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We tried Latin and failed, but the kids are all interested in French. I took some French in University but don't remember much. I am fully confident that I will pick it up again rather easily as we work together to learn. The end goal is to be able to speak, read, and write in French. DuoLingo/Rosetta Stone is not what I have in mind. I want the kids to learn the French grammar, not just vocabulary. We are working in solid early to middle middle school range here. What would you suggest?

Also, is there a difference between France French amd Canadian French?

Edited by Enigma6
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We ended up with Nallenart for a few years.  I bought the download version because I wasn't waiting for it to come from Canada. It worked well enough, paired with First Step En Francais (Knowitall.org) the first year and then Telefrancais (youtube) the next two years. At that point we added Getting Started With French because Nallenart was a little slower than we wanted.
There is a mostly accent and colloquial difference between Canadian and Parisian.  DS is terrible at speaking so it doesn't matter. 😄  Plus, all beginners start with the same vocab and grammar, really, so I wasn't going to stress it.
This year (5th grade) we've abandoned formal programs: He's using a 1st grade 180-Day style workbook, easy readers (we started with ones from Fluency Matters and then moved to ones meant for French 6yos), and preschool cartoons like TroTro. Occasionally I'll pull material from teachers in France.  Like, we just did a whole unit on The Very Hungry Caterpillar.  He had a workpacket for reading/writing, studied the life cycle of various animals in his 180 day book, did a life cycle project, had cards to put in order, watched the story every day...it was like Five In A Row, but all in French.

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We started with Getting Started With French.

I like it because it's a grammar based approach with limited vocabulary, not a vocabulary and phrase based approach (so many language learner programs seem to be very heavy on vocab and light on grammar).  I think that once you learn the grammar of a language, then adding vocab is easy.  Not so true vice versa, I don't think.

We just finished it last week.  We're going to move on to Easy French - still grammar based, but more vocabulary and more depth.

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We're going to try CAP's French for Children starting this summer. It looks like a good balance of formal grammar, vocabulary, and dialogue. The videos look a little dry, but hopefully the kids will be able to focus and learn from them. The kids I'm having do this will be in 2nd and 4th next year, so a bit young for it, according to their recommendations, so we'll take it slowly.

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On 4/15/2021 at 3:06 PM, HomeAgain said:

This year (5th grade) we've abandoned formal programs: He's using a 1st grade 180-Day style workbook, easy readers (we started with ones from Fluency Matters and then moved to ones meant for French 6yos), and preschool cartoons like TroTro. Occasionally I'll pull material from teachers in France.  Like, we just did a whole unit on The Very Hungry Caterpillar.  He had a workpacket for reading/writing, studied the life cycle of various animals in his 180 day book, did a life cycle project, had cards to put in order, watched the story every day...it was like Five In A Row, but all in French.

Can you please link the 180 Day style workbook that you're using?
Can you share some of the links you use when you pull material from teachers in France?

We're using TheUlat.com, a book of phrases for French for Around the House  and have a bunch of leveled readers from Reading AZ but they're translations so I'm hesitant to use the earlier levels and he can't read the higher levels. I'd love to find a native French literacy program meant for 6yos.

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19 minutes ago, mathmarm said:

Can you please link the 180 Day style workbook that you're using?
Can you share some of the links you use when you pull material from teachers in France?

We're using TheUlat.com, a book of phrases for French for Around the House  and have a bunch of leveled readers from Reading AZ but they're translations so I'm hesitant to use the earlier levels and he can't read the higher levels. I'd love to find a native French literacy program meant for 6yos.

Sure.  Here you go:
L'Annee De CP
J'Apprends A Lire Avec Sami Et Julie (the stars at the top tell what level.  We began at the beginning with red stars)
Fluency Matters - these are carefully curated chapter books that have a specific number of unique words each.  I think the easiest, Edi L'Elefant, has 70-ish.
Worksheets/printable readers:
http://soutien67.free.fr/francais/francais_exercices.htm
There are others, but mostly I just search up the French version of what I am looking for along with "fiches", "activites" or "maternelle".  Like right now, we're doing a unit on going to the zoo.  (beyond animals), so I'm looking up ideas for making a map, labeling buildings, things to buy, getting a ticket, what to do if you get lost..
We're doing the Where You Live pages in his workbook, a Sami & Julie book about the zoo, and setting up our map this week.  Next week he'll write a small paragraph about one animal (things like size, color, continent of origin), make a concession stand poster, and we will play going to the zoo.

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