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Household Wood Rot/Wood Damage Repair: A Product Endorsement


Spy Car
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Just want to share a pair of symbiotic products with anyone who may--like me--be in need of dealing with wood damage around the house.

I've been working on prepping our home, built in 1939-40 for a new paint job--which I'm hoping to do myself (wife thinks that's nuts, but I've agreed to get help if and when I need to).

We have a few really bad spots where we have wood damage, including a couple of window sills. Some termite damage (termites now eradicated) and some rot. My carpentry skills are limited and I don't have a woodshop. So "fixing" damaged wood is better for me that trying to do "construction."

Anyway, the two products are both made by PC Woody.

One is a milky fluid that one paints on to wood that is still "intact" but not optimal (after one scrapes way truly soft wood). The stuff is called PC-Petrifier Water-Based Wood Hardener. It can take a few coats (apply liberally) but the wood soaks this stuff up and then hardens up. Really impressive, I must say.

 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008DYMVUC?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&ref_=chk_typ_imgToDp&th=1

Then to fill cracks and voids one mixes up their companion product, PC Woody 2 Part Epoxy. Once one mixes equal parts of this 2 part filler (being careful to to cross contaminate the cans) you get a nice peanut butter like spread that's pretty easy to work with.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008DYN4KS?psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&ref_=chk_typ_imgToDp

Some of the beauty parts of this product are that there is no smell (I tend to be chemically sensitive), it doesn't dry too fast so one has time to work w/o feeling rushed, one can go back and mold it a little (I've found a nitrile glove lubricated with a little rubbing alcohol makes the product easy to mold after it has had a little time to set up, and it seems like this stuff remains very much like wood. It eventenly has finely ground up wood mixed in and it supposedly will slightly expand and contract (like wood) instead of being rock-hard and cracking and being almost un-sandable once cured like Bondo.

This stuff is sandable, paintable, and stainable.

This stuff comes in a wide variety of sizes so one can do small projects or big ones.

And if I can use it with success, anyone can.

Perhaps some of you are in the same boat and this helps.

Bill

 

Edited by Spy Car
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Thank you!!! I’m hoping to do several projects this summer once school is out. While I know we have a few spots that just must be replaced, there are a few others I think this would cover. Definitely going to try it.

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15 minutes ago, kand said:

Would you use it on something structurally important, like deck supports? We have some mild moisture ant damage and have expected at some point to have to bite the bullet and have them replaced. 

From what I've read this product is considered "structural" (stronger than wood) and recommended for structural-type purposes.

I'm no expert and there may be times when it is easier or cheaper to swap out wood supports, but I'm finding that these products (used together) are saving me from some pretty big headaches and construction costs in areas like window casements. Plus this stuff seems like it will last forever and not crack the way many other wood fillers do.

It really seems "like wood" when it hardens (and it is waterproof).

If you use it, scrape way any wood that is truly "soft' or rotten. The wood that is intact--but not ideal--will harden up after a couple coats (or more) of the hardener. It is a little bit astonishing what the harder does to "marginal" wood. Really hardens up.

Bill

 

 

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18 minutes ago, momto3innc said:

Thank you!!! I’m hoping to do several projects this summer once school is out. While I know we have a few spots that just must be replaced, there are a few others I think this would cover. Definitely going to try it.

I got the smallest cans available at first just to make sure I liked this stuff before ordering it in big sizes. I could not be more impressed.

I had a couple cans of Bondo stashed away in my utility shed, but I know that stuff blows brain cells, is a pain to deal with, is hard to sand, and it cracks. No good. After a lot of digging I found this stuff. Very pleased!

Bill

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Thanks for posting about this! the product I’ve used for years works great but the smell is awful, and the work time is more like 10 minutes.  We used it extensively in our house built in 1880 and a couple of years ago we bought a ‘new’ house- 15 years old. I thought a house this new would’t need rotted wood repair but I’ve found a couple of spots and this will be perfect. Yay!

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5 minutes ago, Annie G said:

Thanks for posting about this! the product I’ve used for years works great but the smell is awful, and the work time is more like 10 minutes.  We used it extensively in our house built in 1880 and a couple of years ago we bought a ‘new’ house- 15 years old. I thought a house this new would’t need rotted wood repair but I’ve found a couple of spots and this will be perfect. Yay!

This stuff has virtually no VOCs. I "react" off many solvent-based chemical products. The PC Woody is totally benign.

And not setting up too quickly is a huge (huge) plus. 

I know this is sort of an odd topic for this forum, but this stuff is so excellent that I wanted to share. Hope you like it.

Bill

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10 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

 

I know this is sort of an odd topic for this forum, but this stuff is so excellent that I wanted to share. Hope you like it.

I’m sure I’ll like it! Two trim pieces around our garage door have some decay at the bottom. I hate to replace it- the price of wood is high and I just prefer to repair things rather than replace them, if possible.  In the past I was able to salvage so many trim pieces on windows and the repairs held up perfectly.  So to have a product that doesn’t smell awful AND gives me more working time? I’m pretty excited to get it!

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1 hour ago, Annie G said:

I’m sure I’ll like it! Two trim pieces around our garage door have some decay at the bottom. I hate to replace it- the price of wood is high and I just prefer to repair things rather than replace them, if possible.  In the past I was able to salvage so many trim pieces on windows and the repairs held up perfectly.  So to have a product that doesn’t smell awful AND gives me more working time? I’m pretty excited to get it!

I was actually working on our wood "garage" door today. Scare quotes, as we sealed the door and converted the space into (first) a very nice office/editing bay for myself, and then a very nice room for my son when he got bounced from his bedroom when my mother came to live with us. He refuses to give me back my studio now that his old room is available--hard to blame him.

I had the same issue as you, decay along a bottom piece that was poorly sealed and the rot was concealed (until it wasn't). 

Anyway, the panels have details (coves and grooves) that we'd lose entirely were I to attempt to replace pieces, so I'm trying to work carefully to match what's there. So far, so good.

I'm going to replace the strip of baseboard that our contractor used when he sealed the door. It was really rotten. Might be something I replace with a piece of artificial wood that can't rot. And then seal it all well. The PC Wood is supposedly waterproof, so hopefully it is a "forever fix" for me.

If you have wood that's intact--but not ideal--do use the hardener first. I'm still gobsmacked by how solid "marginal" wood feels once treated. 

Especially since you have experience with other products, I'd love to hear about what you think of the PC Woody once you try it out.

Bill

 

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2 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I know this is sort of an odd topic for this forum, but this stuff is so excellent that I wanted to share. Hope you like it.

Bill

I can think of other topics that have been more out there. 😂

Thank you for the review and recommendation. I have a deck that needs replacing, but hopefully 🤞🏼🤞🏼not the structure, just the surface. This stuff might come in handy.

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The hardener is a crucial part- a friend used an epoxy wood filler without using the hardener and the repair didn’t last. The hardener is very thin and I basically drench the area to let it soak in as far as possible. It’ll be interesting to see how much hardener 15 year old rot needs vs the 100 year old rot.   The epoxy I’ve been using isn’t a 50/50 mix so this should be easier. What I’ve been using has like a half cup of part A and then a tube of part B but you only use a tiny bit, like a dime’s worth. Too much and it hardens in like a minute. Too little and it’s too runny to be able to hold the form. Which means there is a lot more sanding to get it finished. 
 

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Well, darn. I just finished ALL of my interior dry wood rot projects using Bondo. Everything turned out great but that stuff is a ***** to work with.

Thank you for the recommendations because I will be buying the PC Woody products in the future to use in my 1940s mid-century modern mess of a home (way more beautiful now though).

 

Okay, now I must let y'all in on a really great paint remover if you should ever need one. Maybe you've heard of it. Anyway, I love this stuff and used it all over our current home. It is called Smart Strip and is made by Dumond. No VOCs, smells like the old-timey Elmer's glue paste (only old-timer's know what glue paste is). It's somewhat thick, like a thick cream. You slather it on to a certain thickness and let it dwell -- less for a varnish or thin layer of paint and more for thicker layers of paint -- cover with waxed paper of cut-up plastic bags and then, voila! The paint comes off as you peel off the waxed paper or plastic. Now, it's not always 100% and you do have to scrape it off quickly but you can repeat the process to get the remainder off. Just be careful with removing varnish on veneers because if it dwells for too long, it can ruin the veneer.

https://www.amazon.com/Dumond-Chemicals-Smart-Advanced-Remover/dp/B001PCVKLK/ref=asc_df_B001PCVKLK/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167138874211&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17757006391638742874&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9021564&hvtargid=pla-309606680052&psc=1

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3 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

Well, darn. I just finished ALL of my interior dry wood rot projects using Bondo. Everything turned out great but that stuff is a ***** to work with.

Thank you for the recommendations because I will be buying the PC Woody products in the future to use in my 1940s mid-century modern mess of a home (way more beautiful now though).

 

Okay, now I must let y'all in on a really great paint remover if you should ever need one. Maybe you've heard of it. Anyway, I love this stuff and used it all over our current home. It is called Smart Strip and is made by Dumond. No VOCs, smells like the old-timey Elmer's glue paste (only old-timer's know what glue paste is). It's somewhat thick, like a thick cream. You slather it on to a certain thickness and let it dwell -- less for a varnish or thin layer of paint and more for thicker layers of paint -- cover with waxed paper of cut-up plastic bags and then, voila! The paint comes off as you peel off the waxed paper or plastic. Now, it's not always 100% and you do have to scrape it off quickly but you can repeat the process to get the remainder off. Just be careful with removing varnish on veneers because if it dwells for too long, it can ruin the veneer.

https://www.amazon.com/Dumond-Chemicals-Smart-Advanced-Remover/dp/B001PCVKLK/ref=asc_df_B001PCVKLK/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167138874211&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17757006391638742874&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9021564&hvtargid=pla-309606680052&psc=1

Thank you for the paint remover recommendation. Sounds perfect and I'm going to need some.

The non-toxic part is a huge positive and it sounds easy. Definitely going to check out the Smart Strip. 

Bill

 

 

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I am loving this thread! We bought our ca. 1960's home last summer from the original owners. The kitchen is in all of it's 60's glory with orangey looking mahogany cabinetry. It's... not pretty. I've been thinking about "back-up-dating" it and going retro to the 50's with paint and a few minor renovations + furniture. I will need to strip the cabinets.

Keep the product recommendations coming! Anybody have a paint that they used on kitchen cabinetry that they loved?

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9 hours ago, fraidycat said:

I am loving this thread! We bought our ca. 1960's home last summer from the original owners. The kitchen is in all of it's 60's glory with orangey looking mahogany cabinetry. It's... not pretty. I've been thinking about "back-up-dating" it and going retro to the 50's with paint and a few minor renovations + furniture. I will need to strip the cabinets.

Keep the product recommendations coming! Anybody have a paint that they used on kitchen cabinetry that they loved?

Well, since you asked... 😄

If you are going to work with paint stripper, apply it with disposable brushes such as those cheap coarse bristled ones big boxes sell for a buck or so. Get many if your project is large, possibly in different sizes. You'll also need a paint scraper. And green Scotch-Brite sponges to remove the last bits of remaining and embedded paint after using the paint scraper. The green color from the sponge can transfer to light wood so find lighter gritty sponges if needed. Many thin latex gloves, too, to protect your hands.

Cardboard is great for catching the paint and stripper as it falls. I prefer it to tarps because Amazon and other stores give them to me for free(!) and all I have to do is cut them into large sizes. They are easy to align on the floor, butted up against a wall and then scooted over as you paint. When you're all done, just toss or recycle.

If you have a lot of sanding to do, and no lead paint or varnish is involved, buy an electric sander. I have used a Bosch random orbit sander all over my house and it has held up beautifully. It makes sanding jobs fun. Really! Just purrs and whirs, cutting through old paint and smoothing wood.

Then you must buy quality sandpaper. Don't get any of the cheapo stuff at the big box stores. No, no, no. I have tried many brands and am now a connoisseur of quality sandpaper. You need something good like Norton, Gator or Mirka Gold, which I like. Bosch also makes good sandpaper. Believe me, quality of sandpaper reduces sanding misery tremendously. Just be sure to choose the appropriate grit and then finish off with finer grits. Prepping is what makes a job shine and last.

This model of Bosch works well and comes with a hard case which I highly recommend.

Mirka assorted grit sandpaper, 8 holes, hook and loop (works with the Bosch sander above). I suspect Amazon might be carrying some bogus knockoff Mirka sandpaper, so if you do order from there, just make sure it's coming from a seller who is reputable.

I have never painted cabinets but I would think you'd want a paint that self levels, cures well and can withstand abuse. Not sure which brand or type. I believe I've read that Sherwin Williams is popular for cabinets but not sure. If you are rolling it on, get one of their hot pink mohair rollers, which has a very short nap, because that will give you a beautiful, even. smooth finish.

Edited by BeachGal
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@BeachGal So I just applied my first test patches of Dumond Smart Strip. I used wax paper as the backing. In most of the test spots I applied it liberally (as suggested), but I started to run short of the product that I'd poured off and decided to leave it "thin" for the sake of comparison.

Thanks again for the recommendation. Curious to see how it turns out tomorrow when I peel it off. 

Bill

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8 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

@Spy Car How did the Smart Strip work for you?

I just got back from camping but I have another recommendation for you diy painters! You might have to scour the different boards but the advice here can be pretty helpful.

https://jackpauhl.proboards.com

Working well. At least as well as the toxic alternatives that I know about, so very happy for the recommendation.

Smart Strip has been less than a "miracle," as I have needed to scrape and deal with some residual paint in my test area, but that's what I expected. Just what I needed in areas where I don't want to just sand. 

Thanks for the link to the DIY board.

Speaking of painting, do you have thoughts on exterior paint?

I've always used Dunn Edwards--but with a painting contractor. Dunn Edwards pricing is not that transparent for DIY homeowner/painters. There are many options locally including Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore, and the Behr line. I think I will prime everything after doing very good prep. I'd like the job to last. 

Bill

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Yes, I had to go back and reapply the Smart Strip in some areas as well. It's a little tricky scraping off the paint. I wiped the gooey paint/stripper mess on  edges of cardboard which I discarded once the cardboard was filled. It was a pain but worked fairly well.

I've always lived in brick houses and now live in a brick co-op, so no exterior maintenance projects for moi! (And I am not complaining.)

The Jack Pauhl website will have many discussions/heated arguments over what is the best exterior paint to use. It's a helpful resource.

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Thanks for sharing this, Spy Car.  The bottom of the wood trim around our garage door keeps getting gnawed on by something; we painted over it, but then it happened again.  It doesn't have obvious tooth marks, but it's clearly been chewed on.  Do ants do that?  Maybe this stuff will help.

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11 minutes ago, klmama said:

Thanks for sharing this, Spy Car.  The bottom of the wood trim around our garage door keeps getting gnawed on by something; we painted over it, but then it happened again.  It doesn't have obvious tooth marks, but it's clearly been chewed on.  Do ants do that?  Maybe this stuff will help.

If your wood is soft, it could be carpenter ants or carpenter bees. One sign is little piles of sawdust, but if they are chewing on the other side, the sawdust might be over there and not visible. You could try using a poison made especially for them but make sure pets or children won't be able to mess with it. If you place it on something like a strip of blue painter's tape, you can slip it under the cracks and then remove a week or so later. Carpenter ants come out at night and you could sneak up with a flash light at night to see if they're there. Crafty little guys.

Edited by BeachGal
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1 hour ago, klmama said:

Thanks for sharing this, Spy Car.  The bottom of the wood trim around our garage door keeps getting gnawed on by something; we painted over it, but then it happened again.  It doesn't have obvious tooth marks, but it's clearly been chewed on.  Do ants do that?  Maybe this stuff will help.

I'll defer to others like @BeachGal as to what's causing the gnawing, as I have no experience with carpenter ants (etc).

While the PC Woody does have some percentage of wood fiber mixed in with the epoxy, I serious doubt that any insects would be capable of eating this stuff and it makes a great fix for damaged wood after you get rid of the root problem.

Bill

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