2 decks, and use only cards numbered 1-5), then add higher numbered cards in, then take out the 1's and 2's etc.  We used it to drill subtraction and multiplication too.  (and fractions).  Denise Gaskins has a page devoted to variations on math war.

Eternallytired's "Eat it" dice game could be extended with role playing dice (10-sided or 20-sided dice).  I wish I'd thought of this idea, my kid's would have loved it.

We did a ton of math war. The problem is that I need things that are automatic since it’s not for my kids. I may have to bite the bullet and code it myself...

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5 minutes ago, kiwik said:

Do you need to drill addition facts? Don't you just practice them as you do more complicated addition?

I've found that drilling to automaticity pays off, yes. I don't drill until we're fairly deeply into harder additions. 

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On 5/14/2021 at 10:52 AM, knitgrl said:

Just remembered Shut the Box. Very heavy on addition to 12, and there is more addition if you make the kid keep score. Everybody at this house would rather play this than "do math."

Ooo, we played this a lot!! And there' a really great game Go Nuts! where the squirrels, dogs, cars, etc. create chaos. 

My *favorite* game nails addition and subtraction in one if you play it enough and milk it enough. Positive/Negative Turnovers from her *free* Math Card Games book. For the price, can't beat it, haha. We played it with ante poker cards, which are long and skinny like popsicle sticks, so that's your only real expense. Technically you could play with whatever you have, but the ante poker cards are worth it.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/114820763450?hash=item1abbd9cf3a:g:iGsAAOSwif9f3tZ8  Here they are new for $4.

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On 5/23/2021 at 7:32 PM, PeterPan said:

My *favorite* game nails addition and subtraction in one if you play it enough and milk it enough. Positive/Negative Turnovers from her *free* Math Card Games book. For the price, can't beat it, haha.

Do you have a link to this math card game book?

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On 5/23/2021 at 1:01 AM, Not_a_Number said:

I've found that drilling to automaticity pays off, yes. I don't drill until we're fairly deeply into harder additions. 

I just have a clear recollection of multiplication drills at school but not of any others.  I don't do drill with Ds12 but that has to do with his personality.

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1 hour ago, kiwik said:

I just have a clear recollection of multiplication drills at school but not of any others.  I don't do drill with Ds12 but that has to do with his personality.

We’ve always done it very informally here 🙂 . We’d do it walking around and it wasn’t timed. But I did find it helpful.

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Posted (edited)

Addition Facts that Stick worked really well for my son.    It's sold right here on Well Trained Mind.

It has short visual lessons and between each lesson is a week of game-play (on printable games...well, if you buy the printable version, which I suggest, as you can re-print anything that gets lost or damaged).  You could just use the games but the lessons were really helpful to my son.    We usually did two weeks of games in stead of one, save for some of the earlier lessons.   We skipped the other math practice pages though.

  We had done Math U See before this and it just didn't stick.

Edited by goldenecho
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22 hours ago, goldenecho said:

Addition Facts that Stick worked really well for my son.    It's sold right here on Well Trained Mind.

It has short visual lessons and between each lesson is a week of game-play (on printable games...well, if you buy the printable version, which I suggest, as you can re-print anything that gets lost or damaged).  You could just use the games but the lessons were really helpful to my son.    We usually did two weeks of games in stead of one, save for some of the earlier lessons.   We skipped the other math practice pages though.

  We had done Math U See before this and it just didn't stick.

Yeah, that's the kind of thing I do, although I don't tend to do it in a very linear fashion. But I was really just hoping for basic computerized drill for someone else's kid 🙂 . 

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